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United States Army Chaplain Corps: Wikis

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The Chaplain Corps of the United States Army consists of ordained clergy who are commissioned Army officers as well as enlisted soldiers who serve as assistants. Their purpose is to offer religious services, counseling, and moral support to the armed forces, whether in peacetime or at war.

Contents

Army Chaplain Center and School

See footnotes[1][2]

The U.S. Army Chaplain Center and School (USACHCS)[3] is part of the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Center (AFCC), which also includes the Air Force Chaplain Service Institute (AFCSI) and the U.S. Naval Chaplaincy School and Center (NCSC). The three schools are co-located at Fort Jackson, in Columbia, S.C.[4]

In 2005, the Base Realignment and Closure Commission decided to put all military ministry training at the same location.[4]

The purpose of the AFCC is to have closer cooperation among the three chaplain corps and to share instruction and training.[4]

The U.S. Army Chaplain School was approved on February 9, 1918. Its first session began on March 3, 1918, at Fort Monroe, Virginia.[5] Chaplain (MAJ) Aldred A. Pruden, who developed the plan for the school, was named the first commandant of the school.[5] It subsequently moved to Camp Zachary Taylor (Kentucky), Camp Grant (Illinois), Fort Leavenworth (Kansas), Fort Benjamin Harrison (Indiana), Harvard University (Massachusetts), Fort Devens (Mass.), Fort Oglethorpe (Georgia), Carlisle Barracks (Pennsylvania), Fort Slocum (New York) (1951-62), Fort Hamilton (N.Y.) (1962-974), Fort Wadsworth (N.Y.) (1974-79), and Fort Monmouth (New Jersey) (1979-95).[5]

Noncombatant status

A Roman Catholic army chaplain celebrating a Mass for Union soldiers and officers during the American Civil War (1861-1865).
See: Military chaplain#Noncombatant status

Chaplain assistants

Specialty insignia

See: Military chaplain#Badges and insignia
See: Military chaplain#U.S. Armed Forces uniforms, badges, and insignia
See also: Air Force Religious Pin and List of United States Navy staff corps (Chaplain Corps insignia: Christian, Jewish, Muslim)
For FAQ's regarding uniforms and insignia, see footnote.[6]

Chiefs of Army Chaplains

  • Major General Douglas L. Carver - current Chief of Chaplains, United States Army
  • Brigadier General Mathew A. Zimmerman (years in office unknown) – the first African-American Chief of the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps
  • Major General Patrick J. Ryan – dedicated the U.S. Army Chaplain Museum on February 10, 1958[7]

Army bases chaplaincy

See footnotes[8][9]
For a link to the chaplaincy at each of the bases listed below, see footnote[10]

U.S. Military Academy chaplaincy

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Chapels

For all six USMA chapels, see footnote[11]

Chaplains

See footnote[12]

Cadet Prayer

See footnote[13]

Museum

For historic photographs of Army chaplains in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, see footnote.[14]

The U.S. Army Chaplain Museum is located at Fort Jackson, South Carolina.[15] It was established on August 14, 1957, at the then–United States Army Chaplain School at Fort Slocum, New York. It was dedicated on February 10, 1958, by Chaplain (MG) Patrick J. Ryan, Chief of Chaplains.[7]

"The Four Chaplains"

When the troop-transport ship USAT Dorchester was torpedoed during World War II, four Army chaplains ministered to the soldiers and sailors on the sinking ship, gave up their life jackets, and sacrificed their lives when the ship sank.[16] Those chaplains — known as "The Four Chaplains" — were Lt. George L. Fox, Methodist; Lt. Alexander D. Goode, Jewish; Lt. John P. Washington, Roman Catholic; and Lt. Clark V. Poling, Dutch Reformed.

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ Army Chaplain Corps: Chaplain Basic Officer Leadership Course. GoArmy.com. Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  2. ^ Training Directorate. (United States Army Chaplaincy official homepage). Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  3. ^ US Army Chaplain Center & School (United States Army Chaplaincy official homepage). Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  4. ^ a b c "First Group of Navy Chaplains Graduate from NSCS Fort Jackson". Navy.mil (USN official website), 11/10/2009. By Steve Vanderwerff, Naval Education and Training Command Public Affairs. Retrieved 2009-12-03.
  5. ^ a b c Chaplaincy History & Museum: History of Chaplain Corps. US Army Chaplain Corps (United States Army Chaplaincy official homepage). Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  6. ^ Chaplaincy History & Museum: FAQ's (United States Army Chaplaincy official homepage). Retrieved 2010-03-05.
  7. ^ a b Chaplaincy History & Museum: History (United States Army Chaplaincy official homepage). Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  8. ^ Wise, Jeremy (Army Flier Staff) (February 18, 2010). "Fort Rucker officials break ground on new post chapel". Army.mil. http://www.army.mil/-news/2010/02/18/34668-fort-rucker-officials-break-ground-on-new-post-chapel/. Retrieved 2010-03-05. 
  9. ^ Schuette, Rob (Fort McCoy Public Affairs) (January 12, 2010). "Fort McCoy chapels get major makeovers". Army.mil. http://www.army.mil/-news/2010/01/12/32812-fort-mccoy-chapels-get-major-makeovers/. Retrieved 2010-03-05. 
  10. ^ Go to Office of the USMA Chaplain and click on "Links" in left-hand column. USMA website. Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  11. ^ Go to Office of the USMA Chaplain and click on "Chapels" in left-hand column. USMA official website. Retrieved 2009-12-23.
  12. ^ Go to Office of the USMA Chaplain and click on "Chaplains" in left-hand column. USMA official website. Retrieved 2009-12-23.
  13. ^ Go to Office of the USMA Chaplain and click on "Cadet Prayer" in left-hand column. USMA official website. Retrieved 2009-12-23.
  14. ^ Chaplaincy History & Museum: Historic Photos (World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War). US Army Chaplain Corps (United States Army Chaplaincy official homepage). Retrieved 2010-03-05.
  15. ^ Chaplaincy Museum (United States Army Chaplaincy official homepage). Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  16. ^ The Four Chaplains Memorial Foundation. Retrieved 2009-12-01.

Further reading

See: Military chaplain#Further reading

External links


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