The Full Wiki

More info on U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea

U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) was founded in October 2001. The group's aim is to "raise awareness about conditions in North Korea and to publish research focusing world attention on human rights abuses in that country. At the same time, the Committee is trying to find creative solutions for improving human rights in North Korea."

Published reports include: The Hidden Gulag: Exposing North Korea's Prison Camps Prisoners' Testimonies and Satellite Photographs (2003); Hunger and Human Rights: The Politics of Famine in North Korea (2005); Failure to Protect: A Call to the UN Security Council to Act in North Korea (2006); The North Korean Refugee Crisis: Human Rights and International Response (2006); Legal Strategies for Protecting Human Rights in North Korea (2007).

Publications

The Hidden Gulag: Exposing North Korea's Prison Camps Prisoners' Testimonies and Satellite Photographs is authored by former Executive Director of Amnesty International, USA, David Hawk (2003). HRNK summarizes the report as follows: "A report documenting that the government of North Korea (DPRK) operates a vast and inhumane prison system for political prisoners. Satellite photography and testimony from escaped former prisoners reveal that North Korea has between 150,000 and 200,000 political prisoners working as slave laborers in prison colonies known as kwan-li-so."

Hunger and Human Rights: The Politics of Famine in North Korea is written by Stephan Haggard and Marcus Noland (2005). The report links "an absence of human rights to the severity of the famine and to chronic food-shortage problems afflicting the country."

Failure to Protect: A Call to the UN Security Council to Act in North Korea (2006), authored by Václav Havel (former President of the Czech Republic), Kjell Magne Bondevik (former Prime Minister of Norway), and Elie Wiesel (Nobel Peace Prize Laureate), is highly critical of human rights conditions in North Korea and argues that the UN Security Council should "adopt a non-punitive resolution on the situation in North Korea in accordance with its authority under Chapter VI of the UN Charter and past Security Council precedents" in which conditions aimed at addressing human rights violations are met.

The North Korean Refugee Crisis: Human Rights and International Response (2006), by Stephan Haggard and Marcus Noland, examines the "plight of those determined escapees and the extraordinary problems they face once they have cleared what becomes only the preliminary hurdle of crossing the border."

The report,Legal Strategies for Protecting Human Rights in North Korea (2007), describes itself as serving "as a handbook for groups seeking to use the international legal system to advance human rights in North Korea."

References

See also

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message