United States congressional delegations from Utah: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

These are tables of congressional delegations from Utah to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.

Contents

United States Senate

Class 1 Senators Congress Class 3 Senators
Frank J. Cannon (R) 54th (1895–1897) Arthur Brown (R)
55th (1897–1899) Joseph L. Rawlins (D)
Vacant[1] 56th (1899–1901)
Thomas Kearns (R)
57th (1901–1903)
58th (1903–1905) Reed Smoot (R)
George Sutherland (R) 59th (1905–1907)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911)
62nd (1911–1913)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917)
William H. King (D) 65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923)
68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)
71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935) Elbert D. Thomas (D)
74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)
Abe Murdock (D) 77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947)
Arthur V. Watkins (R) 80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953) Wallace F. Bennett[2] (R)
83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
Frank Moss (D) 86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965)
89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)
92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
Jake Garn (R)
94th (1975–1977)
Orrin Hatch (R) 95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983)
98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)
101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995) Robert Bennett (R)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)

House of Representatives

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1851 - 1895: One non-voting delegate from Utah Territory

See also: Utah Territory's At-large congressional district
Congress Delegate
32nd (1851–1853) John Milton Bernhisel
33rd (1853–1855)
34th (1855–1857)
35th (1857–1859)
36th (1859–1861) William Henry Hooper (D)
37th (1861–1863) John Milton Bernhisel
38th (1863–1865) John F. Kinney (D)
39th (1865–1867) William Henry Hooper (D)
40th (1867–1869)
41st (1869–1871)
42nd (1871–1873)
43rd (1873–1875) George Quayle Cannon (R)
44th (1875–1877)
45th (1877–1879)
46th (1879–1881)
47th (1881–1883) Allen G. Campbell
George Quayle Cannon[3] (R)
John Thomas Caine[4] (D)
48th (1883–1885)
49th (1885–1887)
50th (1887–1889)
51st (1889–1891) John Thomas Caine
(People's Party)
52nd (1891–1893)
53rd (1893–1895) Joseph Lafayette Rawlins (D)
54th (1895–1897) Frank Jenne Cannon (R)

1895 - 1913: One seat

After statehood, Utah had one seat elected At-large, state-wide.

Congress At-large
54th
(1895–1897)
Clarence Emir Allen (R)
55th
(1897–1899)
William H. King (D)
56th
(1899–1901)
Brigham Henry Roberts[5] (D)
William H. King
57th
(1901–1903)
George Sutherland (R)
58th
(1903–1905)
Joseph Howell (R)
59th
(1905–1907)
60th
(1907–1909)
61st
(1909–1911)
62nd
(1911–1913)

1913 - 1983: Two seats

Starting in 1913, Utah had two seats. From 1913 to 1915, those seats were elected At-large statewide. Starting in 1915, however, districts were assigned.

Congress At-large
1st At-large seat 2nd At-large seat
63rd
(1913–1915)
Joseph Howell (R) Jacob Johnson (R)
64th
(1915–1917)
District
1st 2nd
Joseph Howell (R) James Henry Mays (D)
65th
(1917–1919)
Milton H. Welling (D)
66th
(1919–1921)
67th
(1921–1923)
Don B. Colton (R) Elmer O. Leatherwood[6] (R)
68th
(1923–1925)
69th
(1925–1927)
70th
(1927–1929)
71st
(1929–1931)
Frederick C. Loofbourow (R)
72nd
(1931–1933)
73rd
(1933–1935)
Abe Murdock (D) J. W. Robinson (D)
74th
(1935–1937)
75th
(1937–1939)
76th
(1939–1941)
77th
(1941–1943)
Walter K. Granger (D)
78th
(1943–1945)
79th
(1945–1947)
80th
(1947–1949)
William A. Dawson
81st
(1949–1951)
Reva Beck Bosone (D)
82nd
(1951–1953)
83rd
(1953–1955)
Douglas R. Stringfellow (R) William A. Dawson (R)
84th
(1955–1957)
Henry Aldous Dixon (R)
85th
(1957–1959)
86th
(1959–1961)
David S. King (D)
87th
(1961–1963)
M. Blaine Peterson (D)
88th
(1963–1965)
Laurence J. Burton (R) Sherman P. Lloyd (R)
89th
(1965–1967)
David S. King (D)
90th
(1967–1969)
Sherman P. Lloyd (R)
91st
(1969–1971)
92nd
(1971–1973)
K. Gunn McKay (D)
93rd
(1973–1975)
Wayne Owens (D)
94th
(1975–1977)
Allan Turner Howe (D)
95th
(1977–1979)
David Daniel Marriott (R)
96th
(1979–1981)
97th
(1981–1983)
James V. Hansen (R)

1983 - present: Three seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd
98th
(1983–1985)
James V. Hansen (R) David Daniel Marriott (R) Howard C. Nielson (R)
99th
(1985–1987)
David Smith Monson (R)
100th
(1987–1989)
Wayne Owens (D)
101st
(1989–1991)
102nd
(1991–1993)
William Orton (D)
103rd
(1993–1995)
Karen Shepherd (D)
104th
(1995–1997)
Enid Greene (R)
105th
(1997–1999)
Merrill Cook (R) Chris Cannon (R)
106th
(1999–2001)
107th
(2001–2003)
Jim Matheson (D)
108th
(2003–2005)
Rob Bishop (R)
109th
(2005–2007)
110th
(2007–2009)
111th
(2009–2011)
Jason Chaffetz (R)

Pending 2009 legislation

The United States Senate passed the District of Columbia House Voting Rights Act of 2009 on February 26, 2009. If the bill is passed by the United States House of Representatives and signed by the President of the United States, the State of Utah will gain a new congressional district to be filled by election for the 112th United States Congress. This would increase Utah's House delegation to four members and its total congressional delegation to six members, as well as provide it with an additional elector in the Electoral College for the United States presidential election in 2012.[7]

Notes

  1. ^ Seat was vacant due to failure of legislature to elect a senator by the beginning of the congress.
  2. ^ Resigned
  3. ^ Successfully contested the election of Allen G. Campbell, but the House decided that neither was entitled to the seat.
  4. ^ Elected to fill the vacancy caused by the seat being vacated by the House.
  5. ^ Unseated for being a polygamist.
  6. ^ Died.
  7. ^ "Text of S.160 as introduced in Senate District of Columbia House Voting Rights Act of 2009". http://www.opencongress.org/bill/111-s160/text.  

Key

Key to party COLORS and ABBREVIATIONS for Members of the U.S. Congress
American (Know-Nothing) (K-N)
Adams (A) /
Anti-Jacksonian (Anti-J) /
National Republican (NR)
Anti-Administration (Anti-Admin)
Anti-Masonic (Anti-M)
Democratic (D)
Democratic-Republican (D-R)
Farmer-Labor (FL)
Federalist (F)
Free Soil (FS)
Free Silver (FSv)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Non-Partisan League (NPL)
Nullifier (N) /
States' rights (SR)
Dixicrat (Dix)
Opposition (O)
Populist (Pop)
Pro-Administration (Pro-Admin)
Progressive (Prog)
Prohibition (Proh)
Readjuster (Rea)
Republican (R)
Socialist (Soc)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
Independent /
Unaffiliated or
changed during term

See also


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