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Ukrainian Premier League
Countries Ukraine
Confederation UEFA
Founded 1991/2008
Number of teams 16
Relegation to Ukrainian First League
Levels on pyramid 1
Domestic cup(s) Ukrainian Cup
International cup(s) Champions League
Europa League
Current champions Dynamo Kyiv (2008–09)
Most championships Dynamo Kyiv (13 titles)
Website http://www.fpl.ua/
EpiCentre Ukrainian Championship 2009–10

The Ukrainian Premier League (Ukrainian: "Прем'єр-Ліга", Premier-Liga) is the highest division of Ukrainian annual football championship. The league was founded in 1991 after the fold of the Soviet Union's Vysshaya Liga.

The Ukrainian Premier League has risen to be one of the better leagues in Europe and is now 7th in Europe by UEFA

Contents

Overview

2009-10 was the league's 2nd season after break away from the Professional Football League (PFL) in 2008 and 19th season from Soviet Vysshaya Liga fold. Until 2007 the league was subsidized by the government and from the economical point of view was not a profitable organization. To fix that issue the League tried to attract few sponsors since 2007 season: Soyuz-Viktan(2007) and Biolaa(2008). On April 15, 2008 the new Premier-League[1] was formed. The title sponsor of the League became the national network of the construction supermarkets EpiCentre. The new organization is a completely independent entity and consists of 16 football club organizations under the guidance of the Football Federation of Ukraine. [2]

The format of the League will stay the same. The changes that were made are exclusively administrative. The teams that reach the top of the competition table at the end of a season, will gain a chance to represent Ukraine internationally in several prestigious tournaments. Also at the end of the season, the bottom two clubs are relegated to the Persha Liha (organized by the Professional Football League) and replaced by the two top clubs from that league.

As of 2008, FC Shakhtar Donetsk is the reigning Ukrainian Premier League champion. SC Tavriya Simferopol won the first championship, and all subsequent titles have gone to either Dynamo or FC Shakhtar Donetsk except season 2008-2009 when FC Vorskla Poltava became the Cup winner. Only 5 teams, Dynamo, Shakhtar, FC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk, Tavria, and Metalurh Zaporizhia have participated in all 16 Ukrainian Vyscha Liha competitions.

The league cooperates with the Professional Football League of Ukraine which governs the lower divisions. The PFL is an association that represents 67 Ukrainian professional football clubs, which are represented by 78 teams (a few clubs have more than one team, which play in different divisions)[3]. The professional league was organized in 1996 and until 2008 was responsible for the competitions at the Top division as well. Before that, Vyscha Liha was governed solely and directly by the Football Federation of Ukraine.
^a). Note: Biola is a beverage making and bottling company and is the general sposor of Dnipro.

History

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The first decade (1992-2000)

The independent championship took place hastily at the start of the spring of 1992 after creation of the Ukrainian Vyscha Liha. The League was created out of the six teams that took part in the Soviet Top League, two teams from the Soviet First League, and nine out of eleven Ukrainian teams from the Soviet Second League. The other two of that eleven were placed in the Ukrainian Persha Liha as they were to be relegated anyway. The two best teams of the Soviet Second League B of the Ukrainian Zone were also placed in the Vyscha Liha along with the winner of the 1991 Ukrainian Cup that was placed ninth in the same group. The 20 participants were split in two groups with winners playing for the championship title and runners-up for the third place. Three teams from each group were to be relegated. As was expected, the five favorites, Dynamo Kyiv, Shakhtar Donetsk, Chornomorets Odessa, Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk, and Metalist Kharkiv were placed at the top of each group. In the championship play-off game in Lviv, a sensation took place as Tavriya Simferopol beat Dynamo Kyiv 1-0. The Crimeans earned the first Ukrainian title (thus far their only), losing only once to FC Temp Shepetivka.

After being stunned in the first championship by the tragedy in Lviv, Dynamo Kyiv were anxious to earn their first title at the second opportunity. In the second championship that had a regular League format of 16 teams, the main rivals of the Kyivians were Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk, who were top after the first half of the season. By the end of the season both teams were going shoulder to shoulder and at the end they finished with the same number of points. The championship title was awarded to Dynamo Kyiv as they had better goal difference. Neither the Golden match, nor the fact that Dnipro had a better head-to-head record was considered.

