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V-Tech Rampage
Developer(s) Ryan Lambourn
Platform(s) Adobe Flash Player
Genre(s) Action
Mode(s) Single player
Rating(s) OFLC: MA15+
Input methods Keyboard
Mouse

V-Tech Rampage is a controversial amateur action computer game that re-creates the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre on the campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. The game was created by 21-year-old Ryan Lambourn from Australia.[1] The Flash-based game first came to light when it was uploaded to Newgrounds using Lambourn's screen name Master PiGPEN.

The previous prominent virtual school shooting reenactment, Super Columbine Massacre RPG!, (SCMRPG!) is an RPG and has received praise for artistic merit as well as condemnation. V-Tech Rampage was created to be offensive[2] without redeeming value.[1][2]

Contents

Gameplay

The game is a one-person work released weeks after the Virginia Tech massacre, a level of effort that shows. Its graphics and control are both intentionally and amusingly clumsy. The player controls Seung-Hui Cho, the killer, through "3 levels of stealth and murder!" in a slanted overhead view. The player must walk across Virginia Tech campus to shoot Emily, Cho's first victim, without killing too many other people or scaring Emily away. In the second, he must walk across the same campus while avoiding the searchlights of police investigators. This is the only segment with appreciable challenge. In the third, he barricades the exit of a school building and must shoot everyone inside in 90 seconds before the police arrive to arrest him. During this level, a favorite song of Cho's plays while audio clips praise or laugh at murder, or scold the player for merely wounding. The game finishes with Cho's suicide. Without failures, all three take no more than a few minutes.

Cho monologues about mission goals and can also speak to other characters, whose reactions differ depending on whether they're fleeing Cho or not. The game's dialogue has occasional grammar or spelling errors, and is riddled with obscenities, insults, racist terms, scatological references and offers of sex from female characters in exchange for their lives.

Events

Lambourn offered to remove the game if he received $2,000 in "donations." For an additional $1,000 he offered to apologize.

"Attention angry people: I will take this game down from newgrounds [the games website] if the donation amount reaches $1000 US. I'll take it down from here [his website] if it reaches $2000 US, and I will apologise if it reaches $3000 US." [1]

Lambourn later retracted the offer to remove the game, stating:

…the donation thing is there as a joke against all the people commanding me to take my game down. I didn't think anyone would donate money to it and so far my paypal account has proven me right…[3]

More recently, an "RIAA edition" was created, with the original tracks removed, due to copyright infringement with the RIAA. This has replaced the original version on Newgrounds, The original edition was until recently available on Lambourns site, However it has since been removed due to further threats from the RIAA, Now the RIAA edition is the only available one with the title music "Hey Hey Hey Fuck The RIAA" on a looped track.

Observant players will also notice that Ryan Clark was incorrectly portrayed as Caucasian when the game was first created; this has since been fixed.

Impact

The game was compared to SCMRPG! [4] due to the re-creation of a mass murder in which the player controls the killer through a video game. Danny Ledonne, creator of SCMRPG! posted a comment on Lambourn's website:

Inevitably, comparisons between SCMRPG and VTech Rampage are being made right now… For myself I wish to point out that SCMRPG was never a for-profit endeavor and thus I never posted statements like that which is on the VTR game’s homepage: “I will take this game down from newgrounds if the donation amount reaches $1000 US, i’ll take it down from here if it reaches $2000 US, and i will apologize if it reaches $3000 US.” This quote seems to indicate that Ryan has no intention of leaving the game up permanently or having a channel for discourse (as I have done) but instead has unfortunately chosen an artist’s statement that reads more like a hostage note… I would like to ask bloggers to consider not whether a game about the Virginia Tech shooting SHOULD be made but how we might go about making a game that accomplishes more than VTR does with the subject matter. [5]

New York State Senator Andrew Lanza, chair of the Senate Task Force on Youth Violence and the Entertainment Industry requested that the gaming community boycott the game.[6] However, video game publications wrote of concerns about backlashes against video games and wrote that this game was created by an individual, not the gaming industry. [7]

