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United States District Court for the District of South Carolina
(D.S.C.)
Map
South Carolina Locator Map.PNG
Appeals to Fourth Circuit
Established October 7, 1965
Judges assigned 10
Chief judge David C. Norton
Official site

The United States District Court for the District of South Carolina (in case citations, D.S.C.) is the federal district court whose jurisdiction is the state of South Carolina. Court is held in the cities of Aiken, Anderson, Beaufort, Charleston, Columbia, Florence, Greenville, and Spartanburg.

Appeals from the District of South Carolina are taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit).

Contents

History

The District of South Carolina was one of the original 13 courts established by the Judiciary Act of 1789, 1 Stat. 73, on September 24, 1789.[1] It was subdivided into the United States District Court for the Eastern District of South Carolina and the United States District Court for the Western District of South Carolina Districts on February 21, 1823 by 3 Stat. 726.[1] The Eastern District was headquartered at Florence,[2] and the Western District was headquartered in Greenville.[3] The division was solely for the purposes of holding court - a single judge presided over both districts, and the act authorized no additional court staff.[1]

In 1898 the United States Supreme Court held in Barrett v. United States[4] that South Carolina legally constituted a single judicial district. Congress made another effort to subdivide the District on March 3, 1911, by 36 Stat. 1087, 1123. South Carolina was again split into Eastern and the Western Districts, with one judgeship authorized to serve both districts, effective January 1, 1912.[1] Congress finally authorized an additional judgeship for the Western District, and assigned the sitting judge exclusively to the Eastern District, on March 3, 1915, by 38 Stat. 961.[1] However, on October 7, 1965, by 79 Stat. 951, South Carolina was reorganized as a single judicial district with four judgeships authorized for the district court.[1] It has since remained a single District.

The United States Attorney for the District of South Carolina represents the United States in civil and criminal litigation in the court. The current United States Attorney is Walt Wilkins.

Current judges

  • As of June 1, 2009, a second vacancy exists in the District due to the decision of Judge Henry Michael Herlong, Jr. to assume senior status. On December 22, 2009, Barack Obama nominated Richard Mark Gergel, a Columbia lawyer in private practice, to fill the vacancy. He requires confirmation by the U.S. Senate, which has yet to act on his nomination.
  • As of December 27, 2009, a third vacancy exists in the District due to the decision of Judge Patrick Michael Duffy to assume senior status. No replacement nomination is pending at this time.
# Title Judge Duty station Born Term of service Appointed by
Active Chief Senior
26 Chief Judge David C. Norton Charleston 1946 1990–present 2007–present G.H.W. Bush
25 District Judge Joseph Fletcher Anderson, Jr. Columbia 1949 1986–present 2000–2007 Reagan
30 District Judge Cameron McGowan Currie Columbia 1948 1994–present Clinton
32 District Judge Margaret B. Seymour Columbia 1947 1998–present Clinton
33 District Judge Terry L. Wooten Florence 1954 2001–present G.W. Bush
34 District Judge Henry Franklin Floyd Spartanburg 1947 2003–present G.W. Bush
35 District Judge Robert Bryan Harwell Florence 1959 2004–present G.W. Bush
District Judge (vacant) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a)
District Judge (vacant) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a)
District Judge (vacant) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a) (n/a)
17 Senior District Judge Solomon Blatt Jr. Charleston 1921 1971–1990 1986–1990 1990–present Nixon
18 Senior District Judge Matthew James Perry Jr. Columbia 1921 1979–1995 (none) 1995–present Carter
20 Senior District Judge Charles Weston Houck Charleston 1933 1979–2003 1993–2000 2003–present Carter
21 Senior District Judge George Ross Anderson, Jr. Anderson 1929 1980–2009 (none) 2009–present Carter
28 Senior District Judge Henry Michael Herlong, Jr. Greenville 1944 1991–2009 (none) 2009–present G.H.W. Bush
31 Senior District Judge Patrick Michael Duffy Charleston 1943 1995–2009 (none) 2009–present Clinton

