Ubisoft Entertainment: Wikis

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Ubisoft Entertainment S.A.
Type Public
Founded 1986
Headquarters Original Headquaters
Montreuil-sous-Bois, France
International Headquarters
Bucharest, Romania
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Fusionopolis, Singapore
Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Key people Yves Guillemot, CEO
Yannis Mallat, CEO of Montreal Studio
Michel Ancel, Game designer
Industry Interactive entertainment
Products Rayman
Assassin's Creed series
Beyond Good & Evil
Blazing Angels
Brothers in Arms
Far Cry series
Might and Magic
Myst
Prince of Persia
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six
Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell
Tom Clancy's H.A.W.X.
Revenue 1,058 billion sales (2009) $1.4 billion[1]
Operating income €155 million
Net income €109.8 million
Employees 5,750 [2]
Website www.ubi.com
www.ubisoftgroup.com

Ubisoft Entertainment S.A. (Euronext: UBI) (pronounced /ˈjuːbisɒft/ YOU-bee-soft[3]) is a French computer and video game publisher and developer with headquarters in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. The company has a worldwide presence with studios in 17 countries and subsidiaries in 28 countries.[2]

As of 2008, it was the third-largest independent video game publisher in Europe, and the fourth largest in the United States.[2] Ubisoft's revenue for 2002-2003 was 453 million; for fiscal year 2003-2004, this grew to €508 million. As of 2009, Ubisoft employed more than 5,750 people, of which over 4,800 are classed as working in production.[2] The company's largest development studio is Ubisoft Montreal, which in 2004 employed approximately 1,600 people.[4] Yves Guillemot, a founding brother, was the chairman and CEO. As for 2008–2009, Ubisoft's revenue was €1,058 million, reaching the 1 billion euro milestone for the first time in its history.

Contents

History

The five brothers of the Guillemot family founded Ubisoft as a computer game publisher in 1986 in France (Brittany). Yves Guillemot soon made deals with Electronic Arts, Sierra On-Line, and MicroProse to distribute their games in France. By the end of the decade, Ubisoft began expanding to other markets, including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany.[5]

In the early 1990s, Ubisoft initiated its in-house game development program which led to the 1994 opening of a studio in Montreuil, France, which later became their headquarters. Ubisoft became a publicly traded company in 1996 and continued to expand to offices around the globe, opening locations in Shanghai and Montreal.

In 2000, Ubisoft had acquired Red Storm Entertainment.[6]

In February 2001, they acquired Düsseldorf, Germany based Blue Byte Software.[7]

In March 2001, Gores Technology Group sold The Learning Company's entertainment division (which includes games originally published by Brøderbund Software, Mattel, Mindscape and Strategic Simulations, Inc.) to them. The sale included the rights to IPs such as the Myst and Prince of Persia series.[8]

In October 2001, they acquired Gamebusters and move them to the German Offices.[9]

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Ubisoft committed itself to online games by getting behind Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, The Matrix Online, and the European and Chinese operation of EverQuest. The publisher established ubi.com as its online division. However, in February 2004, Ubisoft cancelled the online portion of Uru and backed out of the publishing deal on The Matrix Online. Nevertheless, a mere week later, the company announced its acquisition of Wolfpack Studios, developer of Shadowbane.

In December 2004, a rival game corporation Electronic Arts purchased a 19.9% stake in the firm, an action Ubisoft referred to as "hostile" on EA's part.[10]

In March 2005, Ubisoft acquired part of MC2-Microïds (Microïds Canada) and integrated it into Ubisoft Montreal.[11]

In July 2006 Ubisoft also bought the Driver franchise from Atari for a sum of €19 million (USD$24 million) in cash for the franchise, technology rights, and most asset. Additionally, though Ubisoft is not acquiring the studio outright, the members of Driver developer Reflections Interactive became employees of Ubisoft. As a result, Reflections Interactive was subsequently renamed Ubisoft Reflections.

On 11 April 2007, Ubisoft announced that it had acquired German game developer Sunflowers,[12] followed by an acquisition of Japanese developer Digital Kids that November.[13]

Ubisoft is also responsible for publishing famous franchises produced by other important studios for some specific platforms, such as Resident Evil 4 for PC, which is a Capcom production, and Innocent Life: A Futuristic Harvest Moon for PlayStation 2 and Harvest Moon Online, which are Marvelous Interactive productions.

