United States men's national ice hockey team: Wikis

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US National Hockey Team
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Team U.S.A., Ice Yanks
Association USA Hockey
General Manager United States Brian Burke
Head coach United States Ron Wilson 2009 - Present
Assistants United States Scott Gordon
United States John Tortorella
Captain Jamie Langenbrunner
Most games William Schneider (126)
Most points Pat LaFontaine (140)
IIHF ranking 5
Highest IIHF ranking 5 (first in 2003)
Lowest IIHF ranking 7 (first in 2006)
Team colours               
First international
 United States 29 - 0 Switzerland 
(Antwerp, Belgium; April 23, 1920)
Biggest win
 United States 31 - 1 Italy 
(St. Moritz, Switzerland; February 1, 1948)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 17 - 2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 12, 1963)
 Soviet Union 17 - 2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 15, 1969)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances 52 (first in 1930)
Best result Gold medal.svg Gold: 2 – 1933, 1960
Olympics
Appearances 20 (first in 1920)
Medals Gold medal.svg Gold: 2 - 1960, 1980
Silver medal.svg Silver: 8 - 1920, 1924, 1932, 1952, 1956, 1972, 2002, 2010
Bronze medal.svg Bronze: 1 - 1936
International record (W–L–T)
423-388-71
File:MensUSA2010hockey.png

The United States men's national ice hockey team based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The team is controlled by USA Hockey. Because of the United States' performance in the 2009 Worlds (4th place), the team moved up one spot — passing Czech Republic — to 5th in the IIHF World Rankings.[1] The United States won the silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics and the gold medal at the 1996 World Cup of Hockey. The team's most recent medal at the World Championships came in 2004 with a bronze and they won the tournament in 1960 and 1933. At the 2004 World Cup of Hockey, the U.S. was unable to defend its title, losing to Finland in the semi-finals. Most recently, the team finished fourth in the 2009 IIHF World Championship. Its current head coach is Ron Wilson. As of 2007, the United States has a total of 457,038 registered ice hockey players (0.16% of its population).[2] They are the current Olympic Silver medalists, after losing to Canada in overtime at Vancouver Olympics, 2010.

Contents

History

The American ice hockey team's greatest success was the "Miracle on Ice" at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York when they defeated the heavily favored Soviet Union on the way to a gold medal. Though hockey is not a universally popular sport in the United States, the "Miracle" is often listed as one of the greatest achievements in the history of American sports. The U.S. also won the gold medal in the 1960 games at Squaw Valley, California.

U.S. hockey has always relied on 4 or 5 NHL superstars at international competitions, with most of the rest found lower on NHL team depth charts. Notable players included Kevin Stevens, Neal Broten, Joe Mullen, Ken Morrow, Mike Ramsey, Dave Christian, and goaltender Frank Brimsek.

U.S. hockey had a spike in talent in the 1980s and 1990s with top NHL stars like Brett Hull, Jeremy Roenick, Tony Amonte, Doug Weight, Tom Barasso, Mike Richter, Brian Leetch, Chris Chelios, John LeClair, Keith Tkachuk, Pat Lafontaine and Mike Modano. As a result, the team won the 1996 World Cup and earned a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics, which the roster included additional superstars such as Chris Drury, Scott Gomez, Brian Rafalski, Jamie Langenbrunner, and Adam Deadmarsh. But by 2006, many of these NHL All-Stars had retired or lost their skill with age. Though the 2006 Olympic Team finished a disappointing 8th place, it was more of a transitional team, featuring young NHL players like Rick DiPietro, Jordan Leopold and John-Michael Liles.

The 2010 team was comprised of much younger and faster players than in previous years such as Patrick Kane, Zach Parise, Dustin Brown, Ryan Callahan, Phil Kessel, Mike Komisarek, and Bobby Ryan. At the start of the tournament, Goaltender Ryan Miller of the Buffalo Sabres was considered one of the hottest goalies in the NHL, but the U.S. was not considered to be a favorite for a medal[3]. The U.S. team upset team Canada 5-3 in the round-robin phase of the tournament and went into the single elimination phase of the tournament as the number one seeded team. After beating Finland 6-1 the U.S. advanced to the Gold Medal game where they lost in overtime 3-2 to Canada to claim the Silver Medal. The Gold Medal game between Canada and the U.S. was watched by an estimated 27.6 million U.S. households. This was the most watched hockey game in America since the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" game including any Stanley Cup Final or Winter Classic broadcast[4]. Many hockey analysts and some economists are predicting that this sudden spike of interest in hockey in the United States could give the struggling NHL a much needed boost in ratings at least for a brief amount of time, however is still unlikely due to the current TV contract the NHL has signed. [5].