Former judges

# Judge State Born/Died Active service Term as Chief Judge Senior status Appointed by Reason for
termination
1 Drayton, Sr., WilliamWilliam Drayton, Sr. SC 1732–1790 1789[5]–1790 (none) (none) Washington, Washington death
2 Bee, ThomasThomas Bee SC 1739–1812 1790–1812 (none) (none) Washington, Washington death
3 Drayton, JohnJohn Drayton SC 1766–1822 1812–1822 (none) (none) Madison, Madison death
4 Lee, ThomasThomas Lee SC 1769–1839 1823–1839 (none) (none) Monroe, Monroe death
5 Gilchrist, Robert BuddRobert Budd Gilchrist SC 1796–1856 1839[6]–1856 (none) (none) Van Buren, Van Buren death
6 Magrath, Andrew GordonAndrew Gordon Magrath SC 1813–1893 1856–1860 (none) (none) Pierce, Pierce resignation
7 Bryan, George SeabrookGeorge Seabrook Bryan SC 1809–1905 1866–1886 (none) (none) Johnson, A.A. Johnson retirement
8 Simonton, Charles HenryCharles Henry Simonton SC 1829–1904 1886[7]–1893 (none) (none) Cleveland, Cleveland reappointment
9 Brawley, William H.William H. Brawley SC 1841–1916 1894–1911 (none) (none) Cleveland, Cleveland retirement
10 Smith, Henry Augustus MiddletonHenry Augustus Middleton Smith SC 1853–1924 1911–1912 (none) (none) Taft, Taft assignment to another court
11 Wyche, Charles CecilCharles Cecil Wyche SC 1885–1966 1965[8]–1966 (none) (none) Roosevelt, F.F. Roosevelt death
12 Martin, Jr., James RobertJames Robert Martin, Jr. SC 1909–1984 1965[9]–1979 1965–1979 1979–1984 Kennedy, Kennedy death
13 Hemphill, Robert W.Robert W. Hemphill SC 1915–1983 1965[10]–1980 1979–1980 1980–1983 Johnson, L.L. Johnson death
14 Simons, Jr., Charles EarlCharles Earl Simons, Jr. SC 1916–1999 1965[11]–1986 1980–1986 1986–1999 Johnson, L.L. Johnson death
15 Russell, Donald S.Donald S. Russell SC 1906–1998 1966–1971 (none) (none) Johnson, L.L. Johnson reappointment
16 Chapman, Robert FosterRobert Foster Chapman SC 1926–present 1971–1981 (none) (none) Nixon, Nixon reappointment
19 Hawkins, Jr., Falcon BlackFalcon Black Hawkins, Jr. SC 1927–2005 1979–1993 1990–1993 1993–2005 Carter, Carter death
22 Wilkins, William WalterWilliam Walter Wilkins SC 1942–present 1981–1986 (none) (none) Reagan, Reagan reappointment
23 Hamilton, Clyde H.Clyde H. Hamilton SC 1934–present 1981–1991 (none) (none) Reagan, Reagan reappointment
24 Henderson, Karen L.Karen L. Henderson SC 1944–present 1986–1990 (none) (none) Reagan, Reagan reappointment
27 Shedd, DennisDennis Shedd SC 1953–present 1990–2002 (none) (none) Bush, G.H.W.G.H.W. Bush reappointment
29 Traxler Jr., William ByrdWilliam Byrd Traxler Jr. SC 1948–present 1992–1998 (none) (none) Bush, G.H.W.G.H.W. Bush reappointment

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f U.S. District Courts of South Carolina, Legislative history, Federal Judicial Center.
  2. ^ The Florence, South Carolina courthouse, Federal Judicial Center.
  3. ^ The Greenville, South Carolina courthouse, Federal Judicial Center.
  4. ^ Barrett v. United States, 169 U.S. 219 (1898).
  5. ^ Recess appointment; formally nominated on February 8, 1790, confirmed by the United States Senate on February 10, 1790, and received commission on February 10, 1790.
  6. ^ Recess appointment; formally nominated on January 29, 1840, confirmed by the United States Senate on February 17, 1840, and received commission on February 17, 1840.
  7. ^ Recess appointment; formally nominated on December 9, 1886, confirmed by the United States Senate on January 13, 1887, and received commission on January 13, 1887.
  8. ^ Initially appointed to the Western District of South Carolina in 1937 by Franklin D. Roosevelt; reassigned to the District of South Carolina in 1965.
  9. ^ Initially appointed to both the Eastern District of South Carolina and the Western District of South Carolina in 1961 by John F. Kennedy; reassigned to the District of South Carolina in 1965.
  10. ^ Initially appointed to both the Eastern District of South Carolina and the Western District of South Carolina in 1964 by Lyndon B. Johnson; reassigned to the District of South Carolina in 1965.
  11. ^ Initially appointed to the Eastern District of South Carolina in 1964 by Lyndon B. Johnson; reassigned to the District of South Carolina in 1965.

External links

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