On 10 November 2008, Ubisoft acquired Massive Entertainment from Activision.[14]

Studios

As one of the largest video game companies in the world, Ubisoft studios employs the second largest amount of in-house development staff in the world and has several divisions and offices throughout the world.[2] While some were founded by Ubisoft, others have been acquired over time. Some of these studios are:

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Current

Defunct

Games

Upcoming games

2010

  • Assassins Creed II Episodes (PC, Xbox 360, PS3)
  • Battle of Giants: Mutant Insects (DS)
  • Prince of Persia: The Forgotten Sands (PC, Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, PSP, DS)
  • Pure Football (PC, Xbox 360, PS3)
  • Red Steel 2 (Wii)
  • R.U.S.E. (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)
  • The Settlers 7: Paths to a Kingdom (PC)
  • Silent Hunter V: Battle of the Atlantic (PC)
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
  • Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction (PC, Xbox 360)
  • Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier (PC, Xbox 360, PS3)[24]
  • TrackMania Wii (Wii)

2011

Unknown date

Upcoming motion pictures

Game engines

Ubisoft utilizes a multitude of engines. In the current generation, it has licensed third party engines like Epic's Games' Unreal Engine 2.5 (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Double Agent, Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction), Unreal Engine 3.0 (Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Vegas, and Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Vegas 2, Brothers in Arms: Hell's Highway), GRIN's Diesel Engine (Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter (PC), Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter 2 (PC)), and the CryEngine (Far Cry Instincts) Onyx Engine was used in several 2007 DS and PSP releases; Cranium Kabookii, Chessmaster: The Art of Learning (DS), Surf's Up (DS and PSP), and TMNT (DS and PSP).[citation needed]

In addition, it has utilized proprietary and first party technology, including: the Anvil engine (Assassin's Creed, Prince of Persia, Shaun White Snowboarding, Assassin's Creed 2), the YETI engine (Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter,Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter 2, America's Army: True Soldiers, Beowulf, Lost: Via Domus), the Jade engine (Peter Jackson's King Kong: The Official Game of the Movie, Beyond Good & Evil, Rayman Raving Rabbids, TMNT, Rayman Raving Rabbids 2, Naruto: Rise of a Ninja, Naruto: The Broken Bond), the LyN engine (Rabbids Go Home, Red Steel 2), and the Dunia engine (Far Cry 2).

Uplay

With the release of Assassin's Creed II in 2009, Ubisoft launched the Uplay network, which is activated either in-game or via the Uplay website.[26] Uplay allows players to connect with other gamers, and to earn rewards based on achievements in Uplay enabled games, with Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot stating that "the more you play, the more free goods you will be able to have".[27]

Controversies

Ubisoft had, for a time, used the controversial StarForce copy restriction technology that installs hidden drivers on a system and is known to cause some hardware problems and compatibility issues with certain operating systems, starting with the game Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory, which was not compatible with Windows XP Professional x64 Edition for quite some time, until a patch was released by the makers of StarForce.[28] On 14 April 2006, Ubisoft confirmed that they would stop using StarForce on their games, citing complaints from customers.[29]

In the February 2008 issue of Electronic Gaming Monthly, Editor-in-Chief Dan “Shoe” Hsu asserted that Ubisoft had ceased to provide all Ubisoft titles to the EGM for any coverage purposes as a result of prior critical previews and negative reviews.[30][31]

Yves Guillemot, the CEO of Ubisoft, was quoted in the company's third-quarter 2008-09 sales report as saying "as some of our games did not meet the required quality levels to achieve their full potential, they need more sales promotions than anticipated."[32]

In January 2010, Ubisoft has announced the Online Services Platform, which forces customers to not only authenticate on the first game launch, but to remain online continually while playing, with the game even pausing if network connection is lost. This makes it impossible to play the game offline, to resell it, and means that should Ubisoft's servers go down, the game will be unplayable.[33] In February 2010, review versions of Assassin's Creed II and Settlers 7 for PC contained this new DRM scheme, confirming that it is already in use, and that instead of pausing the game, it would discard all progress since the last checkpoint or save game.[34]

