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Ventricle (heart): Wikis

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In the heart, a ventricle is a chamber which collects blood from an atrium (another heart chamber that is smaller than a ventricle) and pumps it out of the heart, common reference systole. Interventricular means between two or more ventricles (for example the interventricular septum), while intraventricular means within one ventricle (for example an intraventricular block).

In a four-chambered heart, such as that in humans, there are two ventricles: the right ventricle pumps blood into the pulmonary circulation for the lungs, and the left ventricle pumps blood into the systemic circulation through the aorta for the rest of the body. (See Double circulatory system for details.)

Ventricles have thicker walls than atria and can withstand higher blood pressures. This is because the ventricles have to pump blood throughout the body and lungs, while the atria only have to fill the ventricles. Further, the left ventricle has thicker walls than the right because it needs to pump blood to most of the body while the right ventricle fills only the lungs.

Contents

In systole and diastole

During systole, the ventricles contract, pumping blood through the body. During diastole, the ventricles relax and fill with blood again.

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End-diastolic dimension

In cardiology, a common measure of the heart and its performance is the end-diastolic dimension. This is the size, usually measured in millimeters, of one of the ventricles at the end of diastole.[1]

The left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD or sometimes LVDD) refers to the left ventricle, while right ventricular end-diastolic dimension (RVEDD or sometimes RVDD) refers to the right ventricle.

End-systolic dimension

This is similar to the end-diastolic dimension, but is measured at the end of systole (after the ventricles have pumped out blood) rather than at the end of diastole.

The left ventricular end-systolic dimension (LVESD or sometimes LVSD) refers to the left ventricle, while right ventricular end-systolic dimension (RVESD or sometimes RVSD) refers to the right ventricle.

See also

References

  1. ^ National Health Services Scotland - Information Services Division. "Right Ventricular End-Diastolic Dimension". http://www.datadictionaryadmin.scot.nhs.uk/isddd/18597.html. Retrieved 15 Jan 2010. 

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