2010 Olympic roster

The following is the American roster in the men's ice hockey tournament of the 2010 Winter Olympics.[6]

No. Pos.
Name
Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2009–10 team
39 G Miller, RyanRyan Miller 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000007575 kg (170 lb) 01980-07-17 17 July 1980 East Lansing, MI Buffalo Sabres (NHL)
29 G Quick, JonathanJonathan Quick 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 000000000000009191 kg (200 lb) 01986-01-21 21 January 1986 Hamden, CT Los Angeles Kings (NHL)
30 G Thomas, TimTim Thomas 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000009191 kg (200 lb) 01974-04-15 15 April 1974 Davison, MI Boston Bruins (NHL)
4 D Gleason, TimTim Gleason 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 000000000000009898 kg (220 lb) 01983-01-29 29 January 1983 Clawson, MI Carolina Hurricanes (NHL)
6 D Johnson, ErikErik Johnson 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 0000000000000107107 kg (240 lb) 01988-03-21 21 March 1988 Bloomington, MN St. Louis Blues (NHL)
3 D Johnson, JackJack Johnson 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 0000000000000102102 kg (220 lb) 01987-01-13 13 January 1987 Indianapolis, IN Los Angeles Kings (NHL)
44 D Orpik, BrooksBrooks Orpik 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000009999 kg (220 lb) 01980-09-26 26 September 1980 San Francisco, CA Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL)
28 D Rafalski, BrianBrian RafalskiA 178 cm (5 ft 10 in) 000000000000008787 kg (190 lb) 01973-09-28 28 September 1973 Dearborn, MI Detroit Red Wings (NHL)
20 D Suter, RyanRyan SuterA 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 000000000000008888 kg (190 lb) 01985-01-21 21 January 1985 Madison, WI Nashville Predators (NHL)
19 D Whitney, RyanRyan Whitney 190 cm (6 ft 3 in) 000000000000009595 kg (210 lb) 01983-02-19 19 February 1983 Scituate, MA Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
42 F Backes, DavidDavid Backes 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 0000000000000102102 kg (220 lb) 01984-05-01 1 May 1984 Blaine, MN St. Louis Blues (NHL)
32 F Brown, DustinDustin BrownA 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 000000000000009494 kg (210 lb) 01984-11-04 4 November 1984 Ithaca, NY Los Angeles Kings (NHL)
24 F Callahan, RyanRyan Callahan 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000008484 kg (190 lb) 01985-03-21 21 March 1985 Rochester, NY New York Rangers (NHL)
23 F Drury, ChrisChris Drury 179 cm (5 ft 10 in) 000000000000008686 kg (190 lb) 01976-08-20 20 August 1976 Trumbull, CT New York Rangers (NHL)
88 F Kane, PatrickPatrick Kane 178 cm (5 ft 10 in) 000000000000008181 kg (180 lb) 01988-11-19 19 November 1988 Buffalo, NY Chicago Blackhawks (NHL)
17 F Kesler, RyanRyan Kesler 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000009292 kg (200 lb) 01984-08-31 31 August 1984 Livonia, MI Vancouver Canucks (NHL)
81 F Kessel, PhilPhil Kessel 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000008282 kg (180 lb) 01987-10-02 2 October 1987 Madison, WI Toronto Maple Leafs (NHL)
15 F Langenbrunner, JamieJamie LangenbrunnerC 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 000000000000009191 kg (200 lb) 01975-07-24 24 July 1975 Cloquet, MN New Jersey Devils (NHL)
12 F Malone, RyanRyan Malone 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 0000000000000102102 kg (220 lb) 01979-12-01 1 December 1979 Pittsburgh, PA Tampa Bay Lightning (NHL)
9 F Parise, ZachZach PariseA 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000008686 kg (190 lb) 01984-07-28 28 July 1984 Prior Lake, MN New Jersey Devils (NHL)
16 F Pavelski, JoeJoe Pavelski 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000008888 kg (190 lb) 01984-07-11 11 July 1984 Plover, WI San Jose Sharks (NHL)
54 F Ryan, BobbyBobby Ryan 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000009797 kg (210 lb) 01987-03-17 17 March 1987 Cherry Hill, NJ Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
26 F Stastny, PaulPaul Stastny 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 000000000000009393 kg (210 lb) 01985-12-27 27 December 1985 Quebec City, QC, Canada Colorado Avalanche (NHL)

Defensemen Paul Martin and Mike Komisarek were initially selected, but due to injuries were replaced by Ryan Whitney and Tim Gleason.[7]

Olympic medal record
Men’s ice hockey
Silver 1920 Antwerp Ice hockey
Silver 1924 Chamonix Ice hockey
Silver 1932 Lake Placid Ice hockey
Bronze 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen Ice hockey
Silver 1952 Oslo Ice hockey
Silver 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Ice hockey
Gold 1960 Squaw Valley Ice hockey
Silver 1972 Sapporo Ice hockey
Gold 1980 Lake Placid Ice hockey
Silver 2002 Salt Lake City Ice hockey
Silver 2010 Vancouver Ice hockey

Olympic record

Canada Cup record

  • 1976 - Finished in 5th place (round robin)
  • 1981 - Finished in 4th place, lost semi-final
  • 1984 - Finished in 4th place, lost semi-final
  • 1987 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1991 - Finished in 2nd place, lost final

