University of Brighton: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Established 1992 — gained University Status
1968 — Brighton Polytechnic
1859 — Brighton College of Art
Type Public
Vice-Chancellor Prof Julian Crampton
Staff 2,500
Students 21,000 [1]
Undergraduates 16,515 [1]
Postgraduates 4,450 [1]
Location Falmer, Brighton, Hastings and Eastbourne, UK
50°50′33″N 0°7′9″W / 50.8425°N 0.11917°W / 50.8425; -0.11917Coordinates: 50°50′33″N 0°7′9″W / 50.8425°N 0.11917°W / 50.8425; -0.11917
Nickname Brighton Uni
Website http://www.brighton.ac.uk/

The University of Brighton is a multi-site university based in the city of Brighton & Hove (England) with an antecedent history dating back to 1859. The university occupies three sites in Brighton — at Grand Parade, Moulsecoomb, and Falmer, near the village of Falmer, several smaller sites in Eastbourne - and a building in Hastings. Known for its very good graduate employment record considering its young age, and its large yet laid back student population[2]

Contents

History

The University was formed as Brighton Polytechnic in 1968 by the merging of Brighton College of Technology and Brighton College of Art. Before the merger external University of London degrees were offered. As a polytechnic, degrees were granted under the auspices of the Council for National Academic Awards, an umbrella organisation responsible for monitoring the quality of degrees at most polytechnics during the 1960s and 70s.

Brighton Polytechnic was expanded in September 1976 by a merger with Brighton College of Education, and in April 1979 incorporated the East Sussex College of Higher Education at Eastbourne. It was awarded full university status in 1992 as the University of Brighton allowing it to offer degrees in its own right. The University's multi-site configuration is a direct result of its antecedent history.

The Cockcroft building on the Moulsecoomb campus
Mithras House

Brighton College of Technology, which had grown out of the much older Brighton Technical College, was located at Moulsecoomb in Brighton. It initially offered degrees in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Pharmacy, Computer Studies, Applied Physics and Applied Chemistry. There were about 1200 students in 1970. An appreciable number of students came from overseas, mainly from countries of the Commonwealth.

Brighton College of Education was located at Falmer, with seafront residencies in Eastern Terrace, Percival Terrace and Sussex Square in Brighton. The Falmer site is still part of the University.

Brighton College of Art was located in Grand Parade, where much of the Faculty of Arts is still based. The original founding institution for the University of Brighton was the Brighton School of Art opened in 1859 in the kitchen of the Royal Pavilion, Brighton.

In 2003 the Brighton and Sussex Medical School a joint venture with the University of Sussex in conjunction with the NHS was opened.

Rankings

  • The 'The Sunday Times University Guide 2006' (September 2006) University League Table ranks Brighton University 19th overall in the UK. It ranks Brighton 3rd in the 'Top Ten Modern Universities' in the UK (those formed after 1992). Brighton remains the only modern university to be named 'Sunday Times University of the Year' (1999) as this is normally dominated by older universities.[3]
  • Brighton university has slowly been descending down the tables contrary to its positive predictions in 2006. However, it is still holding on to its mid table seat and considering its age it has relatively good stats and prospects.'The Times University Rankings 2010' ranks Brighton University at 70th overall in the UK.[4]
  • 'The Complete University Guide Rankings 2010' ranks Brighton University at 63rd overall in the UK.[5]
  • 'The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise' (RAE) have confirmed that 79 per cent of the University of Brighton's research output is of international standing. Brighton is also ranked as the leading modern university in terms of the quality of its research by Research Fortnight. The university's RAE ranking rose from 80th place in 2001 to 59th in 2008 as titled as one of the 'Rising Stars' in the UK.[6] Sixty-five per cent of research in art and design at the Faculty of Arts was classified as either 'world leading' or 'internationally excellent'. This places Brighton amongst the leading research centres in the country for art and design and Research Fortnight ranked the submission second in terms of the volume and quality of research.[7]

Faculties and schools

There are five faculties within the university:

  • Faculty of Arts
    • School of Architecture and Design
    • School of Arts and Media
    • School of Humanities
  • Faculty of Education and Sport
    • Chelsea School
    • School of Education
    • School of Language, Literature and Communication
    • Centre for Learning and Teaching
  • Faculty of Health and Social Science
    • School of Applied Social Science
    • School of Health Professions
    • School of Nursing and Midwifery
    • Institute of Postgraduate Medicine (part of Brighton and Sussex Medical School)
  • Faculty of Management and Information Sciences
    • Brighton Business School
    • School of Service Management
    • School of Computing, Mathematical and Information Sciences
    • Centre for Research in Innovation Management (CENTRIM)
  • Faculty of Science and Engineering[8]
    • School of Environment and Technology[9]
    • School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences[10]

Educational partners

In recent years there has been a University of Brighton division at Northbrook College Sussex Worthing for its Higher Education courses.