In March 2010 outages to the Ubisoft DRM servers were reported, causing legitimate buyers to be unable to play Assassin's Creed 2 and Silent Hunter 5 games. Ubisoft claimed the outages were caused by denial-of-service attacks.[35]

Lawsuits

In 2008, Ubisoft sued Optical Experts Manufacturing (OEM), a DVD Duplication company for $25 million plus damages for the leak and distribution of its Assassins Creed PC game. The lawsuit claims that OEM did not take proper measures to protect its product as stated in its contract with Ubisoft. The complaint also alleges that OEM admitted to all the problems in the complaint.[36]

See also

References

  1. ^ Nunneley, Stephany (2009-04-29). "Ubisoft sales for Q4 show increase of 14% to $1.4 billion". videogaming247. http://www.vg247.com/2009/04/29/ubisoft-sales-for-q4-show-increase-of-14-14-million/. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "At a glance". Ubisoft. 2009-04. http://www.ubisoftgroup.com/index.php?p=65&art_id=. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  3. ^ Stephen Totilo (publisher), Alexandre Amancio, Clint Hocking, and Louis-Pierre Pharand. (2007-09-17). How To Pronounce… “Ubisoft” (The Official Explanation). [Video]. MTV Networks. Event occurs at 0:22. http://multiplayerblog.mtv.com/2007/09/17/how-to-pronounce-ubisoft-the-official-explanation. Retrieved 2009-07-03. 
  4. ^ French, Michael (2007-02-07). "Ubisoft Montreal to become world's biggest studio". Develop Magazine. http://www.developmag.com/news/25657/3839m-to-help-add-1000-jobs-at-Ubisoft-Montreal. Retrieved 2007-11-01. 
  5. ^ "History". Ubisoft. http://www.ubisoftgroup.com/index.php?p=66&art_id=. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  6. ^ "Ubi Soft Acquires Red Storm Entertainment". Blue's News. 2000-08-29. http://www.bluesnews.com/a/60. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  7. ^ Ho, Jennifer (2001-02-09). "Ubi Soft acquires Blue Byte Software". Gamespot. http://www.gamespot.com/news/2683947.html. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  8. ^ "Ubi Soft Acquires The Learning Company's Entertainment Division". GameZone. 2001-03-07. http://www.gamezone.com/news/03_07_01_11_45AM.htm. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i "History for Ubisoft Entertainment SA". MobyGames. http://www.mobygames.com/company/ubisoft-entertainment-sa/history. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  10. ^ Feldman, Curt (2004-12-20). "Electronic Arts buys stake in Ubisoft in "hostile" act". Gamespot. http://www.gamespot.com/news/6115370.html. Retrieved 2007-11-09. 
  11. ^ "Ubisoft Montreal enters into an agreement to acquire Microids Canada's development operations". Ubisoft. 2005-03-02. http://www.ubi.com/ENCA/News/Info.aspx?nId=2028. Retrieved 2007-11-09. 
  12. ^ "Ubisoft Acquires SunFlowers, Anno Franchise". Gamasutra. 11 April 2007. http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=13483. Retrieved 2007-04-12. 
  13. ^ "Ubisoft Buys Japanese Studio". GameTab. 2007-11-05. http://www.gametab.com/news/1096915/. Retrieved 2007-11-05. 
  14. ^ Ubisoft (2008-11-10). "Ubisoft acquires the assets of Massive Entertainment". Press release. http://www.ubisoftgroup.com/index.php?p=59&art_id=60&vars=Y29tX2lkPTU5OCZzZW5kZXI9SE9NRSZzZW5kZXJfdXJsPWluZGV4LnBocCUzRnNpdF9pZCUzRDImZmlsdGVyX3R5cGU9JmZpbHRlcl9tb250aD0mZmlsdGVyX3llYXI9&PHPSESSID=a43273f204f3657c74e1b50bf4668202. Retrieved 2009-02-24. 
