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University of Wisconsin–Superior
UW-Superior logo.jpg
Established 1893
Type State university
Chancellor Julius Erlenbach
Faculty 110
Staff 322
Students 2,800
Undergraduates 2,500
Postgraduates 300
Location Superior, WI, USA
Sports Yellowjackets
Colors Old Gold & Black             
Mascot Buzz the Yellowjacket
Website www.uwsuper.edu
Main entrance of the UW–Superior, with Campus Welcome Center in foreground.

The University of Wisconsin–Superior (also known as UW–Superior, UWS or Superior) is a public university located in Superior, Wisconsin. UW–Superior grants bachelor's, master's, and specialist's degrees. The university currently enrolls 2,500 undergraduate and 300 graduate students.

Contents

History

Originally named Superior Normal School, the university was founded by Wisconsin legislators as a school to train teachers in 1893. Superior Normal School's first class graduated in 1897. In 1909 the institution became Wisconsin's first normal school to offer a full-scale training program for the new idea of kindergarten. It also was the first to offer a four-year program for high school teachers beginning in 1923. After authorization to grant bachelor's degrees in education in 1926, the school took on the new name of Superior State Teachers College. Graduate degrees were authorized in 1947 and first offered in 1950. In 1951 the state board of regents changed the institution's name to Wisconsin State College-Superior to better reflect its expanding role. Wisconsin's state colleges eventually were reclassified as universities, resulting in another name change in 1964 to Wisconsin State University-Superior. Finally, in 1971 Superior became part of the University of Wisconsin System and acquired its present name.[1]

Mission

UW–Superior has been designated as the public liberal arts college in the University of Wisconsin System, and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. The University of Wisconsin–Superior fosters intellectual growth and career preparation within a liberal arts tradition that emphasizes individual attention and embodies respect for diverse cultures and multiple voices.

Major campus buildings

  • Barstow Hall, named for regent Barney Barstow: science programs
  • Erlanson Hall, named for regent Clarence Erlanson: business programs, Distance Learning Center, Transportation and Logistics Research Center
  • Gates Physical Education Building/Health & Wellness Center, named for regent Clough Gates: health & human performance programs, recreation, Mortorelli Gym, Thering Field House
  • Hawkes Hall, named for regent Elizabeth Hawkes: built as a residence hall, but now mainly houses non-university office space
  • Holden Fine Arts Center, named for campus benefactor Paul Holden: communicating arts, music, and visual arts programs, Wisconsin Public Radio studios (KUWS/WHSA), Manion Theatre
  • Jim Dan Hill Library, named for the university's fifth president (1931-1964)
  • McCaskill Hall, named for second president Virgil McCaskill (1907-1922): education and science programs, Lake Superior Research Institute,Technology Resource Center, Kathryn Ohman Theatre
  • Old Main, administration and student services, psychology program
  • Rothwell Student Center, named for alumnus and state education superintendent Angus Rothwell
  • Sundquist Hall, named for regent George Sundquist: social sciences, languages, mathematics and computer science, First Nations Center
  • Wessman Arena, named for regent Siinto Wessman
  • Yellowjacket Union, this building is under construction and will replace Rothwell Student Center

Residence halls

  • Crownhart Hall, named for regent Charles Crownhart
  • Curran Hall, named for regent Robert Curran
  • McNeill Hall, named for first president Israel McNeill (1896-1907)
  • Ostrander Hall, named for regent Frank Ostrander
  • Ross Hall, named for regent Frank Ross

Athletics

UW–Superior’s athletic teams, nicknamed the Yellowjackets, are affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III class and are members of the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (WIAC). The Yellowjacket men’s and women’s hockey teams compete in the Northern Collegiate Hockey Association (NCHA). In 2002, the men's hockey team won the NCAA Division III National Championship.