The next seven years were known by the total hegemony of Dynamo Kyiv. During this period the Soviet stereotypes had changed as some of the best teams were going into a crisis. After the 1993-94 season Metalist Kharkiv were surprisingly relegated to the Persha Liha. In the 1995-96 season Shakhtar Donetsk had the worst year in the club's history, coming tenth. Chornomorets Odessa were relegated twice during that first decade after which manager Leonid Buriak was sacked. A few newly-created teams have since emerged such as Arsenal Kyiv and Metalurh Donetsk, as well as FC Vorskla Poltava, who surprisingly came third in the club's first season at the Top Level in the 1997.

The decade of Kyiv–Donetsk stand-off (2001–2010). The Ukrainian derby

The next decade was marked by fierce competition between Dynamo Kyiv and Shakhtar Donetsk. Since 2000, Donetsk club proved to be the real challengers to Kiev's dominance. In 2000 Shakhtar earned their first qualification to the Champions League earning its place in the Group stage. Nonetheless, Dynamo is still considered to be the benchmark of excellence in the country and the primary feeder to the Ukrainian national football team. 2002 became the real cornerstone in the miners history when they earned their first national title under the management of the newly appointed Italian specialist, Nevio Scala, who managed to bring the Donetsk club to its next Ukrainian Cup title as well. Since that time the issue of foreign players became particularly acute and brought a series of court cases (see Players section). The FFU and PFL worked together to solve that issue, coming with the plan to force the transitional limitation of the foreign players over the time.

The clubs such as Dnipro and Chornomorets recent contenders for the title had to put up a fierce competition against the newly established contenders Metalurh from Donetsk and Metalist from Kharkiv to qualify for the European competitions. Especially brightly recommended itself FC Metalist Kharkiv which in the late 2000s consistently was placing right behind Dynamo and Shakhtar. The remarkable was their participation in their 2009 European season when they had to contest against Dynamo Kyiv to earn their advancement to the quarter-finals of the UEFA Cup 2009. Later that UEFA Cup edition was won for the first time by the Shakhtar Donetsk, the first club of the independent Ukraine.

On the political side of the League it split since the moment it was created in 2008 regards of its president. The dispute went as far as even canceling the XIII round of 2009-2010 season and moving it to the spring half, while having the XIV round still playing in the fall. The representatives of five clubs: Arsenal, Dynamo, Dnipro, Kryvbas, and Metalist have been boycotting most of the League meetings, not complying with its financial obligations and giving the broadcasting rights to TV-channel other than League official contractor. They justified their actions because of what they see to be as the illegal elections of the League's president. The representatives of the above mentioned clubs did not recognize elected in 2008 Vitaliy Danilov as the president and believed that the elections should have been won by Vadym Rabynovych. To resolve this conflict Vitaliy Danilov initiated in September 2009 re-election of the League's presindent and on the 1st December 2009 won the election again with 11 clubs voted for his candidature, 3 - against, 1 abstain, and 1 (Dnipro) - absent. This time most presidents of the Premier League of Ukraine acknowledged Vitaliy Danilov legality.

International Relations

In 2009 Ukrainian Premier League joined European Professional Football Leagues (EPFL).

Also in 2009 league signed partnership with IMG who during the first month of cooperation sold broadcasting rights for Ukrainian Cup to Poland and Armenia.

By itself Ukrainian Premier League sold broadcasting rights to Romania and Russia.

Calendar

Clubs play each other twice (once at home and once away) to make up the 30-match season. The league begins in mid-July and ends in mid-June. After 15 rounds of fixtures, there is a winter break that lasts for three months (from early December to early March). Thus, the winter break is significantly longer than the interval between seasons. Such organization accounts for climatic conditions and matches that of most European leagues in terms of the beginning and the end of the season.

The first season of the League in 1992 was exceptional as it lasted for only half a year. This was because the last Soviet league season ended in autumn of 1991, and the Football Federation of Ukraine decided to shift the calendar from “spring-fall” to “fall-spring” football seasons. In the premiere season, 20 clubs were divided into two 10-team groups. In both groups, each club played each other twice, and the championship was decided by a play-off match between the group winners, in which Tavriya surprised the pre-season favorite Dynamo.

