Virginia Woolf: Wikis

  
  
  

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Virginia Woolf

Born Adeline Virginia Stephen
25 January 1882(1882-01-25)
London, England
Died 28 March 1941 (aged 59)
near Lewes, East Sussex, England
Occupation Novelist, Essayist, Publisher, Critic
Notable work(s) To the Lighthouse, Mrs Dalloway, Orlando: A Biography, A Room of One's Own
Spouse(s) Leonard Woolf (1912–1941)
.Adeline Virginia Woolf (25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English novelist, essayist, diarist, epistler, publisher, feminist, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century.^ Virginia Woolf is best known to scholars today as a feminist writer.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Virginia Woolf was born Adeline Virginia Stephen, in 1882.
  • Search Results for Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.azete.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Filed under: Woolf, Virginia, 1882-1941 .

.During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a member of the Bloomsbury Group.^ From a well connected, literary family, Woolf became a significant figure of the London literati and a member of the Bloomsbury group, publishing her first novel The Voyage Out in her early thirties.

^ [MB 165] True, but some members of the Bloomsbury Group were vital contributors to the arts and literature and to economic theory.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Fortunately for the literary pilgrim, most of the London Woolf inhabited and drew on for her fiction has survived bombs and real estate developers.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929), with its famous dictum, "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction."

Contents

Early life

Julia Prinsep Stephen portrayed by Edward Burne-Jones, 1866
Virginia Woolf was born Adeline Virginia Stephen in London in 1882. Her mother, a famous beauty, Julia Prinsep Stephen (born Jackson) (1846–1895), was born in India to Dr. John and Maria Pattle Jackson and later moved to England with her mother, where she served as a model for Pre-Raphaelite painters such as Edward Burne-Jones.[1] .Her father, Sir Leslie Stephen, was a notable author, critic and mountaineer.^ February: Death of father, Leslie Stephen.

^ Plaques on various houses proclaim that Enid Bagnold, author of National Velvet , Robert Baden-Powell, chief of Boy Scouts, and at No.22, Sir Leslie Stephen were residents once upon a time.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Woolf also writes to a bibliographer of Leslie Stephen about her father's work (Box 2, folder 167).

[2] .The young Virginia was educated by her parents in their literate and well-connected household at 22 Hyde Park Gate, Kensington.^ Hyde Park Gate News : the Stephen family newspaper / Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell with Thoby Stephen ; edited with an introduction and notes by Gill Lowe.

^ From her autobiographical writings, collected in the posthumous Moments of Being , it is possible to reconstruct what went on at 22 Hyde Park Gate more than a century ago and to deduce that the 1880 scenes in her novel The Years were based on that household.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Turn right into Hyde Park Gate.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

Her parents had each been married previously and been widowed, and, consequently, the household contained the children of three marriages. Julia had three children from her first husband, Herbert Duckworth, George Duckworth, Stella Duckworth, and Gerald Duckworth. .Her father was married to Minny Thackeray, and they had one daughter: Laura Makepeace Stephen, who was declared mentally disabled and lived with the family until she was institutionalized in 1891.[3] Leslie and Julia had four children together: Vanessa Stephen (1879), Thoby Stephen (1880), Virginia (1882), and Adrian Stephen (1883).^ February: Death of father, Leslie Stephen.

^ No mention that on January 25, 1882 a daughter Virginia was born to Stephen and his wife Julia in that very tall house on the left hand side near the bottom which begins by being stucco and ends by being red brick...so rickety that it seems as if a very high wind would topple it over.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Hyde Park Gate News : the Stephen family newspaper / Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell with Thoby Stephen ; edited with an introduction and notes by Gill Lowe.

.Sir Leslie Stephen's eminence as an editor, critic, and biographer, and his connection to William Thackeray (he was the widower of Thackeray's youngest daughter), meant that his children were raised in an environment filled with the influences of Victorian literary society.^ In scenes evoked by the Stephen children's sale of the house and by Virginia's raised consciousness about Victorian inequities, Eleanor Pargiter in the 1913 chapter of The Years feels ashamed of the servant's quarters as she confers with a real estate broker.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ In 1904, following the death of Sir Leslie Stephen, the last lugubrious event at 22 Hyde Park Gate, his children left Kensington never to return.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Virginia's father, Sir Leslie Stephen, a distinguished man of letters belonged to "an aristocracy of intellect," many of whom chose to nest in Kensington.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

.Henry James, George Henry Lewes, Julia Margaret Cameron (an aunt of Julia Stephen), and James Russell Lowell, who was made Virginia's honorary godfather, were among the visitors to the house.^ Henry James and the criticism of Virginia Woolf.