GamesRadar.com ranked the game as 4th in the Top 7 Most Evil Games.[8]

See also

References

External links


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

V-Tech Rampage

Developer(s) Ryan Lambourn
Publisher(s) Googum Produce
Release date May 14, 2007
Genre RPG, Flash
Mode(s) Single player
Age rating(s) N/A
Platform(s) Flash, PC
Credits | Soundtrack | Codes | Walkthrough


V-Tech Rampage is a controversial computer game that re-creates the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre on the campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. The game was created by 21-year old Australian Ryan Lambourn "because it's funny." The flash-based game first came to light when it was uploaded to popular gaming site newgrounds.com using Lambourn's screen name Master PiGPEN. The game is available free for play at Newgrounds.com and his personal website googumproduce.com. The game is 1.1 Megabytes.

Contents

Gameplay

The game basically reenacts the events of the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre. The player plays as Seung-Hui Cho and is armed with two pistols. There are 3 levels and cut scenes between each one of them. The game is similar to a RPG in which the player is able to talk with characters or shoot them.

In the first level the player must kill Emily and any witnesses to the murder. If the player fires massively killing people he will fail by scaring away Emily.

In the second level the player must avoid policemen and deliver a package to the mailbox then head to Norris Hall. The player walks faster than the policemen, but if he gets caught in the police's lights he fails.

In the third level the player must kill or Injure everyone in Norris hall within 1 minute and 30 seconds. If everyone is not kill the player will be tackled down by police.

The game ends with the player shooting himself and the screens shows Cho's hand with a carving that says Ismail Ax.

Keys

A : Fire

S :Talk

A+X: Skip levels

RIAA Edition

The "RIAA edition" was created, with the original tracks removed, due to copyright infringement with the RIAA. This has replaced the original version on Newgrounds, while both editions are available on Lambourn's site. The original version was later removed from Lambourn's site. The RIAA edition removed the music from level one and two which were repeated clips from "Shine" by Collective Soul and "Mr. Brownstone" by Guns N' Roses, Cho's favorite song. The music was replaced with MIDI versions of the songs.

The song for the third level is KEKEKE is by Ryan Lambourn which was kept in the RIAA Edition. A extended verision of the song is available for download on his site.

Controversy

On May 14, 2007 V-Tech Rampage first appeared on Newgrounds.

On May 15, 2007 Lambourn wrote on his site:

"Attention angry people: I will take this game down from newgrounds [the games website] if the donation amount reaches $1000 US. I'll take it down from here [his website] if it reaches $2000 US, and i will apologise if it reaches $3000 US."

Lambourn later retracted the offer to remove the game, stating:

Later Lambourn posted that "I will never make a pun again if the donation amount reaches $1000 US, i'll never make a sarcastic comment if it reaches $2000 US, and i will never push the ironic envelope again if it reaches $3000 US."

On May 17, 2007 New York Senator Andrew Lanza, chair of the Senate Task Force on Youth Violence and the Entertainment Industry requested that the gaming community boycott the game. He also compared the game to GTA IV

In response, video game publications wrote of concerns about backlashes against video games and wrote that this game was created by an individual, not the gaming industry.

On May 18, 2007 NBC in Washington DC interviews Lambourn who tell them the reason he made the game is "You do it for some negative reaction to laugh at."

Australian politician Minister Senator Helen Coonan also started to investigate Ryan Lambourn. She states that Lambourn should should seek help, and that her agency will launch an official inquiry into V-Tech Rampage.

On May 22, 2007 Newgrounds reports that they will stands behind the decision to keep V-Tech Rampage Available on theirs site

On June 18, 2007 The original V-Tech Rampage game was pulled from Newgrounds because of a Cease and Desist letter from the RIAA. This caused Lambourn to replace the game with the RIAA edition.

External Links

  • Googumproduce
  • Super Columbine creator comments

This article uses material from the "V-Tech Rampage" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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