Men's sports Women's sports
Baseball Basketball
Basketball Cross country
Cross Country Golf
Ice Hockey (2002 National Champions) Ice Hockey
Soccer Soccer
Track and Field Softball
Track and Field
Volleyball

Recognitions

Notable alumni

References

  1. ^ a b UW–Superior - About - Campus History

External links

Coordinates: 46°43′05″N 92°05′24″W / 46.718100°N 92.090000°W / 46.718100; -92.090000

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University of Wisconsin–Superior

Established:1893
Type:State university
Chancellor:Julius Erlenbach
Faculty:110
Staff:322
Students:2,800
Undergraduates:2,500
Postgraduates:300
Location:Superior, WI, USA

Sports:Yellowjackets
Colors:Old Gold & Black            
Mascot:Buzz the Yellowjacket
Website:www.uwsuper.edu

The University of Wisconsin-Superior (also known as UW-Superior, UWS or Superior) is a public university located in Superior, Wisconsin. UW-Superior grants bachelor's, master's, and specialist's degrees. The university currently enrolls 2,500 undergraduate and 300 graduate students.

Contents

History

Originally named Superior Normal School, the university was founded by Wisconsin legislators as a school to train teachers in 1893. Superior Normal School's first class graduated in 1897. In 1909 the institution became Wisconsin's first normal school to offer a full-scale training program for the new idea of kindergarten. It also was the first to offer a four-year program for high school teachers beginning in 1923. After authorization to grant bachelor's degrees in education in 1926, the school took on the new name of Superior State Teachers College. Graduate degrees were authorized in 1947 and first offered in 1950. In 1951 the state board of regents changed the institution's name to Wisconsin State College-Superior to better reflect its expanding role. Wisconsin's state colleges eventually were reclassified as universities, resulting in another name change in 1964 to Wisconsin State University-Superior. Finally, in 1971 Superior became part of the University of Wisconsin System and acquired its present name.[1]

Mission

UW-Superior has been designated as the public liberal arts college in the University of Wisconsin System, and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. The University of Wisconsin-Superior fosters intellectual growth and career preparation within a liberal arts tradition that emphasizes individual attention and embodies respect for diverse cultures and multiple voices.

Major campus buildings

  • Barstow Hall, named for regent Barney Barstow: science programs
  • Erlanson Hall, named for regent Clarence Erlanson: business programs, Distance Learning Center, Transportation and Logistics Research Center
  • Gates Physical Education Building/Health & Wellness Center, named for regent Clough Gates: health & human performance programs, recreation, Mortorelli Gym, Thering Field House
  • Hawkes Hall, named for regent Elizabeth Hawkes: built as a residence hall, but now mainly houses non-university office space
  • Holden Fine Arts Center, named for campus benefactor Paul Holden: communicating arts, music, and visual arts programs, Wisconsin Public Radio studios (KUWS/WHSA), Manion Theatre
  • Jim Dan Hill Library, named for the university's fifth president (1931-1964)
  • McCaskill Hall, named for second president Virgil McCaskill (1907-1922): education and science programs, Lake Superior Research Institute,Technology Resource Center, Kathryn Ohman Theatre
  • Old Main, administration and student services, psychology program
  • Rothwell Student Center, named for alumnus and state education superintendent Angus Rothwell
  • Sundquist Hall, named for regent George Sundquist: social sciences, languages, mathematics and computer science, First Nations Center
  • Wessman Arena, named for regent Siinto Wessman
  • Yellowjacket Union, this building is under construction and will replace Rothwell Student Center

Residence halls

  • Crownhart Hall, named for regent Charles Crownhart
  • Curran Hall, named for regent Robert Curran
  • McNeill Hall, named for first president Israel McNeill (1896-1907)
  • Ostrander Hall, named for regent Frank Ostrander
  • Ross Hall, named for regent Frank Ross

Athletics

UW-Superior’s athletic teams, nicknamed the Yellowjackets, are affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III class and are members of the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (WIAC). The Yellowjacket men’s and women’s hockey teams compete in the Northern Collegiate Hockey Association (NCHA). In 2002, the men's hockey team won the NCAA Division III National Championship.

Men's Athletic Programs

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Hockey
  • Soccer
  • Track & Field

Women's Athletic Programs

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Hockey
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Recognitions

Notable alumni

References

  1. ^ a b UW-Superior - About - Campus History

External links

Coordinates: 46°43′05″N 92°05′24″W / 46.718100°N 92.090000°W / 46.718100; -92.090000


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