Alumni

Arts
  • Judy Attfield - dress historian (History of Design)
  • Jeannie Baker - artist, film maker & illustrator (College of Arts)
  • Edward Bell - artist (Graphics)
  • John Bellany - poster designer
  • Hannah Berry - graphic novelist (Illustration)
  • Duncan Baker Brown - sustainable architect (Architecture)
  • Helen Chadwick - artist (Fine Art)
  • Lucy Cousins - children's writer and illustrator (Graphic Design)
  • Paula Cox - Poster Designer (Expressive Arts)
  • David Crowley - curator (History of Design)
  • Thompson Dagnall - sculptor (BA first class Hons)
  • Gary Day-Ellison - graphic designer (Graphic Design)
  • Matthew Dent - designer (Graphic Design)
  • Polly Dunbar - childrens author & illustrator (Illustration)
  • Peter Ford - printmaker (Art)
  • Clive Gardiner - poster designer
  • Emily Gravett - illustrator & children’s author (Illustration)
  • George Hardie - Royal designer for industry
  • Conrad Heighton Leigh - artist (Art)
  • Frederick C Herrick - poster designer
  • Charlotte Hodes - Jerwood drawing prize winner 2006
  • James Jarvis - illustrator (Illustration)
  • Simon Kernick - crime writer (Humanities)
  • Christopher King - resident photographer at the Tower of London (Editorial Photography)
  • Jacqueline King - British professional photographer of the year 2006 (Fashion Design with Business)
  • Akira Kuroda – novelist
  • Alison Lapper - artist and author (Fine Art)
  • Jonathan Lemon - artist/Cartoonist/Musician (Visual Performing Arts)
  • Hamish Makgill - designer (Fine Art)
  • Gillian Naylor - historian
  • Molly Parkin - artist (Art)
  • John Pasche - designer (of the Rolling Stones' "Tongue and Lips" logo) (Art)
  • Mark Power - Magnum photographer (Graphic Design)
  • Dunstan Pruden – silversmith
  • Philip Reeve - novelist (Illustration)
  • Chris Riddell - cartoonist/ works for the Observer (Graphic Design)
  • Paul Roundhill – writer and multimedia artist (Art)
  • Indre Serpytyte - Jerwood photography prize winner 2006 (Editorial Photography)
  • Madeleine Strindberg - Jerwood painting prize winner 1998
  • Kam Tang – illustrator (Graphic Design)
  • Lou Taylor - dress historian
  • Danny Treacy - Jerwood photography prize winner 2003
  • Keith Tyson – artist and Turner prize winner 2002 (Alternative Practice)
  • John Rankin Waddell – photographer (Accountancy)
  • Nicky Walsh - Jerwood photography prize winner 2008 (Photography)
  • John Watkiss - artist (Fine Arts)
  • Rachel Whiteread – artist and Turner prize winner (Painting)
  • Cliff Wright - illustrator of Harry Potter books (Illustration)
  • Carey Young - artist (Photography)
Business
  • Adam Bates - head of tourism for the city of Brighton & Hove (International Hospitality Management)
  • Caroline Brown - owner/manager Midnight Communications, South-East largest PR company
  • Amanda Chessell - computer scientist and IBM master inventor (Software Engineering)
  • Julie Howell - winner of the 2005/6 New Media Age Effectiveness Award for "greatest individual contribution to New Media" and shortlisted for a lifetime achievement prize at the Imperatives Digital Awards (Information Management)
  • Anji Hunter - former advisor to Tony Blair and now director of external affairs at Anglo American PLC (History)
  • Graham Marsden - former Mayor of Eastbourne
  • Darren Snow, OBE - youth and community worker (Youth and Community)
  • Des Turner - MP for Brighton (PGCE)
  • Martin Webb - entrepreneur, television personality and author (Business Studies)
  • Edward Wolton - information technology guru and chairman of the British Computer Society Young Professionals group (Computing)
Entertainment
  • Chris Barrie - actor (Business, did not graduate)
  • Norman Cook AKA Fat Boy Slim – DJ, musician and producer (English, Politics and Sociology)
