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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Trademarkia is a free online public service that is the first to offer historical information about marks registered prior to the Great Depression. [1] Because many American industries and businesses failed during this era, historical information about the American Industrial Revolution was lost.[2] Until Trademarkia, this information was buried in national archives of the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, D.C. Trademarkia has indexed all U.S. federal Trademarks ever registered from 1870 to present.[3]

Contents

History and background

Advances in electronic and mechanical engineering created new industries and new technologies between 1870 and the Great Depression of the 1920’s.[4] During this time, American mass production manufacturing techniques combined with high availability of written content created new businesses and entrepreneurial opportunities.[5] During the Great Depression, millions of Americans were out of work and tens of thousands of businesses failed. Their legacy remained buried in federal U.S. archives until Trademarkia was created.[6]

Significance

In the past, U.S. trademark data was only available through a search of historical data available from the United States Patent and Trademark Office[7] or from paid subscription private databases such as LexisNexis, Dialog, or Compu-Mark. As part of a large-scale public initiative, Trademarkia amassed significant amount of unique historical and present data comprising more than 5,700,000 unique logos, names and logos never before electronically published by the United States Trademark Office[8]. Most notably, Trademarkia is significant because major publishers including Google have never before been able to surmount the enormity of the technical and logistical challenge of acquiring such information from disparate public sources[9].

Debate

Legal and industrial scholars have debated the virtue of new brand owners acquiring ownership interests in previously owned business names and slogans.[10] Some legal historians have debated the need for Trademarkia as it exposes historical information about brands for which a clear owner is no longer easily found.[11] This controversy has resulted in a cloud over the legitimacy of brand owners who have commercialized historical brand names and the ownership interest of marks shown on Trademarkia..[12] Others have commented that Trademarkia’s use of such historical brands falls within the purview of fair use since brand ownership has passed statutory limitations of enforceability..[13]

References

  1. ^ From The TC50 DemoPit, Trademarkia (TM) Simplifies Trademark Search [1](27 Sept 2000)
  2. ^ Concise History of Economics: the Great Depression: [2] (19 October 1999)
  3. ^ [http://www.altsearchengines.com/2009/09/19/trademark-search-engine-trademarkia-previews-free-version/
  4. ^ Concise History of Economics: the Great Depression: [3] (19 October 1999)
  5. ^ Concise History of Economics: the Great Depression: [4] (19 October 1999)
  6. ^ [http://www.altsearchengines.com/2009/09/19/trademark-search-engine-trademarkia-previews-free-version/
  7. ^ From The TC50 DemoPit, Trademarkia (TM) Simplifies Trademark Search [5](27 Sept 2000)
  8. ^ From The TC50 DemoPit, Trademarkia (TM) Simplifies Trademark Search [6](27 Sept 2000)
  9. ^ From The TC50 DemoPit, Trademarkia (TM) Simplifies Trademark Search [7](27 Sept 2000)
  10. ^ Harvard Law School, Reasonable intellectual property licensing: the key to maturity of software industry practices re: invention and intellectual property, Jim Moore, 2003. Cambridge, MA [8]
  11. ^ Bernstein, Michael. The Great Depression: Delayed Recovery and Economic Change in America, 1929-1939. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987.
  12. ^ Harvard Law School, Reasonable intellectual property licensing: the key to maturity of software industry practices re: invention and intellectual property, Jim Moore, 2003. Cambridge, MA [9]
  13. ^ Bernstein, Michael. The Great Depression: Delayed Recovery and Economic Change in America, 1929-1939. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Furthe reading

  • Concise History of Economics: the Great Depression: [10] (19 October 1999)
  • From The TC50 DemoPit, Trademarkia (TM) Simplifies Trademark Search [11](27 Sept 2000)
  • Trademark search engine Trademarkia previews free version: [12] (19 Sept 2000)
  • Bernstein, Michael. The Great Depression: Delayed Recovery and Economic Change in America, 1929-1939. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987.
  • Harvard Law School, Reasonable intellectual property licensing: the key to maturity of software industry practices re: invention and intellectual property, Jim Moore, 2003. Cambridge, MA [13]

External links

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