Triple Gold Club: Wikis

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There are three components of the Triple Gold Club: (clockwise from top left) an Olympic Games gold medal, the Stanley Cup and a World Championship gold medal.

The Triple Gold Club is a term used to describe ice hockey players who have won an Olympic Games gold medal, a World Championship gold medal, and the Stanley Cup, the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL). The International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) considers them to be "the three most important championships available to the sport".[1]

Tomas Jonsson, Mats Näslund and Håkan Loob became the first members on 27 February 1994 when Sweden won the gold medal at the 1994 Winter Olympics. The term first entered popular use following the 2002 Winter Olympics, which saw the addition of the first Canadian members.[2][3][4] On 8 May 2007, the IIHF announced it would formalize the club and recognize the players who had won the three championships.[5][6][7] The ceremony was to take place in Canada during the 2008 World Championship but it was later changed to occur during the inaugural Victoria Cup, in September 2008.[7][8]

There are twenty-two members of the Triple Gold Club—nine Swedes, six Russians, five Canadians, and two Czechs. Six of the players are defencemen and the remaining players are forwards; no goaltenders have won all three championships.[1] Measuring from the time of their first victory of one of the three championships, Swedes Niklas Kronwall, Mikael Samuelsson and Henrik Zetterberg needed the least amount of time to join the club, winning the Olympics and World Championships in 2006 and the Stanley Cup in 2008 (as members of the Detroit Red Wings).[9] In contrast, it took Russian Viacheslav Fetisov 19 years from his first victory to become a member. Fetisov, his countryman Igor Larionov, and Swede Peter Forsberg are the only players to have won each of the three championships more than once. Eight members of the Triple Gold Club have won the Stanley Cup as part of the Detroit Red Wings, more than any other NHL team.

Contents

Components

The IIHF considers the three components of the club to be "the three most important championships available to the sport".[1] The club has been described as a "a modern fraternity" because before 1977, NHL players—considered professional—were not allowed to play in the world championships and until 1998 for the Olympics, which were intended for amateur players. Additionally, few Europeans played in the NHL before the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989.[1]

Olympic gold medal

Ice hockey tournaments have been staged at the Olympic Games since 1920. The men's tournament was first held at the 1920 Summer Olympics and integrated in the Winter Olympic program starting with the 1924 Winter Olympics.[10][11] The Olympic Games were originally intended for amateur athletes, so the players of the NHL and other professional leagues were not allowed to play. Canada dominated the first three decades, winning six of seven gold medals. The Soviet Union first participated in 1956 and overtook Canada as the dominant international team, winning seven of the nine tournaments in which they participated. At the 1980 Winter Olympics, the American team upset the Soviet Union in the "Miracle on Ice" and went on to win the gold medal. Other nations to win gold include Great Britain in 1936, Sweden in 1994 and 2006 and the Czech Republic in 1998.[12]

Many of Canada's top players were NHL professionals, so the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (CAHA) pushed for the ability to use professional and amateur players.[13] After several debates about the definition of what made a player professional, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) voted to allow all athletes to compete in Olympic Games held after 1988. The NHL was initially reluctant to allow its players to compete because the Olympics are held in the middle of the NHL season, and the league would have to halt play if many of its players participated. However, an agreement was reached and NHL players were allowed to compete starting in 1998.[14]

World Championship gold medal

The Ice Hockey World Championship is an annual tournament organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). It is the highest profile annual international tournament. The tournament held at the 1920 Summer Olympics is recognized as the first Ice Hockey World Championship. Between 1920 and 1968, the Olympic hockey tournament was also considered the World Championship for that year. The first World Championship that was held as an individual event was in 1930 in which twelve nations participated.[15] The modern format for the World Championship features 16 teams in the championship group, 12 teams in Division I and 12 teams in Division II. If there are more than 40 teams, the rest compete in Division III. The teams in the championship play a preliminary and qualifying round, then the top eight teams play in the playoff medal round and the winning team is crowned World Champion.[16]

Canada was the tournament's first dominant team, winning the tournament 12 times between 1930 and 1952. The Soviet Union first participated in 1954 and soon became rivals with Canada. From 1963 until the nation's breakup in 1991, the Soviet Union was the dominant team, winning 20 championships. During that period, only three other nations won medals: Canada, Czechoslovakia and Sweden. Russia first participated in 1992 and the Czech Republic and Slovakia started competing in 1993.[17] In the 2000s, the competition became more open as the "big six" teams–Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Sweden and the United States–as well as Slovakia became more evenly matched.[18]

