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Tommie Frazier
No. 15     Retired
Quarterback
Personal information
Date of birth: July 16, 1974 (1974-07-16) (age 35)
Place of birth: Bradenton, Florida
Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) Weight: 200 lb (91 kg)
Career information
College: Nebraska
No regular season or postseason appearances
Career history
 As player:
Career highlights and awards

Tommie James Frazier, Jr. (born on July 16, 1974, in Bradenton, Florida) is a former NCAA football quarterback for the Nebraska Cornhuskers. He is considered one of the greatest quarterbacks in NCAA Division I-A history.

Frazier led his team to back-to-back consensus national championships in 1994 and 1995, and he remains the only quarterback to have done so since the 1950s. The 1995 Nebraska team is considered to have been one of the most dominant in the history of American college football.[1][2] In a 2006 ESPN.com poll, the results of which aired on SportsCenter, the 1995 Nebraska team was voted the best college team of all time.

In 1999 Frazier was selected by Sports Illustrated as a back-up quarterback in their "NCAA Football All-Century Team." The starting quarterback was Sammy Baugh and the other back-ups were John Lujack, Roger Staubach and Doug Flutie. Frazier was one of six Nebraska Cornhuskers on this 85 man roster; the others being Johnny Rodgers, Rich Glover, Dave Rimington, Dean Steinkuhler and Aaron Taylor.

In 2004, CollegeFootballNews.com named Frazier the #33 player on their list of the Top 100 Greatest College Football Players of All-Time.

Frazier was never drafted in the NFL due to a serious blood clot in his left leg, a side effect of Crohn’s disease.[3]

Contents

Personal

Tommie grew up in Bradenton, Florida and attended Manatee High School. He then played at Nebraska for four years, leading them to two national titles. He was then the head coach at Doane College in Crete, Nebraska[4], but went 3-17 in the two years that he was there[5].

Frazier is married to the former Andrea Stephens, who is originally from Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The couple has a son, Tommie James Frazier III and a daughter Ava.

Frazier is also a member of Iota Phi Theta fraternity.

Big-game quarterback

When he arrived in Lincoln from Bradenton, Florida, the Huskers had suffered years of bowl game blowouts. Coach Tom Osborne made a strategic decision to recruit faster players at all positions in the early 1990s to compete with Miami and Florida State in the seemingly annual Orange Bowl matchups. Frazier was the final piece of the puzzle and led the Huskers to four straight New Year's Day bowl games. He started as a true freshman in 1992. In 1993, as a sophomore, Frazier kept pace with Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward of Florida State in the Orange Bowl but fell just short of leading the Huskers to the National Championship because of a last minute drive by Ward and field goal by the Seminoles. Amazingly, Frazier still got his team in position for a game-winning 45 yard field goal attempt, but it sailed wide left. He was still named MVP of the National Title game despite the loss.


The following year was trying for Frazier as he battled a blood clot in his leg which held him out of the second half of the season. On the legs of Lawrence Phillips, the Huskers got back to the Orange Bowl and played the Miami Hurricanes for a shot at the National Championship. In the game, Coach Osborne started Frazier but then pulled him for backup Brook Berringer. In the fourth quarter Osborne went back to Frazier and he responded with two touchdown drives. The tired Miami defense led by Warren Sapp and Ray Lewis could not keep up with the Nebraska option as the Huskers celebrated their first national title since 1971 and the first of Coach Osborne's career. Frazier was once again named MVP.

In 1995, Frazier was finally healthy and led the Huskers on a dominating march through college football. Despite always having great arm strength, Frazier was never known for his passing accuracy. Frazier consistently improved his passing - particularly when throwing touch passes - and by his senior year completed 56 percent of his passes for 17 touchdowns and only 4 interceptions. Frazier teamed with Lawrence Phillips and Ahman Green to form one the most punishing rushing attacks in college football history, setting an NCAA record for averaging 7.0 yards per rushing attempt. The Huskers finished the season undefeated and were matched with the also undefeated Florida Gators in the Fiesta Bowl. Nebraska defeated the Gators 62-24 and Frazier garnered his third straight National Title Game MVP Award. He finished with 199 yards and 2 TDs on the ground, and another 105 yards and a TD through the air. The highlight of the game was a 75 yard run by Frazier with multiple broken tackles as the third quarter ended.

Frazier is the only player ever to win MVP of three national championship games.

Coaching

After graduation, Frazier served as assistant football coach at Baylor University, and as assistant director of athletic development at Nebraska.

In 2005, Frazier became the 32nd head college football coach for the Doane College Tigers located in Crete, Nebraska and he held that position for two seasons, 2005 and 2006. His coaching record at Doane was 3 wins, 17 losses, and 0 ties. As of the conclusion of the 2007 season, this ranks him 22nd at Doane in total wins and 33rd at Doane in winning percentage (0.150).[6]

Currently, he is working as an account executive with an energy company.

Career statistics

Record as starter: 33-3 (91.7%)
Passing: 250-509 (49.1%), 4,003 yards, 47 TD, 18 INT
Rushing: 386 carries, 2,263 yards (5.9 ypc), 36 TD
Senior stats (Heisman Trophy runner-up): 98-177 (55.4%), 1,467 yards, 18 TD, 6 INT
113 carries, 803 yards (7.1 ypc), 16 TD

References

External links

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