After the first season, in each of the following seasons each team played each other team in the League twice. The number of participating teams fluctuated between 14 and 18, stabilizing for the last five seasons at 16.

As of the 2005-06 season, the golden match rule was introduced. According to the rule, if the first two teams obtain the same number of points, the championship is to be decided by an additional "golden" match between the two teams. In fact, in that season Dynamo and Shakhtar had earned the same number of points and Shakhtar won the championship by winning the golden match (2:1 after extra time).

Players

Prior to 2000, only a handful foreign players represented Ukrainian clubs, and even those players were mostly from countries that were once a part of the Soviet Union. However, in 2000-01, the number of foreign players participating in the Vyscha Liha had tallied more than 30 players and by 2003-04 season, the figure had increased to 37% of the league's players.[4] Only 2 players from Ukraine's domestic leagues competed in the 2002 FIFA World Cup in Korea and Japan, while at the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany, the Vyscha Liha was the 6th-most represented league with 25 players in the competition, including 17 of the 23 players in Ukraine's squad.

As a result of this increase in foreign-born players, clubs in the Vyscha Liha are allowed to field no more than seven foreigners at one time from this season and this limit is expected to be lowered to six foreigners. In addition, clubs are subject to a $15,000 fine upon acquiring a foreign player. One of the biggest proponents of the foreigner limit was the ex-national team coach Oleg Blokhin (2003-2007), who threatened to quit the national team if the limit was not made stricter.[5]

The clubs mainly affected by this rule include the few clubs that participate annually in European competitions. They argue that the foreigner limit is detrimental to the development of Ukrainian football in general. However, as a result of this limit, these clubs have had to increase their efforts finding and training Ukrainian talent that is good enough to represent these teams.

The foreigner limit itself has also been recently contested by several cases, but primarily by one filed by a Georgian national Georgi Demetradze, who argued that the limit impeded on his working rights and is illegal under the Ukrainian constitution. The courts however argued that no case exists, such that players are not guaranteed first-team football, and subsequently the limit is not considered a violation of trade.[6]

Presidents

Directors

  • General director: Olexandr Efremov
  • Executive director: Maksym Bondarev
  • Sport director: Serhiy Mokhnyk
  • Development director: Vadym Halahan

Sponsors

The following list is of the official sponsors of the League, unless otherwise noted.

Previous

  • Ukraine Chernihivske 2008 - 2009
  • Ukraine Morskie (TV sposor) 2008 - 2009

Current

  • England Umbro (technical partner) 2008 - present
  • Russia Sport-Express (in Ukraine) (media partner) 2008 - present
  • Ukraine Dalnie ostrova 2009 - present
  • Ukraine Futbol (official TV sponsor) 2009 - 2011[8]
  • Ukraine Obolon 2009 - present
  • Ukraine Inter + (TV partner) 2008 - present (for international broadcasting)
  • Ukraine football.ua (Internet sponsor) 2009 - present (part of the Ukrainian media holding)

Ukrainian Premier League 2009–10

Map shows the locations of Ukrainian Premier League 2009–10 teams.

In the 2009–10 season, the Ukrainian Premier League consisted of the following teams:

FC Kharkiv and FC Lviv, the two least successful teams in the league in 2008-09, were relegated to the Ukrainian First League. Zakarpattia Uzhhorod and Obolon Kyiv were promoted to take their place.

Broadcasting

Free-to-air live matches from the Ukrainian Premier League will be broadcast on Saturdays and Sundays on satellite channel Inter+ (Sirius 5E).[9]

UEFA Ranking

Club Seeding

UEFA Club Ranking for club seeding in 2009–10 European football season.

