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Tunis - Carthage International Airport
Aéroport international de Tunis-Carthage
مطار تونس قرطاج الدولي
Tunis-Carthage International Airport (Terminal 2).jpg
Terminal 2
IATA: TUNICAO: DTTA
Summary
Airport type Public
Operator Tunisian Civil Aviation & Airports Authority
Location Tunis, Tunisia
Elevation AMSL 22 ft / 7 m
Coordinates 36°51′04″N 10°13′38″E / 36.85111°N 10.22722°E / 36.85111; 10.22722
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
01/19 3,200 10,499 Asphalt
11/29 2,840 9,318 Asphalt
Source: DAFIF[1][2]
Tunis-Carthage International Airport is located in Tunisia
Tunis-Carthage International Airport
Location of Tunis-Carthage International Airport, Tunisia

Tunis - Carthage International Airport (French: Aéroport international de Tunis-Carthage, Arabic: مطار تونس قرطاج الدولي‎) (IATA: TUNICAO: DTTA) is the international airport serving Tunis in Tunisia.[3]

The airport is named for the historic city of Carthage, located just north of the airport. It is the base of operations for four airlines: Tunisair, Nouvelair Tunisia, Sevenair and Tunisavia. In 2007, it served 3,930,661 passengers.

All ground handling is provided by Tunisair Handling, a 100% subsidiary of Tunisair, and security services are provided by the Police and the Customs.

The airport is served by bus, taxi, but not by railway.

Contents

Airlines and destinations

The following scheduled passenger airlines use Tunis-Carthage International Airport (as of February 2010):

Airlines Destinations
Air Algérie Algiers
Air Berlin Cologne/Bonn
Air Europa Barcelona, Madrid
Air France Lyon, Marseille, Nice, Paris-Charles de Gaulle
Air Malta Malta
Air Méditerranée Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Paris-Orly
Air One Milan-Malpensa [begins 28 March]
Alitalia Milan-Malpensa [ends 27 March], Rome-Fiumicino
British Airways London-Gatwick
Buraq Air Benghazi, Tripoli
Corsairfly Paris-Orly
EgyptAir Cairo
Emirates Dubai, Tripoli
Jat Airways Belgrade [seasonal]
Jetairfly Brussels
Karthago Airlines Copenhagen, Moscow-Domodedovo, Stockholm-Arlanda, Tripoli
Libyan Airlines Benghazi, Tripoli
Lufthansa Frankfurt
Luxair Luxembourg [seasonal]
Nayzak Air Transport Benghazi, Tripoli
Nouvelair Monastir
Qatar Airways Doha
Royal Air Maroc Casablanca
Royal Air Maroc Express Casablanca [begins 16 June]
Royal Jordanian Amman
Saudi Arabian Airlines Jeddah, Medina
Sevenair Djerba, Gabès, Gafsa, Malta, Monastir, Tabarka, Tozeur, Tripoli
Tunisair Abidjan, Algiers, Amman, Amsterdam, Athens, Bahrain, Bamako, Barcelona, Beirut, Belgrade, Benghazi, Berlin-Schönefeld, Bordeaux, Brussels, Cairo, Casablanca, Copenhagen, Dakar, Damascus, Dubai, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hamburg, Istanbul-Atatürk, Jeddah, Kiev-Boryspil, Kuwait, Lisbon, London-Heathrow, Luxembourg, Lyon, Madrid, Marseille, Milan-Malpensa, Munich, Nice, Nouakchott, Oran, Palermo, Paris-Orly, Rome-Fiumicino, Stockholm-Arlanda, Strasbourg, Toulouse, Tripoli, Vienna, Warsaw, Zurich
Turkish Airlines Istanbul-Atatürk
XL Airways France Paris-Charles de Gaulle

World War II

Air Transport Command Routes

During World War II, the airport was used by the United States Army Air Force Twelfth Air Force during the Italian Campaign in 1943 as a headquarters and command control base. The following known units were assigned:[4]

Once the combat units moved to Italy, Air Transport Command used the airport as a major transshipment hub for cargo, transiting aircraft and personnel. It functioned as a stopover en-route to Algiers airport or to Mellaha Field near Tripoli on the North African Cairo-Dakar transport route, Later, as the Allied forces advanced, it also flew personnel and cargo to Naples, Italy.

Notable incidents

On May 7, 2002, an EgyptAir Boeing 737 attempting to land from Cairo crashed 4 miles from the airport, killing 14 of the 62 people on board.

See also


References

  1. ^ Airport information for DTTA at World Aero Data. Data current as of October 2006.. Source: DAFIF.
  2. ^ Airport information for TUN at Great Circle Mapper. Source: DAFIF (effective Oct. 2006).
  3. ^ Tunis - Carthage International Airport at Office de l'Aviation Civile et des Aeroports (OACA)
  4. ^ Maurer, Maurer. Air Force Combat Units of World War II. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History, 1983. ISBN 0-89201-092-4.

External links

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