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Vincentian Academy-
Duquesne University
Mind, Heart, and Spirit
Address
McKnight and Peebles Roads
Pittsburgh (McCandless), Pennsylvania, (Allegheny County), 15237
 United States
Coordinates 40°33′25″N 80°01′14″W / 40.5569°N 80.0206°W / 40.5569; -80.0206Coordinates: 40°33′25″N 80°01′14″W / 40.5569°N 80.0206°W / 40.5569; -80.0206
Information
Type Private, Coeducational
Religious affiliation Roman Catholic;
Vincentian Sisters of Charity
Established 1932
CEEB Code 393940
President Sr. Mary Frances Grasinger[1]
Principal Sr. Camille Panich
Asst. Principal Victor Boerio
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 242[2] (2007)
Student:teacher ratio 14:1
Campus Suburban
Campus size 67 acres (270,000 m2)
Color(s) Royal Blue and Gold          
Mascot Lion
Team name Royals
Accreditation(s) Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools [3 ]
Affiliation Duquesne University
Admissions Director William Stringert
Athletic Director Jim Bockstoce
Website
VincentianAcademyDuquesneUniversity.JPG

Vincentian Academy-Duquesne University is a Roman Catholic college preparatory school near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. It is located in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Founded in 1932 as Vincentian High School, it began its affiliation with Duquesne University in 1995. The Academy comprises three buildings housed on a 67-acre (270,000 m2) campus in McCandless Township, a north suburb of Pittsburgh. There is an approximate 9:1 student-to-teacher ratio,[4] and the enrollment as of the 2006-2007 school year consisted of 60 freshmen, 49 sophomores, 59 juniors, and 74 seniors, a total of 242 students.[2]

Contents

Academics

Vincentian Academy maintains 100% university placement, with special consideration when applying to Duquesne University, as well as a 25% minimum scholarship if accepted.[2] Vincentian is one of twelve schools in Pennsylvania that offer the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program.

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The IB Program

At Vincentian Academy approximately 80% of all juniors and seniors take some IB courses. These courses include anything from IB Higher Level Biology to IB Standard Level Mathematics. Vincentian students also have spectacular education before entering the IB program in junior year. For example, the sophomores in US 20th Century History learn things such as how old Babe Ciarlo was when he died. He was 20.[2]


. Overall, 84% of all those students taking IB exams pass. Over the past eight years Vincentian IB diploma candidates have achieved an 82% pass rate which is higher than the world pass rate of 78% and significantly higher than the United States pass rate of approximately 75%.[5]


Vincentian is unique in that it is the only Catholic, university-affiliated, International Baccalaureate school in the world.[2]

Affiliation with Duquesne University

Early in the 1990s, Duquesne University president Dr. John E. Murray was investigating the possibility of a high school for Duquesne, disturbed by contemporary reports that American high schools were inferior to schools in Europe, Asia, and even third-world countries.[6] Reasoning that a university-affiliated school could be a model for the region and offer an advanced curriculum and integrate the resources of a major university into its operation, Murray explored the possibility as an extension of Duquesne's Spiritan tradition of often unconventional leadership.[6]

Dialogue with the Vincentian Sisters began in 1993; an agreement was finalized 1994, and the inaugurating class was set to enroll in 1995, with Dean Derek Whordley of the Duquesne University School of Education to be president of the new school. In September 1995, Vincentian Academy-Duquesne University became officially operational, and 31 new Academy students were assimilated into the high school classes.[6] A slow expansion was planned, with the new Academy gradually replacing the old Vincentian High School.

The International Baccalaureate program was selected as the new Academy's curriculum because of its international appeal and academic quality.[6] Moreover, it would be an attractive venue for university researchers and a unique experience for teachers. In adopting the IB, Vincentian Academy-Duquesne University became the only Catholic IB school in the world that was part of a major university.[6]

Alma Mater

The original school's alma mater dates from the founding of Vincentian High School, and so retains that wording.

Hail! All hail, our dear Vincentian High School
We greet thee, our Alma Mater dear
Safe are we e're guided by thy rule
Thy mandate we gratefully revere
In thy realm protection can be found
Virtue, science, learning prevail
May thy praise throughout all days be found
Noble Queen, thee we hail

The current alma mater, which was instituted in 2007, carries the same tune but to different words.

Oh, Vincentian! We hail our alma mater
Blue and gold, the colors we hold dear
Mind, heart, spirit, guided by our Father
Friendships formed will last throughout the years
Honesty, respect, and human kindness
Tempered with a pride in quality
Integrity, and faith in God define us
Oh, Vincentian! We hail thee

References

  1. ^ Chute, Eleanor (2008-08-01). "Vincentian Academy announces new president". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08214/901117-298.stm. Retrieved 2008-08-12.  
  2. ^ a b c d e "About Vincentian". Vincentian Academy website. http://www.vaduq.org/about/about-home.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-19.  
  3. ^ MSA-CSS. "MSA-Commission on Secondary Schools". http://www.css-msa.org/search.php?MODE=VIEW(PA452)&org=CSS. Retrieved 2009-05-23.  
  4. ^ "Quick facts". Vincentian Academy website. http://www.vaduq.org/. Retrieved 2007-01-19.  
  5. ^ "Welcome Letter From our president". Vincentian Academy website. http://www.vaduq.org/about/about-welcome.htm. Retrieved 2007-10-13.  
  6. ^ a b c d e Rusnak, Timothy G. (2006). "A brief history of Vincentian Academy". Vincentian Academy. http://www.vaduq.org/about/about-history.htm. Retrieved 2008-02-10.  

External links


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