The Full Wiki

More info on Turks in Kazakhstan

Turks in Kazakhstan: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Turks in Kazakhstan
Total population
50,000 (1989 census)[1]
150,000 (2006 estimate) [2]
Plus 9,593 Turkish nationals[3]
Regions with significant populations
Almaty  · South Kazakhstan  · Zhambil  · Qyzylorda
Languages

Turkish

Religion

Islam

Turks in Kazakhstan are either Turkish people who live in Kazakhstan even though having been born outside Kazakhstan, or are Kazakhstan-born, but have Turkish roots. By Turkish roots, this could mean roots linking back to Turkey, or in neighbouring countries once part of the Ottoman Empire that still have a population whose language is Turkish or who claims a Turkish identity or cultural heritage.

Contents

History

The majority of Turks were deported from south-western Georgia to Central Asia in 1944, where they were employed largely in the agricultural sector in grain and livestock production. Of the 207,500 Meskhetian Turks registered in the 1989 Soviet census over 23.8% were registered in Kazakhstan.[4]

Demographics

Population of Turks in Kazakhstan according to Soviet Censuses
Year Population
1970 18,397
1979 25,820
1989 49,567

Although the last Soviet census recorded a low figure of 207,269 Turks, this may have not counted all ethnic Turks, because for many years, Turks were denied the right to register their nationality in legal documents. Thus, in Kazakhstan, only a third of them were recorded as Turks on their passports. The rest had been arbitrarily declared members of other ethnic groups.[5][6]

As of 2005, there are 150,000 Turks who reside in Kazakhstan. 45,000 in Almaty, 40,000 in South Kazakhstan, 36,000 in Zhambil and 10,000 in Qyzylorda.[7]

Education

The Hoca Ahmet Yesevi International Kazakh-Turkish University was established in Turkistan of Kazakhstan in 1993 and has around 20,000 students. It is one of the leading universities in the country. There is also 28 Kazakh-Turkish high schools, one university and one primary school which are operated by private Turkish foundations. There is also one Turkish Language Teaching Center in Almaty.

See also

References

Bibliography

  • Atabaki, Touraj; Mehendale, Sanjyot (2005), Central Asia and the Caucasus: transnationalism and diaspora, Routledge, ISBN 0415332605 .
  • Aydıngün, Ayşegül; Harding, Çigğdem Balım; Hoover, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Igor; Swerdlow, Steve (2006), Meskhetian Turks: An Introduction to their History, Culture, and Resettelment Experiences, http://www.cal.org/: Center for Applied Linguistics 
  • Babak, Vladimir; Vaisman, Demian; Wasserman, Aryeh (2004), Political Organization in Central Asia and Azerbaijan: Sources and Documents, Routledge, ISBN 0714648388 .
  • Blacklock, Denika (2005), FINDING DURABLE SOLUTIONS FOR THE MESKHETIANS, http://www.ecmi.de/: EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR MINORITY ISSUES 
  • Council of Europe (2006), Documents: working papers, 2005 ordinary session (second part), 25-29 April 2005, Vol. 3: Documents 10407, 10449-10533, Council of Europe, ISBN 9287157545 .
  • Council of Europe (2007), Parliamentary Assembly: Working Papers 2007 Ordinary Session 22-26 January 2007, Council of Europe, ISBN 9287161917 .
  • Khazanov, Anatoly Michailovich (1995), After the USSR: ethnicity, nationalism and politics in the Commonwealth of Independent States, University of Wisconsin Press, ISBN 0299148947 .
  • Minahan, James (1998), Miniature Empires: A Historical Dictionary of the Newly Independent States, Greenwood Publishing Group, ISBN 0313306109 .

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message