Tribadism: Wikis

  
  

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An illustration of two women engaged in the act of tribadism. In which, a woman rubs her vulva against the body of her partner for the purpose of sexual pleasure.

Tribadism (pronounced /ˈtrɪ bæd ɪzm/)[1] or tribbing, also known by the slang term scissoring, is a form of non-penetrative sex in which a woman rubs her vulva against her partner's body for sexual stimulation.[2][3] This may involve female-to-female genital contact or a female rubbing her vulva against her partner's thigh, arm or stomach; it can also refer to a masturbation technique in which a woman rubs her vulva against an inanimate object such as a bolster, in an effort to achieve orgasm. The term is most often used in the context of lesbian sex, but is not exclusive to lesbians.[citation needed]

Contents

History

In the sexuality of the ancient Romans, a tribas was a woman who wanted to be an active partner or "top" in intercourse. The Romans did not classify according to homosexuality and heterosexuality. They instead had words for the active partner and the passive one.

Until the 20th century, the term was used to refer to lesbian sexual practices in general. Therefore, lesbians were occasionally called tribades.[4]

Tribadism among bonobo females

This position is not exclusive to humans. Females of the bonobo species, found in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, also engage in female-female genital sex, usually known as GG rubbing (genito-genital).[5][6]

Safe sex issues

As with any exchange of bodily fluids during sexual activities, tribadism has the potential to transfer sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) if those are present in one or more of the partners. Participants have the option of safe sex practices.[7]

Tribadism in popular culture

DCNG-tribadisme.jpg

See also

References

  1. ^ Gould, George M. (1936). Gould's Pocket Medical Dictionary (10th rev. ed.). P. Blakiston's Son & Co. Ltd.. 
  2. ^ Cathy Winks and Anne Semans (2002). The Good Vibrations Guide to Sex (3rd ed.). Cleis Press. ISBN 1573441589. 
  3. ^ Lesbian Sex Question: Tribadism, accessed 18 December 2006.
  4. ^ Sihvola, Juha; Nussbaum, Martha Craven (2002). The sleep of reason: erotic experience and sexual ethics in ancient Greece and Rome. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-60915-4. 
  5. ^ de Waal FB (Mar 1995). "Bonobo sex and society" (reprint). Sci Am. 272 (3): 82–8. PMID 7871411. http://songweaver.com/info/bonobos.html. "Perhaps the bonobo's most typical sexual pattern, undocumented in any other primate, is genito-genital rubbing (or GG rubbing) between adult females. One female facing another clings with arms and legs to a partner that, standing on both hands and feet, lifts her off the ground". 
  6. ^ Paoli T, Palagi E, Tacconi G, Tarli SB (Apr 2006). "Perineal swelling, intermenstrual cycle, and female sexual behavior in bonobos (Pan paniscus)". Am J Primatol 68 (4): 333–47. doi:10.1002/ajp.20228. PMID 16534808. 
  7. ^ (See The Lesbian and Gay Foundation "Safer Sex" website for more information.)
  8. ^ Harrington, Richard (January 7, 2005), "Scissor Sisters: On the Cutting Edge", Washington Post, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53256-2005Jan6.html, retrieved 2008-09-17 
  9. ^ "Rise Above: The Tribe 8 Documentary", San Francisco Bay Guardian, 12 July 2006, http://www.sfbayguardian.com/entry.php?catid=4&entry_id=1108, retrieved 21 September 2007 







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