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Trace amine-associated receptors, abbreviated TAAR and otherwise known as trace amine receptors, abbreviated TAR or TA, are a class of G protein-coupled receptors identified in 2001.[1][2]

These receptors have gained considerable interest in academic and pharmaceutical industry research as putative endogenous receptors for trace amines, metabolic derivatives of classical biogenic amines and the psychostimulants amphetamine and methamphetamine.[2][3][4][5][6][7]

In 2004 it was shown that in mammals TAAR1 is probably a receptor for thyronamines, decarboxylated and deiodinated metabolites of the thyroid hormones,[3] while the mouse mTAAR2 - mTAAR9 receptors are most probably olfactory receptors for volatile amines.[8][9]

Contents

Mammalian TAAR complement

The following is a list of the TAARs contained in selected mammalian genomes:[10]

See also

External links

References

  1. ^ Borowsky B, Adham N, Jones KA, Raddatz R, Artymyshyn R, Ogozalek KL, Durkin MM, Lakhlani PP, Bonini JA, Pathirana S, Boyle N, Pu X, Kouranova E, Lichtblau H, Ochoa FY, Branchek TA, Gerald C (2001). "Trace amines: identification of a family of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98 (16): 8966–71. doi:10.1073/pnas.151105198. PMID 11459929.  
  2. ^ a b Bunzow JR, Sonders MS, Arttamangkul S, Harrison LM, Zhang G, Quigley DI, Darland T, Suchland KL, Pasumamula S, Kennedy JL, Olson SB, Magenis RE, Amara SG, Grandy DK (2001). "Amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, and metabolites of the catecholamine neurotransmitters are agonists of a rat trace amine receptor". Mol. Pharmacol. 60 (6): 1181–8.  
  3. ^ a b Scanlan TS, Suchland KL, Hart ME, Chiellini G, Huang Y, Kruzich PJ, Frascarelli S, Crossley DA, Bunzow JR, Ronca-Testoni S, Lin ET, Hatton D, Zucchi R, Grandy DK (2004). "3-Iodothyronamine is an endogenous and rapid-acting derivative of thyroid hormone". Nat. Med. 10 (6): 638–42. doi:10.1038/nm1051. PMID 15146179.  
  4. ^ Lindemann L, Hoener MC (2005). "A renaissance in trace amines inspired by a novel GPCR family". Trends Pharmacol. Sci. 26 (5): 274–81. doi:10.1016/j.tips.2005.03.007. PMID 15860375.  
  5. ^ Hart ME, Suchland KL, Miyakawa M, Bunzow JR, Grandy DK, Scanlan TS (2006). "Trace amine-associated receptor agonists: synthesis and evaluation of thyronamines and related analogues". J. Med. Chem. 49 (3): 1101–12. doi:10.1021/jm0505718. PMID 16451074.  
  6. ^ Wainscott DB, Little SP, Yin T, Tu Y, Rocco VP, He JX, Nelson DL (2007). "Pharmacologic characterization of the cloned human trace amine-associated receptor1 (TAAR1) and evidence for species differences with the rat TAAR1". J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 320 (1): 475–485. doi:10.1124/jpet.106.112532. PMID 17038507.  
  7. ^ Grandy DK (2007). "Trace amine-associated receptor 1-Family archetype or iconoclast?". Pharmacol. Ther. 116 (3): 355–390. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2007.06.007. PMID 17888514.  
  8. ^ Liberles SD, Buck LB (2006). "A second class of chemosensory receptors in the olfactory epithelium". Nature 442 (7103): 645–50. doi:10.1038/nature05066. PMID 16878137.  
  9. ^ Liberles SD (July 2009). "Trace amine-associated receptors are olfactory receptors in vertebrates". Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1170: 168–72. doi:10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.04014.x. PMID 19686131.  
  10. ^ Maguire JJ, Parker WA, Foord SM, Bonner TI, Neubig RR, Davenport AP (March 2009). "International Union of Pharmacology. LXXII. Recommendations for trace amine receptor nomenclature". Pharmacol. Rev. 61 (1): 1–8. doi:10.1124/pr.109.001107. PMID 19325074.  
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