  15. ^ "Related Designs Software GmbH". MobyGames. http://www.mobygames.com/company/related-designs-software-gmbh. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  16. ^ "Ubisoft acquires Sunflowers, takes stake in Related Designs". Spong. 2007-04-12. http://news.spong.com/press_release/12279/Ubisoft-acquires-Sunflowers-takes-stake-in-Related-Designs. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  17. ^ Boyes, Emma (April 15, 2008). "Ubisoft orders Indian takeaway". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/news/6189260.html?tag=result;title;1. Retrieved 2008-09-11. 
  18. ^ "Ubisoft Divertissements Inc.". MobyGames. http://www.mobygames.com/company/ubisoft-divertissements-inc. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  19. ^ "UBISOFT OUVRE OFFICIELLEMENT SES PORTES À QUÉBEC" (in French). Ubisoft. 2005-06-01. http://www.ubi.com/FRCA/News/Info.aspx?nId=3261. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  20. ^ "Ubisoft São Paulo". MobyGames. http://www.mobygames.com/company/ubisoft-so-paulo. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  21. ^ Sharma, Money (2008-06-17). "Q & A with Ubisoft Singapore Managing Director Olivier de Rotalier". Animation Xpress. http://www.animationxpress.com/anex/y2k8/headlines/anex3528.htm. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  22. ^ "Academy of Champions Announced". Gaming Union. May 20, 2009. http://www.gamingunion.net/news/academy-of-champions-announced--85.html. 
  23. ^ Sinclair, Brendan (2006-03-30). "Wolfpack Studios being shut down". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/news/6146792.html. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  24. ^ "Ghost Recon Future Soldier teaser". http://www.joystiq.com/2010/02/09/get-a-taste-of-the-future-ghost-recon-future-soldier-teaser/. Retrieved 10 February 2010. 
  25. ^ Kietzmann, Ludwig (13 January 2010). "Raving Rabbids 4, new Driver planned for Ubisoft's fiscal 2010-11". Joystiq. http://www.joystiq.com/2010/01/13/raving-rabbids-4-new-driver-planned-for-ubisofts-fiscal-2010/. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  26. ^ "Assassin’s Creed II and Splinter Cell to feature Uplay system". 21 November 2009. 
  27. ^ "Ubisoft: All Our Games Will Do This UPlay Thing". http://www.kotaku.com.au/2009/11/ubisoft-all-our-games-will-do-this-uplay-thing/. Retrieved 26 November 2009. 
  28. ^ "StarForce website page about patch". http://www.star-force.com/protection.phtml?c=83&id=1052. 
  29. ^ Thorsen, Tor (2006-04-14). "Ubisoft officially dumps Starforce". Gamespot. http://www.gamespot.com/news/6147655.html. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  30. ^ Plunkett, Luke (2008-01-08). "3 Companies Bar EGM From Coverage Following Poor Reviews". Kotaku. http://kotaku.com/342519/3-companies-bar-egm-from-coverage-following-poor-reviews. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  31. ^ Hsu, Dan (2008-01-09). "Banned". 1UP.com. http://www.1up.com/do/blogEntry?bId=8568051&publicUserId=5379799. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  32. ^ "Ubisoft 3rd-quarter 2008-09 sales report" (pdf). Ubisoft. 2009-01-22. http://www.euronext.com/fic/000/043/570/435703.pdf. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  33. ^ "Online Services Platform Q&A". Ubisoft. http://support.uk.ubi.com/online-services-platform/. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  34. ^ Francis, Tom (2010-02-17). "Constant net connection required to play Assassin's Creed 2 on PC". PC Gamer. http://www.computerandvideogames.com/article.php?id=235290&site=pcg. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 
  35. ^ "Ubisoft's official Twitter post regarding attacks.". http://twitter.com/Ubisoft/status/10184920360. 
  36. ^ "Ubisoft vs OEM". http://www.piracyisacrime.org/In-The-Courtroom/ubisoft-inc-vs-optical-experts-manufacturing-inc.html. 