Current
Ranking
Movement Last Season
Ranking
Teams Coefficient
16 (16) Shakhtar Donetsk 73.910
44 Substituted off (41) Dynamo Kyiv 42.910
79 Substituted on (87) Metalist Kharkiv 25.410
114 Substituted off (87) Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 14.910
142 Substituted on (147) Metalurh Donetsk 11.410
159 Substituted on (New) Vorskla Poltava 9.410
162 Substituted off (152) Metalurh Zaporizhzhya 8.910

Note: Since 1999 country index (coefficient) indicates the lowest possible value for any team of that country to qualify for ranking. Currently it's no less than 7.910 for Ukraine. Teams in italics have either been eliminated or will not be participating in the 2009–10 European football season. Last Updated: March 9, 2010.[10]

Country Ranking

UEFA Country Ranking for league participation in 2009-10 European football season

Current
Ranking
Movement Last Season
Ranking
League Coefficient
4 (4) Germany German League 61.874
5 (5) France French League 52.906
6 (6) Russia Russian League 43.791
7 (7) Ukraine Ukrainian League 39.550
8 Substituted on (9) Romania Romanian League 39.491
9 Substituted on (10) Portugal Portuguese League 37.962
10 Substituted off (8) Netherlands Dutch League 36.546

Last Updated: March 9, 2010.[11] In bold are the leagues which clubs are still in competitions.

Champions and top goalscorers

Season Champion Runner-Up 3rd Position Top Goalscorer Rank
2009-10
2008-09 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Metalist Kharkiv Ukraine Oleksandr Kovpak (Tavriya Simferopol 17 goals) 7/53
2007-08 Shakhtar Donetsk Dynamo Kyiv Metalist Kharkiv Serbia Marko Dević (Metalist Kharkiv 19 goals) 12/53
2006-07 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Metalist Kharkiv Ukraine Oleksandr Hladky (FC Kharkiv 13 goals) 11/52
2005-06 Shakhtar Donetsk Dynamo Kyiv Chornomorets Odessa Brazil Brandão (Shakhtar Donetsk, 15 goals)
Nigeria Emmanuel Okoduwa (Arsenal Kyiv, 15 goals)
13/52
2004-05 Shakhtar Donetsk Dynamo Kyiv Metalurh Donetsk Ukraine Oleksandr Kosyrin (Chornomorets Odessa, 14 goals) 15/52
2003-04 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Georgia (country) Georgi Demetradze (Metalurh Donetsk, 18 goals) 14/52
2002-03 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Metalurh Donetsk Uzbekistan Maksim Shatskikh (Dynamo Kyiv, 22 goals) 14/52
2001-02 Shakhtar Donetsk Dynamo Kyiv Metalurh Donetsk Ukraine Serhiy Shyschenko (Metalurh Donetsk, 12 goals) 13/51
2000-01 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Ukraine Andriy Vorobei (Shakhtar Donetsk, 21 goals) 13/51
1999-00 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih Uzbekistan Maksim Shatskikh (Dynamo Kyiv, 20 goals) 12/50
1998-99 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko (Dynamo Kyiv, 18 goals) 15/50
1997-98 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Karpaty Lviv Ukraine Serhiy Rebrov (Dynamo Kyiv, 22 goals) 17/49
1996-97 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Vorskla Poltava Ukraine Oleh Matveyev (Shakhtar Donetsk, 21 goals) 22/48
1995-96 Dynamo Kyiv Chornomorets Odessa Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Ukraine Timerlan Huseinov (Chornomorets Odessa, 20 goals) 19/48
1994-95 Dynamo Kyiv Chornomorets Odessa Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Tajikistan Arsen Avakov (Torpedo Zaporizhzhya, 21 goals) 24/47
1993-94 Dynamo Kyiv Shakhtar Donetsk Chornomorets Odessa Ukraine Timerlan Huseinov (Chornomorets Odessa, 18 goals) 24/44
1992-93 Dynamo Kyiv Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Chornomorets Odessa Ukraine Serhiy Husyev (Chornomorets Odessa, 17 goals) 28/39
1992 Tavriya Simferopol Dynamo Kyiv Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Ukraine Yuri Hudymenko (Tavriya Simferopol, 12 goals) N/A[12]

Note: the Rank column shows the ranking of the league amongst members of UEFA.
Note: in bold are the winners that also won the Ukrainian Cup, in italic are the other champions of the Cup competition.

