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Urglaawe ("primal faith" in Deitsch) is a tradition within Heathenry and bears strong affinity with Asatru and other traditions related to historical Germanic paganism. It derives its core from the Deitsch healing practice of Braucherei[1] and from other Germanic and Scandinavian sources. Urglaawe uses both the English and Deitsch languages.

As with other Teutonic religious and philosophical traditions, adherents of Urglaawe may have differing beliefs[2] that range from polytheistic reconstructionism to syncretist (eclectic), pragmatic psychologist or mysticist approaches.

The sickle is one of the primary symbols of Urglaawe.

Contents

Beliefs

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Deities

Adherents of Urglaawe are polytheists. Most believe that there are separate, individual deities with their own personalities, capabilities, and foibles. The deities are not viewed as omniscient or omnipotent.[3]

Ethics

Ethics in Urglaawe are guided by a concept of personal Urleeg or Wurt, which is a concept related to both luck and fate, though the concept of the future is not predestined; it is, instead, based on the most likely outcome of the situation in the present.[4]

Urglaawe recognizes the ethics code presented by the Asatru Folk Assembly and the Odinic Rite called the Nine Noble Virtues. In addition to the nine virtues, Urglaawe adds "wisdom, introspection, kinship, appropriate compassion, and a curiosity to learn more about the universe around us." [5]

A pronounced sense of ecological stewardship[6][7] and spirituality is encouraged, as is the concept of frith.[8]

Rites

The primary deities of Urglaawe are the same as those of Norse Mythology (see list of Norse gods). However, the perceptions of individual deities may differ. For example, one of the principle deities in Urglaawe is Holle.[9]

An Urglaawe altar for the Sege to the goddess Zisa.

Urglaawe also has a component of ancestor veneration. The deities are viewed as elder kin.[10] There are numerous entities, such as wights, dwarves, and elves that are also venerated.

Sege

The Sege is similar to the Asatru blót and consists of the blessing of a libation (usually mead, apple cider, ale, or elderberry rob[11]) that is passed in a beer stein among participants. A different deity (or group of deities) is usually honored at different events based on the purpose of the Sege. After the stein is passed around for one quaff, the remainder of the libation is poured from the stein into a bowl. Participants are sprinkled with a bit of the libation as a blessing from the deities. It is then poured into the soil or into a creek as an offering to the honored deity.[12]

Sammel

The features of the Sammel, or the gathering, are based on the ceremonial structures of Braucherei and are influenced by Asatru sumble. A blessed beverage (usually mead, apple cider, ale, or elderberry rob) is passed among the members for three rounds. The first round usually consists of toasts to a Teutonic deity; the second is usually to ancestors or heroes; the third is for toasting to anyone. At the end of each round, a small amount of the libation is poured into a bowl, which is later poured into the soil or into a creek or stream as an offering to the Teutonic deities and to the wights.[13]

Distribution

Today, Urglaawe is practiced in Pennsylvania, Illinois, Florida, Massachusetts, and Louisiana. Groups and practitioners also exist in other areas. The exact number of adherents worldwide is unknown, particularly as adherents may follow Urglaawe as well as similar traditions, such as Asatru.

Structure

Urglaawe may be practiced in solitude or in groups. Organized groups are called Sippschafts and may be either formal and legal church entities or simply nominal structures. While Urglaawe focuses on the Heathen elements surviving in the Pennsylvania German culture [14] and is a tribalist movement, there is little emphasis on the ancestry of a particular individual. As the Pennsylvania German healing practice of Braucherei sheltered many Heathen practices but was not complete, Urglaawe draws what it can from Braucherei and reconstructs the remainder based on Teutonic lore. Thus, in a manner similar to Folketro, Urglaawe finds its core in the local traditions and then finds additional background from Continental Germanic and Scandinavian sources.[15]

Symbols

Urglaawe makes use of the numerous Hex Signs, or barn stars, that are common in the Deitsch culture. [16]

List of organizations

References

  • Clubb, Orva Gaile, 2009. Frau Holda's Tale. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom pp 3-4, 10-13. Autumn 2009. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.
  • Krasskova, Galina, 2009. Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner. Franklin Lakes, NJ: Career Press.
  • Lusch, Robert, 2009. Living Land. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom p 16. Spring 2009. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.
  • Lusch, Robert, 2009. An Urglaawe Celebration of Walpurgisnacht. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom p 16. Summer 2009. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.
  • Lusch, Robert, 2009. Hoietfescht. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom p 10. Autumn 2009. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.
  • Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  • Tobin, Jesse, 2008. Elder Berry Cordial. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom p 2. May 2007. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.
  • Tobin, Jesse, 2008. Es Pennsylfaanisch Muunraad. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom p 4. May 2008. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.

Notes

  1. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe pp 10-11. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  2. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 14. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  3. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 9. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  4. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 18. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  5. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 19. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  6. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 19. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  7. ^ Lusch, Robert, 2009. Living Land. In "Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom" p 16. Spring 2009. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.
  8. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 20. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  9. ^ Clubb, Orva Gaile, 2009. Frau Holda's Tale. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom pp 3-4, 10-13. Autumn 2009. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center
  10. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 9. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  11. ^ Tobin, Jesse, 2008. Elder Berry Cordial. In Hollerbeier Haven: Journal of Traditional Deitsch Wisdom p 2. May 2007. Kempton, PA: Three Sisters Center.
  12. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe pp 24-25. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  13. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe pp 17, 24-25. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  14. ^ Krasskova, Galina, 2009. Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner p 24. Franklin Lakes, NJ: Career Press.
  15. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe pp 29-30. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.
  16. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L., 2009. A Brief Introduction to Urglaawe p 11. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, LLC.

See also

External links


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