External links


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Category:Ubisoft Entertainment article)

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Ubisoft Entertainment
Ubisoft Entertainment's company logo.
Founded 1986
Located Montreuil, France
Website http://ubi.com/

Ubisoft Entertainment was founded in 1986 as a videogame publisher, under the name Ubi Soft. The company made deals with several large publishers, including Electronic Arts, to distribute games in France and by the start of the 1990s had moved into Germany, the UK and the United States.

Ubisoft's first in-house development team was started in 1994 in Montreuil, which then became the company's headquarters. Ubisoft later acquired other development teams, starting with Rainbow Six developer Red Storm in 2000, and by 2003 the company was operating in over 22 countries worldwide.

Pages in category "Ubisoft Entertainment"

The following 85 pages are in this category, out of 85 total.

A

B

C

D

E

F

H

H cont.

I

J

L

M

  • Myst V: End of Ages

N

P

  • Pawly Pets: My Animal Hospital
  • Peter Jackson's King Kong: The Official Game of the Movie
  • Petz: Catz 2 (DS)
  • Petz: Dogz 2 (DS)
  • Petz: Dogz 2 and Catz 2
  • Petz: Dogz 2 and Catz 2 (PC)
  • Petz: Dogz Fashion
  • Petz: Monkey Madness
  • Petz: My Kitten Family
  • Petz: My Monkey Family
  • Petz: My Puppy Family
  • Pippa Funnell: Take the Reins
  • Pirates of the Caribbean: The Legend of Jack Sparrow
  • Prince of Persia (2008)
  • Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time

P cont.

  • Prince of Persia: The Two Thrones
  • Prince of Persia: Warrior Within

R

S

  • Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith
  • Star Wars: Lethal Alliance

T

W

X


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Ubisoft
Type S.A
Founded 1986
Headquarters Montreuil, France
Products FarCry

Ghost Recon

Prince of Persia

RayMan

Splinter Cell

Parent Company N/A
Website http://www.ubi.com

http://www.ubisoftgroup.com/


Ubisoft Entertainment (formerly Ubi Soft) is a computer and video game publisher and developer headquarted in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. The company has facilities in over 20 countries, including development studios in Montreal, Quebec; Barcelona, Catalonia; North Carolina; Dÿƿÿ¼sseldorf, Germany; and Milan, Italy, amongst other locations. As of 2004, it is the third-largest independent video game publisher in Europe, and the seventh largest in the United States of America.

History

The five brothers of the Guillemot family founded Ubisoft as a computer game publisher in 1986 in France. Yves Guillemot soon makes deals with Electronic Arts, Sierra On-Line, and Microprose to distribute their games in France. By the end of the decade, Ubisoft began expanding to other markets, including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany.

In the early 1990s, Ubisoft initiated its in-house game development program which led to the 1994 opening of a studio in Montreuil, France, which later became their headquarters. That same year, Michel Ancel created the Rayman character, a character which still stars in new video games as of 2004. Ubisoft became a publicly traded company in 1996 and continued to expand to offices around the globe, opening locations in Shanghai and Montreal.

In 2000, Ubisoft acquired US-based Red Storm Entertainment, the game development studio founded by techno-spy novelist Tom Clancy, already famous in its own right for games based on Clancy's books. In 2001, the company purchased Blue Byte Software, known for the Settlers series. By 2003, Ubisoft reported operations in 22 countries, nine of those containing production or design offices. Ubisoft had a number of successful and award-winning games that year, including Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell, Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time, XIII, Rayman 3, and Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3: Raven Shield and Beyond Good & Evil.

Ubisoft's revenue for 2002-2003 was 453 million euros; for fiscal year 2003-2004, this grew to 508 million euros. As of 2004, Ubisoft employs more than 2,350 people, of which over 1700 are classed as working in production. Yves Guillemot, a founding brother, is the chairman and CEO.

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Ubisoft committed itself to online games by getting behind Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, The Matrix Online, and the European and Chinese operation of EverQuest. The publisher established ubi.com as its online division. But in February 2004, Ubisoft cancelled the online portion of Uru and backed out of the publishing deal on The Matrix Online. Regardless, only a week later the company announced its acquisition of Wolfpack Studios, developers of fantasy MMORPG Shadowbane, and in July 2004, its Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow was released for the Xbox and PlayStation 2 with what some considered a revolutionary online multiplayer feature.

On December 20, 2004 Electronic Arts (EA) purchased a 19.9% stake in the firm. At the time, Ubisoft released a statement saying they considered the purchase "hostile" until they had further information on EA's intent.

Games developed/published by Ubisoft

This is a partial list of games developed and/or published by Ubisoft.

