The Full Wiki

Tottenham: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Coordinates: 51°35′51″N 0°04′18″W / 51.5974°N 0.0716°W / 51.5974; -0.0716

Tottenham
Tottenham town hall 1.jpg
Tottenham Town Hall, now Haringey Council Offices
Tottenham is located in Greater London
Tottenham

 Tottenham shown within Greater London
OS grid reference TQ335905
London borough Haringey
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LONDON
Postcode district N15, N17
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
EU Parliament London
UK Parliament Tottenham
London Assembly Enfield and Haringey
List of places: UK • England • London

Tottenham (pronounced /ˈtɒʔnəm/) is a suburban area of North London, England in the London Borough of Haringey, situated 6.6 miles (10.6 km) north-east of Charing Cross.

Contents

History

There has been a settlement at Tottenham for over a thousand years. It grew up along the old Roman road, Ermine Street (some of which is part of the present A10 road), and between High Cross and Tottenham Hale, the present Monument Way.

Advertisements

Etymology

Tottenham is believed to have been named after Tota, a farmer, whose hamlet was mentioned in the Domesday Book; hence Tota's hamlet became Tottenham.

Early Tottenham

Tottenham in 1619 (South shown at the top of the map).

Toteham as it was then known was mentioned in the Domesday Book.[1] When it was compiled in 1086, about 70 families lived within the area of the manor, mostly labourers working for the Lord of the Manor. A humorous poem entitled the Tournament of Tottenham, written around 1400, describes a mock-battle between peasants vying for the reeve's daughter.

In 1894, Tottenham was made an urban district and on 27 September, 1934 it became a municipal borough. As from 1 April, 1965, the municipal borough formed part of the London Borough of Haringey.

The River Lee (or Lea) was the eastern boundary of the Municipal Boroughs of Tottenham and Walthamstow. It is the ancient boundary between Middlesex and Essex and also formed the western boundary of the Viking controlled Danelaw. Today it is the boundary between the London Boroughs of Haringey and Waltham Forest. A major tributary of the Lee, the River Moselle, also crosses the borough from west to east, and often caused serious flooding until it was mostly covered in the 19th century.

From the Tudor period onwards, Tottenham became a popular recreation and leisure destination for wealthy Londoners. Henry VIII is known to have visited Bruce Castle and also hunted in Tottenham Wood. A rural Tottenham also featured in Izaak Walton's book The Compleat Angler, published in 1653.[2] The area became noted for its large Quaker population[3] and its schools (including Rowland Hill's at Bruce Castle.[4]) Tottenham remained a semi-rural and upper middle class area until the 1870s.

Modern Tottenham

In late 1870, the Great Eastern Railway introduced special workman's trains and fares on its newly opened Enfield and Chingford branch lines. Tottenham's low-lying fields and market gardens were then rapidly transformed into cheap housing for the lower middle and working classes, who were able to commute cheaply to inner London. The workman's fare policy stimulated the relatively early development of the area into a London suburb.

Programmes of the Incorporation of Tottenham celebrations in 1934

An incident occurred on 23 January 1909, which was at the time known as the Tottenham Outrage.[5] Two armed robbers of Russian extraction held up the wages clerk of a rubber works in Chesnut Road. They made their getaway via Tottenham Marshes and fled across the Lee. On the opposite bank of the river they hijacked a Walthamstow Corporation tramcar, hotly pursued by the police on another tram. The hijacked tram was stopped but the robbers continued their flight on foot. After firing their weapons and killing two people, Ralph Joscelyne, aged 10, and PC William Tyler, they were eventually cornered by the police and shot themselves rather than be captured. Fourteen other people were wounded during the chase. The incident later became the subject of a silent film.[6]

During the Second World War Tottenham also became a target of the German air offensive against Britain. Bombs fell within the borough (Elmar Road) during the first air raid on London on 24 August, 1940. The borough also received V1 (four incidents) and V2 hits, the last of which occurred on 15 March, 1945. Wartime shortages led to the creation of Tottenham Pudding, a mixture of household waste food which was converted into feeding stuffs for pigs and poultry. The "pudding" was named by Queen Mary on a visit to Tottenham Refuse Works. Production continued into the post-war period, its demise coinciding with the merging of the borough into the new London Borough of Haringey.

