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Villiers High School
Location
Boyd Avenue
Southall, Middlesex, England
Information
Type Comprehensive
Established 1907
LEA Ealing
Ofsted number 101928
Headteacher Ms Juliet Strang
Gender mixed
Age 11 to 16 (11-19 from 2009)
Enrollment 1,200 approx
Website

Villiers High School is a mixed comprehensive school and technology college, located in Southall in the borough of Ealing, West London, United Kingdom. The school has approximately 1,200 students and around 80 teaching staff.

Villiers is notable as a school for refugees: many of its students come from war-torn zones, and the majority of students do not have English as a first language.

Contents

History

The school opened as Southall County School in 1907, and changed its name to Southall Grammar in 1945. In 1963 the school was renamed Southall Technical School, under which name it ran for 11 years, until was named Villiers High School in 1974. As of 2009 the school has been extended by the addition of a sixth form.

At least since 2004, the school has taken in many refugees from around the world, some of them from war zones,[1] and has come to be known as a "refugee high school" with students from 61 countries.[2][3] For 92% of the students, English is not their first language. New students are teamed up with a welcome prefect who speaks their native language and helps them for two weeks, and are assessed by a teaching assistant; language education is tailored to each student's needs.[1]

In 2003, the school was one of three to receive ₤3000 from the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund for its work with refugee children.[4]

Technology

Villiers is a technology school, whose core subject at GCSE is Design and Technology. It has gained national attention with a number of technology related projects.[5][6][7]

Academic achievement

In 2000, 45% of students got 5 or more GCSEs at grade A*-C; in 2004, this percentage had risen to 45%[1] In 2009 the school recorded 51% of pupils with 5 or more GCSEs at grade A*-C, slightly above the national average.[citation needed]

Notable faculty

References

  1. ^ a b c Noakes, Beth (1 September 2004). "Found in Translation". Times Educational Supplement. http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=399759. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  2. ^ Koch, Kathryn (12 December 2006). "Selling trees, honoring Singer Students raise money for trip to Britain and France". Marshfield Mariner. http://www.wickedlocal.com/marshfield/homepage/8999360104238425087. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  3. ^ Nickerson, Janice (16 April 2006). "Travel program honors teen's memory". The Boston Globe. http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2006/04/16/travel_program_honors_teens_memory/. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  4. ^ Curtis, Polly (13 February 2003). "Schools rewarded for work with asylum-seekers". The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2003/feb/13/schools.uk. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  5. ^ "January's Practice News Day". BBC News. 23 January 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/school_report/7188970.stm. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  6. ^ "January's Practice News Day". BBC News. 30 January 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/school_report/7842302.stm. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  7. ^ "Making the news with a comic edge". BBC News. 16 July 2008. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/school_report/6303797.stm. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  8. ^ Thomas, Jessica (6 January 2009). "Chiswick honoured for food, the arts, sport and learning". The Hounslow Chronicle. http://www.hounslowchronicle.co.uk/west-london-news/local-hounslow-news/2009/01/06/chiswick-honoured-for-food-the-arts-sport-and-learning-109642-22617658/. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  9. ^ "New Year list honours 7/7 heroes". BBC News. 31 December 2008. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/london/7805039.stm. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  10. ^ Gates, James (2 January 2009). "Ealing residents scoop New Year's Honours". Ealing Gazette. http://www.ealinggazette.co.uk/ealing-news/local-ealing-news/2009/01/02/ealing-residents-scoop-new-year-s-honours-64767-22594624/. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
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Villiers High School
Location
Boyd Avenue
Southall, Greater London, England
Coordinates 51°30′35″N 0°22′23″W / 51.5097°N 0.3731°W / 51.5097; -0.3731Coordinates: 51°30′35″N 0°22′23″W / 51.5097°N 0.3731°W / 51.5097; -0.3731
Information
Type Comprehensive, Community
Established 1907
LEA Ealing
Ofsted number 101928
Headteacher Ms Juliet Strang
Gender coeducational
Age 11 to 16 (11-19 from 2009)
Enrollment 1,200 approx
Website

Villiers High School is a mixed comprehensive school located in Southall in the London Borough of Ealing, west London, United Kingdom. The school is a specialist technology college and has approximately 1,200 students and around 80 teaching staff.

Contents

History

The school first opened as Southall County School in 1907,changing its name to Southall Grammar in 1945. In 1963 the school was renamed Southall Technical School, under which name it ran for 11 years, until it was named Villiers High School in 1974. As of 2009 the school has been extended by the addition of a sixth form.

Since 2004, the school has taken in a number of refugee students from around the world, some of them from war zones,[1] and has pupils from a variety of countries.[2] These students are often teamed up with a welcome prefect who helps them for two weeks, and are assessed by a teaching assistant; language education is tailored to each student's needs.[1]

In 2003, the school was one of three to receive £3000 from the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund for its work with refugee children.[3]

Technology

Villiers is a technology school, whose core subject at GCSE is Design and Technology. It has gained national attention with a number of technology-related projects.[4][5][6]

Academic achievement

In 2000, 45% of students got 5 or more GCSEs at grade A*-C; in 2004, the percentage remained at 45%[1] In 2009 the school recorded 51% of pupils with 5 or more GCSEs at grade A*-C, slightly above the national average.[citation needed]

Notable faculty

References

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