^ This much is certain: George Duckworths abuse made Virginia feel victimized in ways that transcended the physical.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ At one point Martha reveals to Nick that George is the only man who has ever made her happy - so what happened?

Julia Stephen was equally well connected. .Descended from an attendant of Marie Antoinette, she came from a family of renowned beauties who left their mark on Victorian society as models for Pre-Raphaelite artists and early photographers.^ Much of Woolfs difficulty in relating to the opposite sex came from her early vulnerability when forced to conform to the ideas of her male family members.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Among her ancestors were lawyers, civil servants, writers and legendary Victorian beauties who inspired artists and married well.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

.Supplementing these influences was the immense library at the Stephens' house, from which Virginia and Vanessa (unlike their brothers, who were formally educated) were taught the classics and English literature.^ Hyde Park Gate News : the Stephen family newspaper / Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell with Thoby Stephen ; edited with an introduction and notes by Gill Lowe.

^ Virginia Woolf's Jacob's room : the holograph draft : based on the holograph manuscript in the Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature at the New York Public Library / transcribed and edited by Edward L. Bishop.

^ The correspondence begins in 1906 after Virginia's elder brother, Thoby Stephen, died of typhoid fever.

According to Woolf's memoirs, her most vivid childhood memories, however, were not of London but of St. Ives in Cornwall, where the family spent every summer until 1895. The Stephens' summer home, Talland House, looked out over Porthminster Bay, and is still standing today, though somewhat altered. .Memories of these family holidays and impressions of the landscape, especially the Godrevy Lighthouse, informed the fiction Woolf wrote in later years, most notably To the Lighthouse.^ Fortunately for the literary pilgrim, most of the London Woolf inhabited and drew on for her fiction has survived bombs and real estate developers.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Woolf's biographer Hermione Lee informs us that Talland House, the actual family home, has become a tourist attraction.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ In a memoir and in The Years Woolf wrote of: ...one of the pleasures of scrunching the shells with which now and then the Flower walk was strewn.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

.The sudden death of her mother in 1895, when Virginia was 13, and that of her half-sister Stella two years later, led to the first of Virginia's several nervous breakdowns.^ But behind the talented author and feminist was a woman who, for years, had suffered from numerous nervous breakdowns and periods of dark depression.

^ Nearly 60 years after Virginia Woolf's death, it has taken on the aspect of an industry.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Raised primarily by two maiden aunts after the death of her mother, Rachel is exceptionally nave about men.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

The death of her father in 1904 provoked her most alarming collapse and she was briefly institutionalised.[3]
.Her breakdowns and subsequent recurring depressive periods, modern scholars (including her nephew and biographer, Quentin Bell) have suggested,[4] were also influenced by the sexual abuse she and Vanessa were subjected to by their half-brothers George and Gerald Duckworth (which Woolf recalls in her autobiographical essays A Sketch of the Past and 22 Hyde Park Gate).^ Hyde Park Gate News : the Stephen family newspaper / Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell with Thoby Stephen ; edited with an introduction and notes by Gill Lowe.

^ From her autobiographical writings, collected in the posthumous Moments of Being , it is possible to reconstruct what went on at 22 Hyde Park Gate more than a century ago and to deduce that the 1880 scenes in her novel The Years were based on that household.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ But behind the talented author and feminist was a woman who, for years, had suffered from numerous nervous breakdowns and periods of dark depression.

Throughout her life, Woolf was plagued by periodic mood swings and associated illnesses. .Though this instability often affected her social life, her literary productivity continued with few breaks until her suicide.^ The inherent (and often productive) conflict between male and female has been distorted by the social ascendance of masculine authority.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

Bloomsbury

The Dreadnought Hoaxers in Abyssinian regalia; Virginia Woolf is the bearded figure on the far left
.After the death of their father and Virginia's second nervous breakdown, Vanessa and Adrian sold 22 Hyde Park Gate and bought a house at 46 Gordon Square in Bloomsbury.^ Location: 46 Gordon Square Bloomsbury, London .
  • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

^ From her autobiographical writings, collected in the posthumous Moments of Being , it is possible to reconstruct what went on at 22 Hyde Park Gate more than a century ago and to deduce that the 1880 scenes in her novel The Years were based on that household.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Hyde Park Gate News : the Stephen family newspaper / Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell with Thoby Stephen ; edited with an introduction and notes by Gill Lowe.