  • Paddy Considine - actor (Photography)
  • Addison Cresswell - celebrity agent (Graphic Design)
  • Alan Donahoe – lead singer with The Rakes (Biological Sciences)
  • Graham Duff - actor and writer (Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Jamie Hornsmith - bass player for The Rakes (Art)
  • Natasha Khan - singer/songwriter for Bat for Lashes (Music & visual arts)
  • Saira Khan – TV and radio presenter (Humanities)
  • Joseph Mount - musician and founding member of Metronomy
  • Mick Quinn - bass player for Supergrass (Computing)
  • Louise Rennison - author/Comedian
  • Pooja Shah - actress (Theatre With Visual Practice)
  • Orlando Weeks - musician/artist (Illustration)
  • Jo Whiley- radio DJ and TV presenter (Applied Languages)
Fashion
  • Sarah Arnett - designer and director of local label, Simultane (Fashion Textiles Design with Business Studies)
  • Gresham Blake - celebrity suit designer (Fashion Design with Business Studies)
  • Keren Craig - fashion designer, Marchesa (Fashion Textiles Design with Business Studies)
  • Mark Eley - fashion designer, Eley Kishimoto (Fashion design)
  • Barbara Hulanicki - founder of Biba (Fashion)
  • Julien MacDonald - fashion designer (Fashion Textiles)
Health
  • Vernon Wesley OBE - Sheffield NHS Podiatry Service (Podiatry)
  • Christopher Mercer - Chair of the Manipulation Association of Chartered Physiotherapists. (Physiotherapy)
International
  • William L S Chan, JP ( Justice of Peace ) member of HKSAR Southern District Council, President of Hong Kong Electrical Contractors' Association (Electrical Engineering)
  • Adbul Rahim Abu Bakar - vice president of Petronas (Electrical Engineering)
  • Tan Sri Datuk Dr. Ahmad Tajuddin Ali - chairman of Gas Malaysia (Electrical Engineering)
  • Dato Halim Hussin - senior vice president Telekom Malaysia Bhd. (Electrical Engineering)
  • Datuk Ir. (Dr.) Mohd Annas Mohd Nor - former chairman of the Malaysian Energy Commission – Malaysia (Electrical Engineering)
  • Tan Sri Dato Seri Ir. (Dr.) Shamsuddin Kadir - chairman of Sapura Holdings, Malaysia (Electrical Engineering)
  • Prof. Zainal Abidin Sharif - Vice-Chancellor of the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (Electrical Engineering)
  • Nazeem Mahatey - research officer and speech writer for Thabo Mbeki, former President of South Africa (Media Assisted Language Teaching and Learning)
  • Robert Morgan- Religious Preacher famed for turning water into wine
Sport
  • Kate Allenby - British Olympic pentathlon athlete Bronze medal-winner, Sydney 2000 (Sport Science)
  • Dr Gary Brickley- British Paralympic cycling Team coach (Sports Science)
  • Jonathan Ceri Griffiths- professional Judo athlete, Commonwealth Bronze medalist, 2000 (Sports Science)
  • Ben Hawes - Great Britain Hockey Team (Sports Technology)
  • Steve Ingham - senior sports physiologist in the Olympic Medical Institute (Sports Science)
  • Peter Keen OBE - coach to British Olympic cycling team
  • Steve Purdie - British Paragliding Champion (Mechanical Engineering)
  • David Stone, MBE - double Paralympic gold medal winner, 2008 (Social Work)
  • Tanya Streeter - world champion Free Diver and TV presenter (Public Administration)
  • Tim Dawes - surrey and england cricketer, (sports product design)

Halls of residence

  • Moulsecoomb campus
    • Moulsecoomb Place
  • Falmer campus
    • Great Wilkins
    • Paddock Field
  • Grand Parade campus
    • Phoenix Brewery
  • Varley Halls
    • Ashdown House
    • Balcombe, Chailey & Ditchling
    • Framfield, Selsey, Kingston & Chalvington
  • Eastbourne campus
    • Welkin Halls
  • University Centre Hastings
    • Robert Tressell Halls

See also

References

External links

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