Performance by club

Club Ukraine football association.gifWinners Runners-Up 3rd Position Seasons Won
Dynamo Kyiv 13 5 0 1992-93, 1993-94, 1994-95, 1995-96, 1996-97, 1997-98, 1998-99, 1999-00, 2000-01, 2002-03, 2003-04, 2006-07, 2008-09
Shakhtar Donetsk 4 10 0 2001-02, 2004-05, 2005-06, 2007-08
Tavriya Simferopol 1 0 0 1992
Chornomorets Odessa 0 2 3
Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 0 1 5
Metalist Kharkiv 0 0 3
Metalurh Donetsk 0 0 3
Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih 0 0 2
Vorskla Poltava 0 0 1
Karpaty Lviv 0 0 1

Honored Teams

In European Football teams are especially honored for winning multiple league titles, after 10 league titles a representative star is placed above the teams badge to indicate 10 league titles. Dynamo Kyiv became the first Ukrainian team to achieve this prestigious honor of winning the Soviet league for the 10th time in 1981. Dynamo Kyiv once entered the Ukrainian championship has established to become the same leader as during the Soviet times earning its 20th national title at the top level in 1999. No other club in Ukraine came close to such honor as of yet. Only four other clubs has ever been the national champions: Shakhtar Donetsk (4), Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk (2), and once Zorya Luhansk and Tavriya Simferopol.

The current (as of December 2008) officially-sanctioned the Premier League stars are:

Top scorers

All-time Vyscha Liha scorers
Player Games Goals
1 Serhiy Rebrov 261 123
2 Maksim Shatskikh 214 97
3 Oleksandr Haidash 259 95
4 Andriy Vorobei [13] 265 92
5 Serhiy Mizin 344 90
6 Timerlan Huseinov 215 85
7 Oleksandr Kosyrin [13] 224 84
8 Oleh Matveyev 213 81
9 Oleksandr Palyanytsia 260 79
9 Valentyn Poltavets 322 77
Data through 2008-09 season[14].
Active Vyscha Liha scorers
Player Games Goals
1 Andriy Vorobei 265 92
2 Oleksandr Kosyrin 224 84
3 Serhiy Zakarlyuka 320 70
4 Andriy Shevchenko 117 60
5 Oleksiy Byelik 162 55
6 Vasil Gigiadze 184 54
= Vasyl Sachko 198 54
8 Serhiy Shyschenko 353 53
9 Oleksandr Rykun 270 47
10 Oleksandr Melashchenko 220 46
Data through 2008-09 season.[14]
All-time Vyscha Liha foreign scorers
Country/Player Games Goals
1 Uzbekistan Maksim Shatskikh 214 97
2 Brazil Brandão 65
3 Georgia (country) Vasil Gigiadze [13] 184 57
3 Georgia (country) Avtandil Kapanadze 57
5 Georgia (country) Georgi Demetradze 52
6 Belarus Valiatsin Bialkevich 51
7 Brazil Diogo Rinkon 46
8 Russia Andrey Fedkov 39
9 Nigeria Emmanuel Okoduwa 37
10 Georgia (country) Tariel Kapanadze 36
Data through the first half of the 2009-10 season[14].

Ex-Shakhtar Donetsk and Dynamo Kyiv striker Serhiy Rebrov holds the record for most UPL goals with 123, despite winning the top single season scorer title only once.

Since the first UPL season in 1992, 17 different players have won or shared the top scorer's title. No player has won the title in consecutive seasons and only two players have won the title more than once, Timerlan Huseinov and Maksim Shatskikh. Serhiy Rebrov and Maksim Shatskikh hold the record for most goals in a season (22) and are the only two players to score at least 20 goals twice. The most prolific single season scorers are Ivan Hetsko and Andriy Shevchenko, respectively attaining 0.59 and 0.51 goals per game.

Dynamo Kyiv and Shakhtar Donetsk are the only teams to have scored 1,000 goals in the UPL having achieved the feat in the 2006–07 season and 2007-08 season, respectively.

Notable foreign players

In italic are the players that were born in Ukraine, but chose to represent other countries.

Top 10 managers

Managers in bold are active. - Managers that have past away. Updated through 2008/2009 season.