.Following studies at King's College London, Woolf came to know Lytton Strachey, Clive Bell, Rupert Brooke, Saxon Sydney-Turner, Duncan Grant, Leonard Woolf and Roger Fry, who together formed the nucleus of the intellectual circle of writers and artists known as the Bloomsbury Group.^ Roger Fry, a biography [by] Virginia Woolf.

^ Thoby started his "Thursday evenings" here with Lytton Strachey, Desmond MacCarthy, Saxon Sydney-Turner, and Clive Bell; John Maynard Keynes, Duncan Grant, and Roger Fry came in a second wave.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Virginia's brother, Thoby Stephen, attends Cambridge, where he meets members of the future Bloomsbury Group (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, Clive Bell).

.Several members of the group attained notoriety in 1910 with the Dreadnought hoax, which Virginia participated in disguised as a male Abyssinian royal.^ Virginia's brother, Thoby Stephen, attends Cambridge, where he meets members of the future Bloomsbury Group (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, Clive Bell).

Her complete 1940 talk on the Hoax was discovered and is published in the memoirs collected in the expanded edition of The Platform of Time (2008). .In 1907 Vanessa married Clive Bell, and the couple's interest in avant garde art would have an important influence on Virginia's development as an author.^ Hyde Park Gate News : the Stephen family newspaper / Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell with Thoby Stephen ; edited with an introduction and notes by Gill Lowe.

^ The following year, Vanessa married Clive Bell and they took over the lease of the house, later sharing it with Maynard Keynes.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Strachey, author of Eminent Victorians , nudged another Cambridge classmate Leonard Woolf into marrying Virginia Stephen.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

[5]
.Virginia Stephen married writer Leonard Woolf in 1912. Despite his low material status (Virginia referring to Leonard during their engagement as a "penniless Jew") the couple shared a close bond.^ Writer's diary: being extracts from the diary of Virginia Woolf, edited by Leonard Woolf.

^ Virginia Stephen to Leonard Woolf, spring 1912, as cited in Bell, Volume I, p.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen .
  • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

.Indeed, in 1937, Woolf wrote in her diary: "Love-making — after 25 years can’t bear to be separate ...^ Indeed, Woolf notes that George created the setting for his unsavory conduct when he paid for the renovations that put Vanessa and Virginia into separate bed-sitting rooms.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Moreover, it is generally regarded as a metaphorical portrayal of Vita Sackville-West, a woman with whom Woolf had love affair spanning many years.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Excerpts are identified as follows: The Letters of Virginia Woolf (L v.1); The Diary of Virginia Woolf (D v.1); Moments of Being (MB); A Room of One's Own (ROO); The Years (TY).
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

you see it is enormous pleasure being wanted: a wife. And our marriage so complete." .The two also collaborated professionally, in 1917 founding the Hogarth Press, which subsequently published Virginia's novels along with works by T.S. Eliot, Laurens van der Post, and others.^ During German air raids Virginia slept in the basement which became the press room after they founded their publishing venture, Hogarth Press in 1917.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ It resembles the home of Virginia and Leonard Woolf and their Hogarth Press at 52 Tavistock Square in Bloomsbury after 1924.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Waves : a record of the multimedia work devised by Katie Mitchell and the company from the text of Virginia Woolf's novel The waves.

[6] The Press also commissioned works by contemporary artists, including Dora Carrington and Vanessa Bell.
.The ethos of the Bloomsbury group discouraged sexual exclusivity, and in 1922, Virginia met the writer and gardener Vita Sackville-West, wife of Harold Nicolson.^ This kind of relation between the sexes, which Virginia was able to observe in the marriage of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicholson, is the least negative rendition of sexuality in her writings.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Although Virginia was evidently celibate during this time, sexuality was an important element in the interactions of the Bloomsbury circle.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Why are the intricacies and ambiguities that so fascinated her in Vita Sackville-West abandoned in favor of an initially absolute masculinity?
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

After a tentative start, they began a sexual relationship that lasted through most of the 1920s.[7] .In 1928, Woolf presented Sackville-West with Orlando, a fantastical biography in which the eponymous hero's life spans three centuries and both genders.^ Orlando; a biography, by Virginia Woolf.

^ Orlando and Shermaldine achieve, by fantastical means, a passionate relationship that is free of the gender-based difficulties of The Voyage Out .
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ But now begins the 19th century, an era where Orlando must cast off her male clothing and come to terms with both her femininity and her art.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

It has been called by Nigel Nicolson, Vita Sackville-West's son, "the longest and most charming love letter in literature."[7] After their affair ended, the two women remained friends until Woolf's death in 1941. Virginia Woolf also remained close to her surviving siblings, Adrian and Vanessa; Thoby had died of an illness at the age of 26.

