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Tolterodine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(R)-2-[3-(diisopropylamino)-1-phenylpropyl]-4-methylphenol
Identifiers
CAS number 124937-51-5
ATC code G04BD07
PubChem 60774
DrugBank APRD00146
Chemical data
Formula C 22H31NO 
Mol. mass 325.488 g/mol
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 77%
Protein binding Approximately 96.3%.
Metabolism  ?
Half life 1.9-3.7 hours
Excretion  ?
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.  ?
Legal status
Routes  ?
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Tolterodine (Detrol, Detrusitol) is an antimuscarinic drug that is used to treat urinary incontinence.

Contents

Pharmacology

Tolterodine acts on M1, M2, M3, M4 and M5 subtypes of muscarinic receptors whereas modern antimuscarinic treatments for overactive bladder only act on M3 receptors making them more selective. It is marketed and manufactured by Pfizer.

Tolterodine, although it acts on all types of receptors, has fewer side effects than other antimuscarinics eg. oxybutynin (M3 and M1 selective, but more so in the parotid than in the bladder) as tolterodine targets the bladder more than other areas of the body. This means that less drug needs to be given daily (due to efficient targeting of the bladder) and so there are fewer side effects.

Side effects

Known side effects:

The following reactions have been reported in patients who have taken tolterodine since it has become available:

Contraindications:

Not to be used in patients with myasthenia gravis and angle closure glaucoma.

Marketing

New York Times reporter Melody Peterson, who wrote the book Our Daily Meds: How the Pharmaceutical Companies Transformed Themselves into Slick Marketing Machines and Hooked the Nation on Prescription Drugs (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008), said that "the most outrageous thing" she saw covering the pharmaceutical industry was a PowerPoint presentaton on "Creating a Disease," which created a disease called "overactive bladder" for the purpose of marketing Detrol. Doctors try to manage incontinence in non-pharmaceutical ways, she said. Detrol became a blockbuster, said Peterson, despite the adverse effect of severe memory problems.[1]

References

External links








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