Rating Name Club(s) Points 1st 2nd 3rd
1 Ukraine Valery Lobanovsky FC Dynamo Kyiv 27 5 1 -
2 Romania Mircea Lucescu FC Shakhtar Donetsk 19 3 2 -
3 Ukraine Yozhef Sabo FC Dynamo Kyiv 12 2 1 -
4 Ukraine Oleksiy Mykhailychenko FC Dynamo Kyiv 10 2 - -
5 Ukraine Mykola Pavlov FC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
FC Dynamo Kyiv
8 1 1 1
= Ukraine Valery Yaremchenko FC Shakhtar Donetsk 8 - 4 -
7 Ukraine Anatoliy Demyanenko FC Dynamo Kyiv 7 1 1 -
= Russia Yuri Semin FC Dynamo Kyiv 7 1 1 -
9 Ukraine Viktor Prokopenko FC Chornomorets Odessa
FC Shakhtar Donetsk
6 - 2 2
10 Ukraine Mykhailo Fomenko FC Dynamo Kyiv 5 1 - -
= Ukraine Anatoliy Zayaev SC Tavriya Simferopol 5 1 - -
= Italy Nevio Scala FC Shakhtar Donetsk 5 1 - -

This rating is of the best managers in the League since its foundation in 1991. It is based on the following factors:
1st place - 5 points,
2nd place - 2 points,
3rd place - 1 point.
There are over 20 managers who brought their teams to the top of the League over its history.[16] Other notable coaches are Leonid Buriak (Chornomorets) - two silver medals and Myron Markevych (Karpaty \1\, Metalist \3\) - four bronze medals.
‹The template Fnb is being considered for deletion.›  Note 1: Mykhailychenko became the club manager at the end of the season for only five (5) games. Therefore the silver really belongs to Lobanovsky who lead the first team in 21 games of the 2001-02 season.
‹The template Fnb is being considered for deletion.›  Note 2: Lucescu became the club manager at the end of the season for only five (5) games. Therefore the silver really belongs to Schuster who lead the first team in 23 games in the 2003-04 season.


All-time participants

The table lists the place each team took in each of the seasons. All figures are correct through the 2008-09 season. For the all-time table click here. Teams marked pink are no longer members of PFL, in green are member of the Premier League.

1992 92/93 93/94 94/95 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10
Teams 20 16 18 18 18 16 16 16 16 14 14 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16
Arsenal Kyiv [17]         4 11 10 7 10 6 12 5 9 9 12 14 6 11 V
Borysfen Boryspil                         7 16          
Bukovyna Chernivtsi 10 12 17                                
Chornomorets Odessa 5 3 3 2 2 7 15   15     8 5 6 3 6 7 10 V
Dynamo Kyiv 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 V
Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 3 2 4 3 3 4 4 12 11 3 6 4 3 4 6 4 4 6 V
Illychivets Mariupol             14 5 8 4 10 10 8 5 4 15   14 V
Karpaty Lviv 13 6 5 8 8 5 3 4 9 10 8 7 15     8 10 9 V
FC Kharkiv                             13 12 14 16  
Kremin Kremenchuk 14 9 15 10 9 15                        
Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih   8 6 6 14 12 8 3 3 11 9 12 10 13 14 10 13 12 V
FC Lviv                                   15  
Metalist Kharkiv 6 5 18         6 5 9 5 16   11 5 3 3 3 V
Metalurh Donetsk             7 14 7 5 3 3 4 3 9 9 12 4 V
Metalurh Zaporizhzhya 11 7 16 9 5 8 9 8 6 8 4 15 11 10 8 7 9 7 V
Naftovyk-Ukrnafta Okhtyrka 16                               15    
Nyva Ternopil 7 14 7 12 13 9 6 13 12 14                  
Nyva Vinnytsia 15   10 14 15 16                          
Obolon Kyiv                       14 6 15         V
Oleksandria                     13 13              
Prykarpattya Ivano-Frankivsk 17     11 11 13 13 15 14                    
SC Mykolaiv 18     13 16     16                      
SCA Odessa 20                                    
Shakhtar Donetsk 4 4 2 4 10 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 V
Stal Alchevsk                   13         11 16      
Tavriya Simferopol 1 10 8 5 12 6 12 9 13 7 7 9 12 7 7 5 5 8 V
Temp Shepetivka 19   9 17                              
Torpedo Zaporizhzhya 8 13 13 7 7 14 16                        
Veres Rivne   16 11 18                              
Volyn Lutsk 9 11 12 15 17             6 13 8 15        
Vorskla Poltava           3 5 10 4 12 11 11 14 14 10 13 8 5 V
Zakarpattia Uzhhorod                     14     12 16   16   V
Zirka Kirovohrad         6 10 11 11 16       16            
Zorya Luhansk 12 15 14 16 18                     11 11 13 V