Suicide

.After completing the manuscript of her last (posthumously published) novel, Between the Acts, Woolf fell victim to a depression similar to that which she had earlier experienced.^ Between the acts / Virginia Woolf.

^ She drew on the villagers for her last novel Between the Acts , written during recurrent depression and published after her death.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ February: Between the Acts is completed.

.The onset of World War II, the destruction of her London home during the Blitz, and the cool reception given to her biography of her late friend Roger Fry all worsened her condition until she was unable to work.^ Roger Fry, a biography [by] Virginia Woolf.

^ Between the Acts was written during the first years of World War II, in an environment where people far less apprehensive in general than Virginia Woolf were quite convinced that Western civilization might be destroyed by Fascism.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The outbreak of World War I, coming on the heels of one of Virginia's mental breakdowns, prompted the move out of London in October 1914.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

[8]
.On 28 March 1941, Woolf committed suicide.^ On the morning of March 28, 1941, she left the house and walked down to the River Ouse.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

.She put on her overcoat, filled its pockets with stones, then walked into the River Ouse near her home and drowned herself.^ He put his hand into his trouser pocket and brought out a handful of silver.
  • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

^ With a stone in the pocket of her fur coat, she waded in and drowned.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ On the morning of March 28, 1941, she left the house and walked down to the River Ouse.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

Woolf's skeletonised body was not found until 18 April.[9] .Her husband buried her cremated remains under an elm in the garden of Monk's House, their home in Rodmell, Sussex.^ "Monk's House will be perhaps the ugliest house in Sussex-not plain ugliness, either, but cultured ugliness, which is worse," Virginia wrote to Vanessa when they took possession.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Catalogue of books from the library of Leonard and Virginia Woolf : taken from Monks House, Rodmell, Sussex and 24 Victoria Square, London and now in the possession of Washington State University Pullman, U.S.A. .

^ TO EAST SUSSEX: MONK'S HOUSE AND CHARLESTON .
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

In her last note to her husband she wrote:
I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel we can't go through another of those terrible times. And I shan't recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can't concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don't think two people could have been happier 'til this terrible disease came. I can't fight any longer. .I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work.^ Snyder, Does Your Mother Know You're Out?
  • Browse By Author: W - Project Gutenberg 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

And you will I know. You see I can't even write this properly. I can't read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that — everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can't go on spoiling your life any longer. I don't think two people could have been happier than we have been. V.[10]

Work

.Woolf began writing professionally in 1900, initially for the Times Literary Supplement with a journalistic piece about Haworth, home of the Brontë family.^ Books and portraits : some further selections from the literary and biographical writings of Virginia Woolf / edited and with a pref.

^ The Voyage Out is clearly the product of a young intellect new to the art of novel-writing: however, an inexperienced Virginia Woolf is still a formidable literary voice.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

[11] .Her first novel, The Voyage Out, was published in 1915 by her half-brother's imprint, Gerald Duckworth and Company Ltd.^ From a well connected, literary family, Woolf became a significant figure of the London literati and a member of the Bloomsbury group, publishing her first novel The Voyage Out in her early thirties.

^ All references to the published or final version of The Voyage Out refer to the American edition, which was the last edition for which Woolf made substantive revisions.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The next novel I shall examine, another coming-of-age story published thirteen years after The Voyage Out , Orlando is a work that eliminates by fantastical means the great divide between male and female that is central to The Voyage Out .
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

.This novel was originally entitled Melymbrosia, but Woolf repeatedly changed the draft.^ To the lighthouse / Virginia Woolf ; the original holograph draft transcribed and edited by Susan Dick.

^ March: The Voyage Out (originally entitled Melymbrosia ) is published.

.An earlier version of The Voyage Out has been reconstructed by Woolf scholar Louise DeSalvo and is now available to the public under the intended title.^ Melymbrosia : an early version of The voyage out / edited, with an introduction by Louise A. DeSalvo.

^ Voyage out / Virginia Woolf.

^ Voyage out / by Virginia Woolf.

.DeSalvo argues that many of the changes Woolf made in the text were in response to changes in her own life.^ Orlandos is a mind that bridges this divide, her many and varied lovers a rebellion against the sex-based limitations Woolf perceived in her own society.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Many events of Woolfs life during the writing of the novel found expression therein.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

[12]
Lytton Strachey and Woolf at Garsington, 1923.[8]
.Woolf went on to publish novels and essays as a public intellectual to both critical and popular success.^ In 1937, Woolf had published her second book-length essay.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Pargiters : the novel-essay portion of The years / by Virginia Woolf ; edited, with an introd.