Stanley Cup

The Stanley Cup is the championship trophy awarded annually to the National Hockey League (NHL) playoffs champion. The Stanley Cup is the oldest professional sports trophy in North America[19] and is surrounded by numerous legends and traditions, the oldest of which is the celebratory drinking of champagne out of the cup by the winning team. Unlike the trophies awarded by the other three major professional sports leagues of North America, a new Stanley Cup is not made each year; Cup winners keep it until a new champion is crowned.[20] It is the only trophy in professional sports that has the name of the winning players, coaches, management, and club staff engraved on its chalice.[19] The original bowl was made of silver and has a dimension of 18.5 centimeters (7.28 inches) in height and 29 centimeters (11.42 inches) in diameter. The current Stanley Cup, topped with a copy of the original bowl, is made of silver and nickel alloy. Today, it has a height of 89.54 centimeters (35.25 inches) and weighs 15.5 kilograms (34.5 lb).[21]

Originally inscribed the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup, the trophy was donated in 1892, by then Governor General of Canada Lord Stanley of Preston, as an award for Canada's top-ranking amateur ice hockey club.[22] In 1915, the two professional ice hockey organizations, the National Hockey Association (NHA) and the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA), reached a gentlemen's agreement in which their respective champions would face each other for the Stanley Cup. After a series of league mergers and folds, it became the de facto championship trophy of the NHL in 1926. The Cup later became the de jure NHL championship prize in 1947.[23]

Members

Key
 *  Player is a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame.[24]
Text in bold indicates the specific championship that made that player a member of the club.
Player Membership
gained
Olympic Gold World Championship Stanley Cup
Sweden Jonsson, TomasTomas Jonsson 01994-02-27 27 February 1994 Sweden 1994 Sweden 1991 New York Islanders 1982, 1983
Sweden Naslund, MatsMats Näslund 01994-02-27 27 February 1994 Sweden 1994 Sweden 1991 Montreal Canadiens 1986
Sweden Loob, HakanHåkan Loob 01994-02-27 27 February 1994 Sweden 1994 Sweden 1987, 1991 Calgary Flames 1989
Russia Kamensky, ValeriValeri Kamensky 01996-06-10 10 June 1996 USSR 1988 USSR 1986, 1989, 1990
Russia 1993
Colorado Avalanche 1996
Russia Gusarov, AlexeiAlexei Gusarov 01996-06-10 10 June 1996 USSR 1988, Unified Team 1992 USSR 1986, 1989, 1990 Colorado Avalanche 1996
Sweden Forsberg, PeterPeter Forsberg 01996-06-10 10 June 1996 Sweden 1994, 2006 Sweden 1992, 1998 Colorado Avalanche 1996, 2001
Russia Fetisov, ViacheslavViacheslav Fetisov * 01997-06-07 7 June 1997 USSR 1984, 1988 USSR 1978, 1981, 1982, 1983,
1986, 1989, 1990
Detroit Red Wings 1997, 1998
Russia Larionov, IgorIgor Larionov * 01997-06-07 7 June 1997 USSR 1984, 1988 USSR 1982, 1983, 1986, 1989 Detroit Red Wings 1997, 1998, 2002
Russia Mogilny, AlexanderAlexander Mogilny 02000-06-10 10 June 2000 USSR 1988 USSR 1989 New Jersey Devils 2000
Russia Malakhov, VladimirVladimir Malakhov 02000-06-10 10 June 2000 Unified Team 1992 USSR 1990 New Jersey Devils 2000
Canada Blake, RobRob Blake 02002-02-24 24 February 2002 Canada 2002 Canada 1994, 1997 Colorado Avalanche 2001
Canada Sakic, JoeJoe Sakic 02002-02-24 24 February 2002 Canada 2002 Canada 1994 Colorado Avalanche 1996, 2001
Canada Shanahan, BrendanBrendan Shanahan 02002-02-24 24 February 2002 Canada 2002 Canada 1994 Detroit Red Wings 1997, 1998, 2002
Canada Niedermayer, ScottScott Niedermayer 02004-05-09 9 May 2004 Canada 2002 Canada 2004 New Jersey Devils 1995, 2000, 2003
Anaheim Ducks 2007
Czech Republic Jagr, JaromirJaromír Jágr 02005-05-15 15 May 2005 Czech Republic 1998 Czech Republic 2005 Pittsburgh Penguins 1991, 1992
Czech Republic Slegr, JiriJiří Šlégr 02005-05-15 15 May 2005 Czech Republic 1998 Czech Republic 2005 Detroit Red Wings 2002
Sweden Lidstrom, NicklasNicklas Lidström 02006-02-26 26 February 2006 Sweden 2006 Sweden 1991 Detroit Red Wings 1997, 1998, 2002, 2008
Sweden Modin, FredrikFredrik Modin 02006-02-26 26 February 2006 Sweden 2006 Sweden 1998 Tampa Bay Lightning 2004
Canada Pronger, ChrisChris Pronger 02007-06-06 6 June 2007 Canada 2002 Canada 1997 Anaheim Ducks 2007
Sweden Kronwall, NiklasNiklas Kronwall 02008-06-04 4 June 2008 Sweden 2006 Sweden 2006 Detroit Red Wings 2008
Sweden Zetterberg, HenrikHenrik Zetterberg 02008-06-04 4 June 2008 Sweden 2006 Sweden 2006 Detroit Red Wings 2008
Sweden Samuelsson, MikaelMikael Samuelsson 02008-06-04 4 June 2008 Sweden 2006 Sweden 2006 Detroit Red Wings 2008