Stadia

Rank Stadium Capacity [18] Club Notes
1 NSC Olimpiysky 83,450 None at the moment Currently undergoing renovations in preparation for Euro 2012.
Dynamo Kyiv plays its major European matches on this ground, and usually it is the annual venue for the Ukrainian Cup final
2 Donbas Arena 51,504 Shakhtar Donetsk
3 Metalist Stadium 41,411 Metalist Kharkiv
4 Tsentralnyi-Chornomorets Stadium 34,362 Chornomorets Odessa Currently undergoing renovations in preparation for Euro 2012
5 Shakhtar Stadium 31,718 Metalurh Donetsk Loaned to Metalurh by Shakhtar for the European competitions.
6 Dnipro Stadium 31,003 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Moved from the old arena. Inauguration's on September 14, 2008.
7 Metalurh Stadium 29,734 Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih
8 Ukraina Stadium 28,051 Karpaty Lviv
FC Lviv[19]
Plans to upgrade to ~40,000 seats in prep for Euro 2012
9 RSK Olimpiyskiy 26,100 Shakhtar Donetsk Moving to new UEFA 5-star 50,000-seat venue in 2009
10 Yuvileiny Stadium (Sumy) 25,830 Kharkiv FC Kharkiv are currently leasing this stadium
11 Vorskla Stadium 24,795 Vorskla Poltava
12 Stadium Meteor 24,381 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Moving to new 31,003-seat arena. Inauguration's on September 14, 2008.
13 Avanhard Stadium 22,288 Zorya Luhansk
14 Lokomotiv Stadium 19,978 Tavriya Simferopol
15 Lobanovsky Dynamo Stadium 16,873 Dynamo Kyiv
Arsenal Kyiv
Arsenal Kyiv is temporarily playing at this stadium
16 Illychivets Stadium 12,460 Illychivets Mariupol
17 Slavutych Arena 11,756 Metalurh Zaporizhia
18 Metalurh Stadium 5,094 Metalurh Donetsk
19 Obolon Stadium 4,300 Arsenal Kyiv Loaned to Arsenal Kyiv by Obolon
20 Knyazha Arena 3,500 FC Lviv FC Lviv's home ground in Dobromyl
21 Bannikov Stadium 1,678 Arsenal Kyiv Arsenal Kyiv is temporarily playing at this stadium

League attendance

All attendance figures are correct through 08/09 season.[20]

Season Att Per Match Total Att Highest Att By Team (Att By Team) Highest Home Att By Team (Att By Team)
1992 5,650 1,028,270 Dynamo Kyiv (8,630) Nyva Ternopil (11,133)
1992-93 5,835 1,400,480 Dynamo Kyiv (7,682) Nyva Ternopil (10,725)
1993-94 5,887 1,801,520 Dynamo Kyiv (8,674) Veres Rivne (11,059)
1994-95 5,557 1,694,980 Dynamo Kyiv (8,009) SC Mykolaiv (9,600)
1995-96 5,878 1,787,050 Dynamo Kyiv (8,924) Zirka Kirovohrad (12,324)
1996-97 6,332 791,550 Vorskla Poltava (9,703) Vorskla Poltava (12,300)
1997-98 5,879 1,405,050 Karpaty Lviv (9,937) Karpaty Lviv (13,767)
1998-99 7,588 1,821,100 Dynamo Kyiv (12,040) Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih (15,960)
1999-00 8,112 1,947,000 Shakhtar Donetsk (13,333) Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih (16,233)
2000-01 9,302 1,692,950 Shakhtar Donetsk (20,190) Shakhtar Donetsk (24,462)
2001-02 9,712 1,767,607 Shakhtar Donetsk (18,688) Shakhtar Donetsk (25,615)
2002-03 7,415 1,779,525 Shakhtar Donetsk (16,332) Shakhtar Donetsk (20,833)
2003-04 7,725 1,854,060 Shakhtar Donetsk (14,922) Shakhtar Donetsk (17,931)
2004-05 7,302 1,737,777 Shakhtar Donetsk (16,555) Shakhtar Donetsk (19,956)
2005-06 7,919 1,908,424 Shakhtar Donetsk (15,875) Shakhtar Donetsk (19,358)
2006-07 9,052 2,163,490 Shakhtar Donetsk (16,966) Shakhtar Donetsk (19,193)
2007-08 8,546 2,042,390 Shakhtar Donetsk (17,372) Shakhtar Donetsk (20,080)
2008-09 7,574 1,817,760 Shakhtar Donetsk (15,387) Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk (27,000)