^ This series includes 36 letters written by Virginia Woolf about her novels and essays to editors, publishers, booksellers, private readers, and famous writers, such as Enid Bagnold, Katherine Mansfield, and Hugh Walpole.

.Much of her work was self-published through the Hogarth Press.^ During German air raids Virginia slept in the basement which became the press room after they founded their publishing venture, Hogarth Press in 1917.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

.She has been hailed as one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century and one of the foremost modernists.^ Considered one of the foremost literary figures of twentieth century, Woolf experimented with her writing, creating probing and modern narrative that used stream-of-consciousness writing, fractured narratives, and characters with psychological and emotional motives.

[13]
.Woolf is considered one of the greatest innovators in the English language.^ To paraphrase E.M. Forsters famous saying, Woolf uses the light of the English language to push against the darkness of her sexual apprehension.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

In her works she experimented with stream-of-consciousness and the underlying psychological as well as emotional motives of characters. .Woolf's reputation declined sharply after World War II, but her eminence was re-established with the surge of Feminist criticism in the 1970s.^ The last volume of Woolfs complete diary, edited by Anne Olivier Bell, was very helpful in understanding the extent to which World War II affected Woolfs perspective on males and masculinity.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Between the Acts is the product of international developments that affected every aspect of Woolfs life the rise of Fascism and the start of the World War II. In The Voyage Out , Woolfs protagonist literally dies of sexual apprehension the problem is insurmountable.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Between the Acts was written during the first years of World War II, in an environment where people far less apprehensive in general than Virginia Woolf were quite convinced that Western civilization might be destroyed by Fascism.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

[14]
.Her work was criticised for epitomizing the narrow world of the upper-middle class English intelligentsia.^ Virginia Woolf's nephew and biographer Quentin Bell places her family in the lower rung of the upper middle class, a construct with more resonance for English readers than Americans.
  • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Their villa is quite near a hotel, which provides Rachel with a microcosm of middle class English society in which she attempts to present herself as an adult.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

Some critics judged it to be lacking in universality and depth, without the power to communicate anything of emotional or ethical relevance to the disillusioned common reader, weary of the 1920s aesthetes. She was also criticized by some as an anti-semite, despite her being happily married to a Jewish man. This anti-semitism is drawn from the fact that she often wrote of Jewish characters in stereotypical archetypes and generalizations.[15] The overwhelming and rising 1920s and 30s anti-semitism had an unavoidable influence on Virginia Woolf. She wrote in her diary, "I do not like the Jewish voice; I do not like the Jewish laugh." However, in a 1930 letter to the composer, Ethel Smyth, quoted in Nigel Nicolson's biography,Virginia Woolf, she recollects her boasts of Leonard's Jewishness confirming her snobbish tendencies, "How I hated marrying a Jew- What a snob I was, for they have immense vitality."[16] In another letter to her dear friend Ethel Smyth, Virginia gives a scathing denunciation of Christianity, pointing to its self-righteous "egotism" and stating "my Jew has more religion in one toe nail--more human love, in one hair."[17] .Virginia and her husband Leonard Woolf actually hated and feared 1930s fascism with its anti-semitism knowing they were on Hitler's blacklist.^ Writer's diary: being extracts from the diary of Virginia Woolf, edited by Leonard Woolf.

^ Listen to Virginia Woolf's 1929 " Eulogy to words: Words don't live in dictionaries, they live in the mind " (BBC, 7'29'') - needs RealPlayer .
  • Virginia Woolf : Aeschylus translated brings despair 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.ellopos.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Captain's death bed and other essays / Virginia Woolf ; [edited and with a preface by Leonard Woolf].

.Her 1938 book Three Guineas was an indictment of fascism.^ Three Guineas explores the rise of Fascism and its relation to the male oppression of women, concluding that the seeds of the former are sown by the latter.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

[18]
.Virginia Woolf's peculiarities as a fiction writer have tended to obscure her central strength: Woolf is arguably the major lyrical novelist in the English language.^ Complete shorter fiction of Virginia Woolf ; edited by Susan Dick.

^ Lyrical novel; studies in Hermann Hesse, André Gide, and Virginia Woolf by Ralph Freedman.

^ Virginia Woolf, her art as a novelist, by Joan Bennett.

