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The Venerable is used as a style or epithet in several Christian churches. It is also the common English language translation of a number of Buddhist titles.

Contents

Christianity

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Roman Catholic

In the Roman Catholic Church's Latin rite, The Venerable is the style used for a person who has been posthumously declared "heroic in virtue" during the investigation and process leading to possible canonization as a saint. Before a person is considered to be venerable he or she must be declared as such by a proclamation, approved by the pope, of having lived a life that was "heroic in virtue" -- the virtues being the Theological Virtues of faith, hope and charity and the Cardinal Virtues of prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance. The next step is beatification, at which point the person is referred to as The Blessed, and then finally canonization, at which point the person is referred to as Saint. Two modern and well-known examples of those who have been declared venerable are Popes John Paul II and Pius XII, who were both declared venerable by Pope Benedict XVI in December 2009 and who are likely to be beatified soon.

The 7th century English monk St. Bede was referred to as being venerable soon after his death and, by tradition, is therefore often referred to as "The Venerable Bede" despite his also having been canonized. St Bede was the first person to be recorded as The Venerable.

Stages of Canonization in the Roman Catholic Church
  Servant of God   →   Venerable   →   Blessed   →   Saint  

Anglicanism

In the Anglican Communion "The Venerable" (abbreviated as "the Ven") is the style given to an archdeacon.

Buddhism

In Buddhism, the Western style of Venerable (also abbreviated as Ven.) is entitled to ordained Buddhist monks and nuns and also to novices (shramaneras). The title of Master may be followed for senior members of the Sangha. Venerable, along with ""Reverend"" (Rev.) is used as a western alternative to Maha Thera in the Theravada branch and Shì (釋, as in "Sakya") in Chinese Mahayana branch.[1]

See also

References


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

VENERABLE (Lat. venerabilis, worthy of reverence, venerari, to reverence, to worship, allied to Venus, love; the Indo-Germ. root is wen-, to desire, whence Eng. "win," properly to struggle for, hence to gain), worthy of honour, respect and reverence, especially a term applied to dignified or honourable age. It is specifically used as a title of address given to archdeacons in the Anglican Church. It was naturally a term of respectful address from early times; thus St Augustine (Epist. 76, 88, 139) cites it of bishops, and Philip I. of France was styled venerabilis and venerandus (see Du Cange, Gloss. s.v. Venerabilitas). In the Roman Church the granting of the title "venerable" is the first step in the long process of the canonization of saints (see Canonization) .


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Simple English

image of the Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. Raphael's Cathedral, Dubuque, Iowa.]]
	

The Venerable is used as a style in several Christian churches. It is also the common English-language translation of a number of Buddhist titles.

Roman Catholic

In the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church, The Venerable, is the style used for a person who has been posthumously declared "heroic in virtue" during the investigation and process leading to possible canonization as a saint. Before a person is considered to be venerable, he or she must be declared as such by a proclamation, approved by the Pope, of having lived a life that was "heroic in virtue" – the virtues being the Theological Virtues of faith, hope, and charity and the Cardinal Virtues of prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance. The next step is beatification, at which point the person is referred to as The Blessed, and finally canonization, at which point the person is referred to as Saint. Two modern and well-known examples of those who have been declared venerable are Popes John Paul II and Pius XII, who were both declared venerable by Pope Benedict XVI in December 2009, and who are likely to be beatified soon.

The 7-8th-century English monk St. Bede was referred to as being venerable soon after his death and, by tradition, is therefore often referred to as "the Venerable Bede" despite his also having been canonized. St Bede was the first person to be recorded as The Venerable.

Stages of Canonization in the Catholic Church
  Servant of God   →   Venerable   →   Blessed   →   Saint  

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