See also

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d Podnieks, Andrew (2008-03-25). "Triple Gold Goalies... not". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/home-of-hockey/news/news-singleview/browse/22/select_category/18/article/triple-gold-goalies-not.html. Retrieved 2009-02-08.  
  2. ^ Barnes, Don (2002-02-25). "Welcome to the Triple Gold Club: Blake, Sakic, Shanahan: New members to elite club: Olympics, worlds, Stanley Cup". National Post.  
  3. ^ Scanlan, Wayne (2002-02-24). "Triple Gold Club awaits Canadian trio". Edmonton Journal.  
  4. ^ Buffery, Steve (2001-12-26). "Skating a fine line". Toronto Sun. http://slam.canoe.ca/2002GamesColumnistsPreGames/buffery_dec26-sun.html. Retrieved 2009-02-09.  
  5. ^ Associated Press (2007-05-08). "Europe's top club to play an NHL team in new tournament". International Herald Tribune. http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/05/08/sports/EU-SPT-HKY-IIHF-NHL.php. Retrieved 2009-02-08.  
  6. ^ Associated Press (2007-05-08). "Winner of three-team tourney to get Victoria Cup". ESPN. http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2863711. Retrieved 2009-02-09.  
  7. ^ a b "Triple Gold Club expands to 22". International Ice Hockey Federation. 2008-06-05. http://www.iihf.com/home-of-hockey/news/news-singleview/article/triple-gold-club-expands-to-22/. Retrieved 2009-02-08.  
  8. ^ "PR & Media Activities". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/100-years/100-years-of-ice-hockey/pr-media-activities.html. Retrieved 2009-02-08.  
  9. ^ Cox, Damien (2008-06-06). "King Henrik of Hockeytown". Toronto Star. http://www.thestar.com/printArticle/438368. Retrieved 2009-02-08.  
  10. ^ "This Day in History 1924: First Winter Olympics". This day in History. A&E Television Networks. http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.do?action=Article&id=6787. Retrieved 2008-08-01.  
  11. ^ Hansen, Kenth (May 1996). "The Birth of Swedish Ice Hockey - Antwerp 1920" (PDF). Citius, Altius, Fortius (International Society of Olympic Historians) 4 (2): 5–27. http://www.la84foundation.org/SportsLibrary/JOH/JOHv4n2/JOHv4n2c.pdf.  
  12. ^ "Olympic ice hockey tournaments, men". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/history/all-medallists/olympics/men.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  13. ^ Podnieks, Andrew; Szemberg, Szymon (2008). "Story #17–Protesting amateur rules, Canada leaves international hockey". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-17.html. Retrieved 2009-03-01.  
  14. ^ Lapointe, Joe (1997-09-16). "The N.H.L.'s Olympic Gamble; Stars' Participation in Nagano Could Raise Sport's Profile". The New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9901EFD91438F935A2575AC0A961958260&n=Top%2FReference%2FTimes%20Topics%2FSubjects%2FO%2FOlympic%20Games. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  15. ^ "International hockey timeline". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/history/the-iihf/timeline.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  16. ^ "Tournament format". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/channels/iihf-world-championship-oc09/home/tournament-information/tournament-format.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  17. ^ "Past medalists". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/history/all-medallists/men.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  18. ^ Lapointe, Joe (2002-02-11). "Olympics: Hockey; N.H.L. and Its Teams Send Players to Bench". The New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9800E7D6103CF932A25751C0A9649C8B63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=1. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  19. ^ a b "Stanley Cup Fun Facts". National Hockey League. http://www.nhl.com/cup/fun_facts.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  20. ^ "One awesome job...". National Hockey League. http://www.nhl.com/hockeyu/history/cup/cupkeeper_mcgourty.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  21. ^ "Stanley Cup Engraving Facts, Firsts, and Faux Pas". Hockey Hall of Fame. http://www.legendsofhockey.net/html/silver_stFFFs.htm. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  22. ^ "The Stanley Cup". National Hockey League. http://www.nhl.com/cup/cup.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  23. ^ "Court:Non-NHL teams could vie for Cup". The Sports Network. 2006-02-07. http://web.archive.org/web/20071216083200/http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/news_story/?ID=153935&hubname=. Retrieved 2009-03-18.  
  24. ^ "List of honored Players". Hockey Hall of Fame. http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/LegendsOfHockey/jsp/LegendsMembersByYear.jsp?type=Player. Retrieved 2009-02-08.  

External links


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