In 1985, the Broadwater Farm housing estate in Tottenham was the scene of rioting between the police and local youths following the death of Cynthia Jarrett, a resident of the estate who died of heart failure after four policemen burst into her home. One police officer - PC Keith Blakelock - was killed. 58 policemen and 24 other people were injured in the fighting. Two of the policemen were injured by gunshots during the riot, the first time that firearms had been used in that type of confrontation.

Sites or buildings of historical interest

Bruce Castle, the old Tottenham manor house, now a museum. (November 2005)
  • All Hallows Church - This is the oldest surviving building in the borough, and dates back to Norman times. For more than 700 years it was the original parish church for Tottenham. Presented in 1801 with a bell from the Quebec Garrison which was captured from the French in the Battle of Quebec, Montreal, Canada. Adjacent to the church is
  • Tottenham Cemetery - A large cemetery, which makes up part of an open access area of land and habitat, along with Bruce Castle Park and All Hallows Churchyard.[7]
  • Broadwater Farm - Housing estate built in 1967, that was the site of the Broadwater Farm riot in 1985.
  • Brook Street Chapel - Non-denominational Christian chapel established in 1839, one of the earliest Plymouth Brethren /Open Brethren assemblies in London that still exists. The church was associated with local notable Christians such as Hudson Taylor, Dr Barnardo, John Eliot Howard, Luke Howard and Philip Gosse.[8]
  • Bruce Castle, Lordship Lane - Grade 1 listed, it was Tottenham's manor house, and dates from the 16th century, with alterations by subsequent occupants. It was given the name 'Bruce Castle' during the 17th century by the 2nd Lord Coleraine, who was Lord of the Manor at the time. He named it after 'Robert the Bruce', whose family had been Lord of the Manor during the medieval period. The building was purchased by the Hill family who ran a progressive school there. Sir Rowland Hill was its first headmaster and he was living here when he as Postmaster General introduced the Uniform Penny Post in 1840.[9] Now a local history museum, it holds the archives of the London Borough of Haringey.
  • 7 Bruce Grove - The building features an English Heritage blue plaque to Luke Howard (1772–1864), the 'Father of Meteorology', who named the clouds in 1802.
  • Clyde Circus conservation area
  • Edmanson’s Close previously known as the Almshouses of the Drapers' Company. They were built in 1870 and were established out of the generosity of three 17th century benefactors, Sir John Jolles, John Pemel and John Edmanson.
The towers of the Broadwater Farm Estate dominate the western part of Tottenham.

History of the railways of Tottenham

Today

Tottenham is a multicultural hotspot with many different ethnic groups inhabiting the area, the largest groups are the African-Caribbean, West African, Albanian, Kurdish, Turkish-Cypriot, Turkish, Irish, and Portuguese populations. South Tottenham is reputed to be the most ethnically-diverse area in Europe, with up to 300 languages being spoken by its residents.[10] After Brixton, Tottenham probably has the largest Jamaican population as a percentage in the United Kingdom.[citation needed] Tottenham is also home to the largest population of Ghanaians in Europe.[citation needed]

More investment is slowly being pumped into Tottenham which is needed.[citation needed] Certain areas were becoming run down and crime levels were rising and this is due to the fact that Haringey, the London Borough of which Tottenham is a part, is classed as an Outer London borough and so obtains less funding than the inner-city boroughs, although it has exactly the same socioeconomic problems.[citation needed]

Public transport

Two London Underground Lines serve the Tottenham area. The Piccadilly Line, which opened in 1932 has one station Turnpike Lane which was the first Underground station within the Tottenham Borough boundaries. The Victoria Line which opened in 1968 has its operating depot in Tottenham at Northumberland Park and has two stations, Seven Sisters and Tottenham Hale situated within the area. National Rail stations, Seven Sisters, South Tottenham, Tottenham Hale, Bruce Grove, White Hart Lane and Northumberland Park serve the area. The train services are provided by National Express East Anglia and London Overground.