  • Advance Guardian Heroes (2004) — GBA
  • Alexander (2004) — PC
  • Ape Escape: Pumped & Primed (2004) — PS2
  • Asphalt Urban GT (2004) — DS
  • Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance (2004) — GBA
  • Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu (2003) — Xbox, PS2
  • Beyond Good & Evil (2003) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Brothers in Arms: Road to Hill 30 (2005) — Xbox, PC
  • Capitalism 2 (2001) — PC
  • Catz 5 (2002) — PC
  • Chessmaster 10th Edition (2004) — PC
  • Chessmaster 9000 (2002) — PC, Mac
  • Chessmaster (2003/2004) — Xbox, PS2, PC
  • Conflict Zone (2001) — PS2
  • Conquest: Frontier Wars (2001) — PC
  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2003) — Xbox, PS2, GBA
  • CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2004) — Xbox, PC
  • CSI: Dark Motives (2004) — PC
  • CSI: Miami (2004) — PC
  • Cold Fear (2005) — PC, Xbox, PS2
  • Destoyer Command (2002) — PC
  • Dogz 5 (2002) — PC
  • F1 Racing Championship (2001) — PC, PS2, Dreamcast
  • Far Cry: Instincts (expected 2005) — Xbox
  • Far Cry (2004) — PC
  • Heritage of Kings: The Settlers (2005) — PC
  • IL-2 Sturmovik Forgotten Battles Ace Expansion Pack (2004) — PC
  • IL-2 Sturmovik (2001) — PC
  • Lock On: Modern Air Combat (2003) — PC
  • Monster 4x4: Masters of Metal (2003) — PS2, GC
  • Myst III: Exile (2001) — PC, Mac
  • Myst IV: Revelation (2004) — PC, Mac
  • Myst Masterpiece Edition (2000) — PC
  • Uru: The Path of the Shell (2004) — PC
  • Pacific Fighters (2004) — PC
  • P.O.D. (Planet of Death) (1996) — PC
  • Pool of Radiance (2001) — PC
  • Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2003) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC, GBA, (2005 DS)
  • Prince of Persia: Warrior Within (2004) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Rayman Arena (2002) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Rayman DS (2005) — DS
  • Rayman: Hoodlum's Revenge (2005) — GBA
  • Rayman M (2001) — PC, PS2
  • Rayman 2: The Great Escape (1999/2000) — PC, N64, DC, PSX
  • Rayman 3: Hoodlum Havoc (2003) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC, GBA, MAC, N-GAGE
  • realMYST (2000) — PC, Mac
  • Riven: The Sequel to Myst (1998) — PC
  • Rocket: Robot on Wheels (1999) — N64
  • Rocky Legends (2004) — Xbox, PS2
  • Secret of the Silver Earring (2004) — PC
  • Shadowbane: The Rise of Chaos (2003) — PC
  • Silent Hunter III (expected Q1 2005) — PC
  • Sprung (2004) — DS
  • Star Wars Trilogy: Apprentice of the Force (2004) — GBA
  • The Dukes of Hazzard: Return of the General Lee (2004) — Xbox, PS2
  • The Political Machine (2004) — PC
  • The Sum of All Fears (2002/2003) — GC, PC, GBA
  • Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon (2003) — Xbox, PS2, GC
  • Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Desert Siege (2003) — PC
  • Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Island Thunder (2003) — Xbox, PC
  • Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Jungle Storm (2004) — PS2
  • Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon 2 (2004/2005) — Xbox, PS2, GC
  • Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon 2 Summit Strike (2005) — Xbox
  • Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Rogue Spear (1999) — PC, Mac, DC, PSX
  • Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Rogue Spear: Black Thorn (2001) — PC
  • Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3: Raven Shield (2003) — PC
  • Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3: Athena Sword (2004) — PC
  • Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3: Iron Wrath (expected spring 2005) — PC
  • Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Lockdown (expected spring 2005) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell (2003) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory (2005) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow (2004) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Tork: Prehistoric Punk (2005) — Xbox
  • Uru: Ages Beyond Myst (2003) — PC
  • Warlords IV: Heroes of Etheria (2003) — PC
  • Will Rock (2003) — PC
  • XIII (2003) — Xbox, PS2, GC, PC
  • Yohoho! Puzzle Pirates (2005) — PC

External links

  • Sourced from Ubisoft on Wikipedia
  • Ubisoft's public site
  • Ubisoft's corporate site
  • Red Storm Entertainment, subsidiary developer of Ubi Soft
  • Wolfpack Studios, subsidiary developer of Ubi Soft

This article uses material from the "Ubisoft Entertainment" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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