Virago: Wikis

  
  

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Bronze of a young female warrior in Lombard costume. Francesco Porzio, Monumento alla difesa di Casale, 1897

Virago is a term that refers to a strong, brave, or warlike woman. The term comes from the same root as the word virile, the Latin vir "a man",[1] hence, a masculine woman.

A "virile" woman was perceived as a departure from the normative gender roles of English society, where even being a scold was punishable by law with cucking. Thus virago joined pejoratives such as termagant and shrew to demean women who acted aggressively. However, unlike the other terms, virago originally had, and retained, a positive aspect; for example, the British Royal Navy christened at least four warships Virago.

Contents

Vulgate Bible

Virago is the Vulgate Bible's word for "woman", and so was taken by Middle English speakers to be the name given by Adam to the first woman when she was created out of his rib.

The Vulgate reads:

Dixitque Adam hoc nunc os ex ossibus meis et caro de carne mea haec vocabitur virago quoniam de viro sumpta est.
"And Adam said: This now is bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man."

The Middle English poem Cursor Mundi retains the Latin name for the woman in its otherwise Middle English account of the creation:

Quen sco was broght be-for adam, Virago he gaf her to nam; þar for hight sco virago, ffor maked of the man was sco. (lines 631-34)
"When she was brought before Adam, Virago was the name he gave to her; Therefore she is called Virago, For she was made out of the man."

See also

References

  1. ^ "Virago". Merriam-Webster Online. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/virago. Retrieved 2009-10-06.  

Bibliography

  • Ernst Breisach, Caterina Sforza ; A Renaissance virago, Chicago [usw.]: University Press 1967
  • Elizabeth D. Carney,"Olympias and the Image of the Virago" in: Phoenix, Vol. 47, No. 1 (Spring, 1993), pp. 29-55
  • Morris, Richard. Cursor Mundi: A Northunbrian Poem of the XIV Century. London: Oxford UP, 1874. Republished 1961.
  • Yenna Wu, The Chinese virago : a literary theme, Cambridge, Mass. [u.a.] : Harvard Univ. Press, 1995

costume. Francesco Porzio, Monumento alla difesa di Casale, 1897]]

Virago is a term that refers to a strong, brave, or warlike woman. The term comes from the same root as the word virile, the Latin vir "a man",[1] hence, a masculine woman.

A "virile" woman was perceived as a departure from the normative gender roles of English society,[citation needed] where even being a scold was punishable by law with cucking.[citation needed] Thus virago joined pejoratives such as termagant and shrew to demean women who acted aggressively. However, unlike the other terms, virago originally had, and retained, a positive aspect; for example, the British Royal Navy christened at least four warships Virago.

Contents

Vulgate Bible

Virago is the Vulgate Bible's word for "woman"(nope only in Genesis) , and so was taken by Middle English speakers to be the name given by Adam to the first woman when she was created out of his rib.

The Vulgate reads:

Dixitque Adam hoc nunc os ex ossibus meis et caro de carne mea haec vocabitur virago quoniam de viro sumpta est.
"And Adam said: This now is bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man."

The Middle English poem Cursor Mundi retains the Latin name for the woman in its otherwise Middle English account of the creation:

Quen sco was broght be-for adam, Virago he gaf her to nam; þar for hight sco virago, ffor maked of the man was sco. (lines 631-34)
"When she was brought before Adam, Virago was the name he gave to her; Therefore she is called Virago, For she was made out of the man."

See also

References

  1. ^ "Virago". Merriam-Webster Online. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/virago. Retrieved 2009-10-06. 

Bibliography

  • Ernst Breisach, Caterina Sforza ; A Renaissance virago, Chicago [usw.]: University Press 1967
  • Elizabeth D. Carney,"Olympias and the Image of the Virago" in: Phoenix, Vol. 47, No. 1 (Spring, 1993), pp. 29-55
  • Morris, Richard. Cursor Mundi: A Northunbrian Poem of the XIV Century. London: Oxford UP, 1874. Republished 1961.
  • Yenna Wu, The Chinese virago : a literary theme, Cambridge, Mass. [u.a.] : Harvard Univ. Press, 1995







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