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Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie

Cover of the 2006 DVD release
Directed by Peter Kuran
Produced by Peter Kuran
Visual Concept Entertainment
Written by Scott Narrie
Don Pugsley
Narrated by William Shatner
Release date(s) September 29, 1995 (1995-09-29)
Running time 93 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie is a 1995 American documentary film directed by Peter Kuran and narrated by William Shatner. Using restored archive footage, the film traces the development of nuclear weapons and their testing, from America's Trinity test of 1945 (hence the title) to the first Chinese atomic bomb test in 1964. Kuran's commentary on the DVD version claims that the DVD replaces some of the original footage with better-quality versions.

Included is footage of nuclear tests starting with the May 1945 trial run to Trinity (the first atomic bomb), a 100 ton TNT blast used to scale and calibrate the Trinity device, and ending with the last U.S. atmospheric nuclear detonation (called Tightrope) of the Nike Hercules air defense missile in 1963. Also included are test series in the South Pacific, and footage of the firing of the U.S. Army's atomic cannon at the Nevada Test Site in 1953, and color images of multi-megaton high altitude air bursts over Johnston Island just before the limited test ban treaty went into effect (banning all except underground detonations) in 1963.

The film's publicity claims that much of the American footage is newly declassified and previously unseen. Kuran's research brought him into contact with many of the cameramen who photographed the American tests, leading to the production of another documentary, Atomic Filmmakers, which featured their reminiscences of working on the program. A new patented image restoration process was used for the first time to improve considerably the image quality of old and fading film stock.[1]

The film's music (composed by William Stromberg) was performed by the Moscow Symphony Orchestra, symbolizing the end of the cold war. The score was later used in some trailers for the X-Men movies.

References

  1. ^ Film Preservation / Color Restoration - VCEinc, VCE.com. Accessed December 30, 2009.

External links

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