Her novels are highly experimental: a narrative, frequently uneventful and commonplace, is refracted—and sometimes almost dissolved—in the characters' receptive consciousness. Intense lyricism and stylistic virtuosity fuse to create a world overabundant with auditory and visual impressions.[18]
.The intensity of Virginia Woolf's poetic vision elevates the ordinary, sometimes banal settings - often wartime environments - of most of her novels.^ Virginia Woolf and the androgynous vision.

^ Novels of Virginia Woolf; fact and vision.

^ Imagery in Virginia Woolf's novels.

.For example, Mrs Dalloway (1925) centres on the efforts of Clarissa Dalloway, a middle-aged society woman, to organize a party, even as her life is paralleled with that of Septimus Warren Smith, a working-class veteran who has returned from the First World War bearing deep psychological scars.^ Between the Acts , like The Voyage Out , features a protagonist who parallels Woolf in age, sex and historical moment, and is thus an excellent example of the way in which her sexual fears had been transformed both by her personal experience as a professional woman in a patriarchal society and by recent historical developments, specifically the rise of Fascism and the beginning of the Second World War.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Mrs Dalloway -first pages Jan 24, 2009 .
  • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Mrs Dalloway's party; a short story sequence, edited with an introduction by Stella McNichol.

[19]
To the Lighthouse (1927) is set on two days ten years apart. The plot centers around the Ramsay family's anticipation of and reflection upon a visit to a lighthouse and the connected familial tensions. .One of the primary themes of the novel is the struggle in the creative process that beset painter Lily Briscoe while she struggles to paint in the midst of the family drama.^ In a tactic so uncharacteristic as to be revolutionary, Woolf opens her novel by revealing Isas adulterous desire for one of the familys neighbors: .
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

The novel is also a meditation upon the lives of a nation's inhabitants in the midst of war, and of the people left behind. It also explores the passage of time, and how women are forced by society to allow men to take emotional strength from them.[20]
.Orlando (1928) has a different quality from all Virginia Woolf's other novels suggested by its subtitle, "A Biography", as it attempts to represent the character of a real person and is dedicated to Vita Sackville-West.^ Moth and the star; a biography of Virginia Woolf.

^ Flush, a biography by Virginia Woolf.

^ Playing at biography, however, is not all that Woolf intended by the writing of this novel.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

It was meant to console Vita for being a girl and for the loss of her ancestral home, though it is also a satirical treatment of Vita and her work. In Orlando the techniques of historical biographers are being ridiculed; the character of a pompous biographer is being assumed in order for it to be mocked.[21]
The Waves (1931) presents a group of six friends whose reflections, which are closer to recitatives than to interior monologues proper, create a wave-like atmosphere that is more akin to a prose poem than to a plot-centered novel.[22]
.Her last work, Between the Acts (1941) sums up and magnifies Woolf's chief preoccupations: the transformation of life through art, sexual ambivalence, and meditation on the themes of flux of time and life, presented simultaneously as corrosion and rejuvenation—all set in a highly imaginative and symbolic narrative encompassing almost all of English history.^ Between the acts / Virginia Woolf.

^ If Orlando and A Room of Ones Own represent Woolfs attempt to imagine a being unfettered by the prerequisites of gender, then Between the Acts returns to reality to create a representative microcosm of the patriarchal society in which she lives.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Between the Acts is the product of international developments that affected every aspect of Woolfs life the rise of Fascism and the start of the World War II. In The Voyage Out , Woolfs protagonist literally dies of sexual apprehension the problem is insurmountable.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

This book is the most lyrical of all her works, not only in feeling but in style being chiefly written in verse.[23]
While nowhere near a simple recapitulation of the coterie's ideals, Woolf's work can be understood as consistently in dialogue with Bloomsbury, particularly its tendency (informed by G.E. Moore, among others) towards doctrinaire rationalism.[24]
Her works have been translated into over 50 languages, by writers of the calibre of Jorge Luis Borges and Marguerite Yourcenar.

Modern scholarship and interpretations

.Recently, studies of Virginia Woolf have focused on feminist and lesbian themes in her work, such as in the 1997 collection of critical essays, Virginia Woolf: Lesbian Readings, edited by Eileen Barrett and Patricia Cramer.^ Essays of Virginia Woolf / edited by Andrew McNeillie.

^ Henry James and the criticism of Virginia Woolf.

^ Moment, and other essays / Virginia Woolf.

.More controversially, Louise A. DeSalvo reads most of Woolf's life and career through the lens of the incestuous sexual abuse Woolf experienced as a young woman in her 1989 book Virginia Woolf: The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on her Life and Work.^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Melymbrosia / by Virginia Woolf ; edited with an introduction by Louise DeSalvo.