See also

References & footnotes

  1. ^ Official website of the Ukrainian Premier League
  2. ^ Formation of Ukrainian Premier League - Ratified 27 May 2008 (Ukrainian)
  3. ^ "Professional Football League of Ukraine". PFL. http://pfl.com.ua/pfl.php. Retrieved May 31, 2007. 
  4. ^ "Foreigners: limit or blasphemy?". Komanda Newspaper. http://www.dynamo.kiev.ua/Press/Kom0304/kom0320.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  5. ^ "Foreigner limit is worsened in Ukraine". Terrikon. http://www.terrikon.dn.ua/posts/4432. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  6. ^ "Courts back Ukrainian quotas". UEFA. http://www.uefa.com/footballeurope/news/kind=2/newsid=520447.html. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  7. ^ Danilov re-elected as president of Ukrainian football premier league, Kyiv Post (December 2, 2009)
  8. ^ Premier League presents its TV sponsor for 2009-2011
  9. ^ 'Inter+' Starts Live Airing of Ukrainian Premiere League Matches, Inter+ (June 26, 2009)
  10. ^ "UEFA Team Ranking 2010". Bert Kassies. http://www.xs4all.nl/~kassiesa/bert/uefa/data/method4/2010.html. 
  11. ^ "UEFA Country Ranking 2010". Bert Kassies. http://www.xs4all.nl/~kassiesa/bert/uefa/data/method4/crank2010.html. 
  12. ^ part of Soviet Union
  13. ^ a b c Currently active on a Premier League team's roster
  14. ^ a b c *(Russian) Ukrainian Football Database Spreadsheet - Copy link location directly to your URL bar to access Players records
  15. ^ Marko accepted the Ukrainian citizenship in 2008. In this roster he is listed as the Ukrainian.
  16. ^ Rating of coaches is based on the article from Komanda - May 20, 2008
  17. ^ FC Arsenal Kyiv was renamed from CSCA Kyiv in 2001, the original FC CSCA Kyiv was recreated in the Ukrainian First Division in place of CSCA-2 Kyiv.
  18. ^ "Attendance figures for the 17th season of Ukrainian Premier League". UA Football. http://www.ua-football.com/ukrainian/high/46b0c2e0.html. Retrieved August 3, 2007. 
  19. ^ "FC Lviv relocates to Ukraina". FC Karpaty. http://www.ua-football.com/ukrainian/high/487498a3.html. Retrieved July 9, 2008. 
  20. ^ "Ukrainian Soccer Net". UkrainianSoccer.Com. http://www.ukrainiansoccer.com. Retrieved July 4, 2008. 

External links


Simple English

Ukrainian Premier League
Country Ukraine
Confederation UEFA
Founded 1992
Level 1
Number of teams 16
Relegation to Ukrainian First League
Domestic cup Ukrainian Cup
Current champions Shakhtar (2008/09)
Most successful club Dynamo Kyiv (13)
Website http://www.fpl.ua/
Ukrainian Premier League 2009–10

Ukrainian Premier League is a football league which is top division in Ukraine.

Club 2010/11

  • Arsenal Kyiv
  • Volyn Lutsk
  • Vorskla Poltava
  • Dynamo Kyiv
  • Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
  • Zorya Luhansk
  • Illichivets Mariupol
  • Karpaty Lviv
  • Kryvbas Kryvyi Rih
  • Sevastopol
  • Metalist Kharkiv
  • Metalurh Donetsk
  • Metalurh Zaporizhya
  • Obolon Kyiv
  • Tavriya Simferopol
  • Shakhtar Donetsk

References

Template:Ukrainian Premier League seasons

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