Districts

Sport

Tottenham is the home of Premier League football club Tottenham Hotspur. Tottenham are one of England's most successful club sides, having won the Football League twice, the FA Cup eight times, the UEFA Cup twice, the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup once and the Football League Cup, four times.[11] The club's home ground is White Hart Lane, located on Park Lane, rather than the road of the same name. The ground is named after the White Hart Inn that it was built behind, and the nearest station to the ground.[citation needed]

Notable people associated with Tottenham

Education

For details of education in Tottenham see the London Borough of Haringey article.

Neighbouring areas

External links

References


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

TOTTENHAM, an urban district in the Tottenham parliamentary division of Middlesex, England, forming a north suburb of London, 61 m. north of London Bridge, adjoining Edmonton on the south. Pop. (1901), 102,541. Its full name, not now in use, was Tottenham High Cross, from the cross near the centre of the township. The origin and significance of this cross are doubtful. The present structure was erected c. 1600, and ornamented with stucco in 1809. In the time of Isaak Walton there stood by it a shady arbour to which the angler was wont to resort. Formerly Tottenham was noted for its "greens," in the centre of one of which stood the famous old elm trees called the "Seven Sisters"; these were removed in 1840, but the name is preserved in the Seven Sisters Road. Bruce castle, on the site of the old mansion of the Bruces, but built probably by Sir William Compton in the beginning of the 16th century, was occupied by a boarding-school founded by Mr (afterwards Sir) Rowland Hill in 1827 on the system instituted by him at Hazlewood, Birmingham. It became public property in 1892. The church of All Hallows, Tottenham, was given by David, king of Scotland (c.1126), to the canons of the church of Holy Trinity, London. It retains Perpendicular portions, a south porch of brick of the 16th century and numerous ancient monuments and brasses. The grammar school was enlarged and endowed in 1686 by Sarah, dowager duchess of Somerset. The urban district formerly included Wood Green to the west, but this became a separate urban district in 1888 (pop. 34,233).

In the reign of Edward the Confessor the manor of Tottenham was possessed by Earl Waltheof. It was inherited by his daughter Maud, who was married first to Simon de St Liz and afterwards to David, son of Malcolm III., king of Scotland, who was created by Henry I. earl of Huntingdon, and received possession of all the lands formerly held by Earl Waltheof. The manor thus descended to William the Lion, king of Scotland, and was granted by him in 1184 to his brother David, earl of Angus and Galloway, the grant being confirmed in 1199 by King John of England, who created him earl of Huntingdon. He married Maud, heiress of Hugh, earl of Chester, and his son John inherited both earldoms. The son married Helen, daughter of Llewelyn, prince of Wales, by whom he was poisoned in 1237, dying without issue. She retained possession till 1254, when the manor was divided between his coheirs Robert de Brus, John de Baliol and Henry de Hastings, each division forming a distinct manor bearing the name of its owner. 1429 they were reunited in the possession of John Gedeney, alderman of London.

William Bedwell, the Arabic scholar, was vicar of Tottenham, and published in 1632 a Briefe Description of the Towne of Tottenham, in which he printed for the first time the burlesque poem, the Turnament of Tottenham.


<< Totonicapam

Tottenville >>


Simple English

Tottenham

File:Tottenham town hall
Tottenham Town Hall, now Haringey Council Offices


OS grid reference TQ335905
London borough Haringey
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LONDON
Postcode district N15, N17
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
UK Parliament Tottenham
London Assembly Enfield and Haringey
European Parliament London
List of places: UKEngland • London
Coordinates: 51°35′51″N 0°04′18″W / 51.5974°N 0.0716°W / 51.5974; -0.0716
File:1619 Tottenham map (full).jpg
Tottenham in 1619 (South shown at the top of the map).

Tottenham (pronounced /ˈtɒʔnəm/) is an urban area of North London, England in the London Borough of Haringey. It is situated 6.6 miles (10.6 km) north-east of Charing Cross.


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message