^ Virginia Woolf : the impact of childhood sexual abuse on her life and work / Louise DeSalvo.

.Woolf's fiction is also studied for its insight into shell shock, war, class, and modern British society.^ From this fictionalized study arose ideas about the problems inherent in the masculine/feminine paradigm that would culminate in Woolfs protofeminist polemic A Room of Ones Own .
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Between the Acts is also Woolfs first attempt to incorporate Freudian theories of sexuality into her fiction.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Lesbian panic : homoeroticism in modern British women's fiction / Patricia Juliana Smith.

.Her best-known nonfiction works, A Room of One's Own (1929) and Three Guineas (1938), examine the difficulties female writers and intellectuals face because men hold disproportionate legal and economic power, and the future of women in education and society.^ Room of one's own and Three guineas / by Virginia Woolf ; with an introduction by Hermione Lee.

^ Room of one's own / Virginia Woolf.

^ The fantasy world she creates in Orlando and translates into nonfiction theory in A Room of Ones Own offers viable solutions to the problem of female exploitation, but in Three Guineas she confronts the unlikelihood of Western society even approaching gender parity in her lifetime.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Irene Coates's book Who's Afraid of Leonard Woolf: A Case for the Sanity of Virginia Woolf takes the position that Leonard Woolf's treatment of his wife encouraged her ill health and ultimately was responsible for her death.^ Who killed Virginia Woolf?

^ Who's afraid of Leonard Woolf?

^ Virginia Woolf & Lytton Strachey : letters / edited by Leonard Woolf & James Strachey.

.The position, which is not accepted by Leonard's family, is extensively researched and fills in some of the gaps in the traditional account of Virginia Woolf's life.^ Hyde Park Gate News : the Stephen family newspaper / Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell with Thoby Stephen ; edited with an introduction and notes by Gill Lowe.

^ I will attempt to explain what sexual apprehension means in the context of Virginia Woolfs life and writings.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

.In contrast, Victoria Glendinning's book Leonard Woolf: A Biography, which is even more extensively researched and supported by contemporaneous writings, argues that Leonard Woolf was not only very supportive of his wife, but enabled her to live as long as she did by providing her with the life and atmosphere she needed to live and write.^ Vitas relationship with her husband involved long separations and was punctuated by homosexual liaisons on both sides; Virginia required Leonards constant emotional support to maintain her mental stability and disliked being separated from him even briefly.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Playing at biography, however, is not all that Woolf intended by the writing of this novel.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ But she did want to be married; she was twenty-seven years old, tired of spinsterhood, very tired of living with Adrian and very fond of Lytton.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

Accounts of Virginia's supposed anti-semitism (Leonard was a secular Jew) are not only taken out of historical context but greatly exaggerated. .Virginia's own diaries support this view of the Woolfs' marriage.^ In the course of writing The Voyage Out , Virginia Woolf had sorted out her own feelings regarding male/female sexual relations to the point where she felt ready to marry.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The Diary of Virginia Woolf , Volume V. ed.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The Diary of Virginia Woolf , Vol.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

[25]
.Though at least one biography of Virginia Woolf appeared in her lifetime, the first authoritative study of her life was published in 1972 by her nephew, Quentin Bell.^ Moth and the star; a biography of Virginia Woolf.

^ Flush, a biography by Virginia Woolf.

^ Flush : a biography / by Virginia Woolf.

In 1992, Thomas Caramagno published the book The Flight of the Mind: Virginia Woolf's Art and Manic-Depressive Illness."
.Hermione Lee's 1996 biography Virginia Woolf provides a thorough and authoritative examination of Woolf's life and work.^ This ultra-canonical work on Woolf seems to me most valuable when paired with a more recent, more topical examination of her life Virginia Woolf by Hermione Lee.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The issue of sexual apprehension exists at a fascinating intersection between Virginia Woolfs writings and her personal life.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

.In 2001 Louise DeSalvo and Mitchell A. Leaska edited The Letters of Vita Sackville-West and Virginia Woolf.^ Virginia Woolf & Lytton Strachey : letters / edited by Leonard Woolf & James Strachey.

^ Letters of Vita Sackville-West to Virginia Woolf / edited by Louise DeSalvo and Mitchell A. Leaska ; introduction by Mitchell A. Leaska.

^ Why are the intricacies and ambiguities that so fascinated her in Vita Sackville-West abandoned in favor of an initially absolute masculinity?
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Julia Briggs's Virginia Woolf: An Inner Life, published in 2005, is the most recent examination of Woolf's life.^ Virginia Woolf's women / Vanessa Curtis ; foreword by Julia Briggs.

