Urethral sponge: Wikis

  

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Female internal reproductive anatomy

The urethral sponge is a spongy cushion of tissue, found in the lower genital area of women, that sits against both the pubic bone and vaginal wall, and surrounds the urethra.

Contents

Functions

The urethral sponge is composed of erectile tissue; during arousal, it becomes swollen with blood, compressing the urethra, helping prevent urination during sexual activity (along with the pubococcygeus muscle).

Female ejaculation

Additionally, the urethral sponge contains the Skene's glands, which might be involved in female ejaculation, although the existence and nature of female ejaculation remains a medical controversy.

Sexual stimulation

The urethral sponge encompasses a large number of nerve endings, and can, therefore, be stimulated through the front wall of the vagina. Some women enjoy the rear-entry position of sexual intercourse for this reason, because the penis is often angled slightly downward and can stimulate the front wall of the vagina, and in turn, the urethral sponge.

Relation with the G-spot

The urethral sponge is often synonymously called the G-spot (Gräfenberg spot)[1], although some say that the two are separate. Some women experience intense pleasure from stimulation of the urethral sponge and others find the sensation irritating. The urethral sponge also surrounds the clitoral nerve, and since the two are so closely interconnected, stimulation of the clitoris may stimulate the nerve endings of the urethral sponge.

Although the G-spot is supposed to exist, it has been recently doubted by a team at The King's College in London. Their study is the biggest yet, involving 1,800 woman which found no proof that the G-spot even exists therefore believing that the "G-spot" may be a figment of woman's imagination, which has been encouraged by magazines, sex therapists and suggestive therapeutics.[2] [3]

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