World Cup record

World Championship record

See: Ice Hockey World Championships and List of IIHF World Championship medalists
Note: Between 1920 and 1968, the Olympic hockey tournament was also considered the World Championship for that year.[8]
  • 1920 - Won silver medal
  • 1924 - Won silver medal
  • 1928 - Did not participate
  • 1930 - Did not participate
  • 1931 - Won silver medal
  • 1932 - Won silver medal
  • 1933 - Won gold medal
  • 1934 - Won silver medal
  • 1935 - Did not participate
  • 1936 - Won bronze medal
  • 1937 - Did not participate
  • 1938 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1939 - Won silver medal
  • 1940-46 - Not held[9]
  • 1947 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1948 - Disqualified
  • 1949 - Won bronze medal
  • 1950 - Won silver medal
  • 1951 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1952 - Won silver medal
  • 1953-1954 - Did not participate
  • 1955 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1956 - Won silver medal
  • 1957 - Did not participate
  • 1958 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1959 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1960 - Won gold medal
  • 1961 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1962 - Won bronze medal
  • 1963 - Finished in 8th place
  • 1964 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1965 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1966 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1967 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1968 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1969 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1970 - Finished in 7th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1971 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1972 - Finished in 8th place (2nd in "Pool B")[10]
  • 1973 - Finished in 8th place (2nd in "Pool B")
  • 1974 - Finished in 7th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1975 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1976 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1977 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1978 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1979 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1980 - Not held[11]
  • 1981 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1982 - Finished in 8th place
  • 1983 - Finished in 9th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1984 - Not held[11]
  • 1985 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1986 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1987 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1988 - Not held[11]
  • 1989 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1990 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1991 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1992 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1993 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1994 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1995 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1996 - Won bronze medal
  • 1997 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1998 - Finished in 12th place
  • 1999 - Finished in 6th place
  • 2000 - Finished in 5th place
  • 2001 - Finished in 4th place
  • 2002 - Finished in 7th place
  • 2003 - Finished in 13th place
  • 2004 - Won bronze medal
  • 2005 - Finished in 6th place
  • 2006 - Finished in 7th place
  • 2007 - Finished in 5th place
  • 2008 - Finished in 6th place
  • 2009 - Finished in 4th place

Others

  • 1988 Spengler Cup - Winners
  • 2002 Deutschland Cup - Finished in 2nd place[12]
  • 2003 Deutschland Cup - Winners
  • 2004 Deutschland Cup - Winners[13]
  • 2005 Deutschland Cup - Finished in 3rd place[14]
  • 2005 TUI Nations Cup - Finished in 2nd place
  • 2007 Deutschland Cup - Finished in 2nd place[15]

IIHF World Championship directorate awards

The IIHF has given awards for each year's championship tournament to the top goalie, defenseman, and forward (all since 1954), and most valuable player (since 2004). The following USA team members have won awards.

See also

References

  1. ^ World Ranking
  2. ^ http://www.usahockey.com/uploadedFiles/USAHockey/Menu_About_USA_Hockey/AnnualGuide0708(6).pdf
  3. ^ "Vancouver Games hockey preview" Sports Illustrated 15 January 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010
  4. ^ "Hockey Game Seen by 27.6 Million" The New York Times 1 March 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010
  5. ^ "Will Olympics hockey boost the NHL?"] The Christian Science Monitor 1 March 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010.
  6. ^ "Men's Ice Hockey: Team United States Tournamement Standings and Statistics". International Olympic Committee. http://www.vancouver2010.com/olympic-hockey/schedule-and-results/men_ihm400000nUSA-vtour_team_stats-SF.html. 
  7. ^ Roarke, Shawn P. (14 February 2010). "Miller the linchpin for inexperienced Americans". National Hockey League. http://www.nhl.com/ice/news.htm?id=517435. 
  8. ^ See: Ice Hockey World Championships.
  9. ^ See Ice Hockey World Championships #1930–1953: Canadian dominance. World War II forced the cancellation of the 1940 and 1944 Winter Olympics and the world championships from 1941 to 1946. "International hockey timeline". International Ice Hockey Federation. http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/history/the-iihf/timeline.html. Retrieved 2009-03-10.  (ed.) Carl Diem (January 1940). "The Fifth Olympic Winter Games Will Not Be Held" (PDF). Olympic Review (Berlin: International Olympic Institute) (8): 8–10. http://www.la84foundation.org/OlympicInformationCenter/OlympicReview/1940/ORUE8/ORUE8c.pdf. Retrieved 2009-03-10. 
  10. ^ See: 1972 World Ice Hockey Championships. For the first time, a separate tournament is held for both the World Championships and the Winter Olympics. Previously, the Winter Olympics tournament was held in lieu of a world championships, with the winner being declared world champion for that year. It also marked the first time in international ice hockey that all goaltenders were required to wear face masks.
  11. ^ a b c No championships were held during the Olympic years 1980, 1984 and 1988. See: Ice Hockey World Championships #1976–1987: First years of open competition and List of IIHF World Championship medalists.
  12. ^ USA Hockey Deutschland Cup Archives
  13. ^ 2003&2004 Deutschland Cup
  14. ^ 2005 Deutschland Cup
  15. ^ USA Hockey Deutschland/TUI Cup results

External links

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