^ Corrected by Virginia Woolf for the American edition (published 5 May 1927 by Harcourt, Brace, and Company).

^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

.It focuses on Woolf's writing, including her novels and her commentary on the creative process, to illuminate her life.^ Playing at biography, however, is not all that Woolf intended by the writing of this novel.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The issue of sexual apprehension exists at a fascinating intersection between Virginia Woolfs writings and her personal life.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I will attempt to explain what sexual apprehension means in the context of Virginia Woolfs life and writings.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

Thomas Szasz's book My Madness Saved Me: The Madness and Marriage of Virginia Woolf (ISBN 0-7658-0321-6) was published in 2006.
.Rita Martin’s play Flores no me pongan (2006) considers Woolf's last minutes of life in order to debate polemical issues such as bisexuality, Jewishness, and war.^ The issue of sexual apprehension exists at a fascinating intersection between Virginia Woolfs writings and her personal life.
  • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

Written in Spanish, the play was performed in Miami under the direction of actress Miriam Bermudez.

In films

  • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was an American play (1962) by Edward Albee and film (1966) directed by Mike Nichols (screenplay by Ernest Lehman adapted from the play). .Virginia Woolf does not appear as a character.^ Like most of her female characters, Virginia Woolf longed to be free of both overt masculine authority and the insidious mind-control of feminine socialization.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .According to the playwright, the title of the play — which is about a dysfunctional university married couple — refers to an academic joke about "who's afraid of living life without false illusions".
  • Virginia Woolf is a character in the film The Hours (2002).^ Who's afraid of Leonard Woolf?

    ^ Who killed Virginia Woolf?

    ^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    She is portrayed by Nicole Kidman.

Bibliography

Novels

Short story collections

"Biographies"

Virginia Woolf published three books to which she gave the subtitle "A Biography":
  • Orlando: A Biography (1928, usually characterised Novel, inspired by the life of Vita Sackville-West)
  • Flush: A Biography (1933, more explicitly cross-genre: fiction as "stream of consciousness" tale by Flush, a dog; non-fiction in the sense of telling the story of the owner of the dog, Elizabeth Barrett Browning)
  • Roger Fry: A Biography (1940, usually characterised non-fiction, however: "[Woolf's] novelistic skills worked against her talent as a biographer, for her impressionistic observations jostled uncomfortably with the simultaneous need to marshall a multitude of facts."[26])

Non-fiction books

  • Modern Fiction (1919)
  • The Common Reader (1925)
  • A Room of One's Own (1929)
  • On Being Ill (1930)
  • The London Scene (1931)
  • The Common Reader: Second Series (1932)
  • Three Guineas (1938)
  • The Death of the Moth and Other Essays (1942)
  • The Moment and Other Essays (1947)
  • The Captain's Death Bed And Other Essays (1950)
  • Granite and Rainbow (1958)
  • Books and Portraits (1978)
  • Women And Writing (1979)
  • Collected Essays (four volumes)

Drama

  • Freshwater: A Comedy (performed in 1923, revised in 1935, and published in 1976)

Autobiographical writings and diaries

  • A Writer’s Diary (1953) - Extracts from the complete diary
  • Moments of Being (1976)
  • A Moment's Liberty: the shorter diary (1990)
  • The Diary of Virginia Woolf (five volumes) - Diary of Virginia Woolf from 1915 to 1941
  • Passionate Apprentice: The Early Journals, 1897-1909 (1990)
  • Travels With Virginia Woolf (1993) - Greek travel diary of Virginia Woolf, edited by Jan Morris
  • The Platform of Time: Memoirs of Family and Friends, Expanded Edition, edited by S. P. Rosenbaum (London, Hesperus, 2008)

Letters

  • Congenial Spirits: The Selected Letters (1993)
  • The Letters of Virginia Woolf 1888-1941 (six volumes, 1975–1980)
  • Paper Darts: The Illustrated Letters of Virginia Woolf (1991)

Prefaces, contributions

  • Selections Autobiographical and Imaginative from the Works of George Gissing ed. Alfred C. Gissing, with an introduction by Virginia Woolf (London & New York, 1929)

Biographies

  • Virginia Woolf by Nigel Nicolson. New York, Penguin Group. .2000
  • Virginia Woolf: A Biography by Quentin Bell.^ Anyone who has read Quentin Bells biography of Woolf will immediately recognize her reflection in Rachel Vinrace.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Despite the staggering amount of biographical material available on Woolf, Quentin Bells Virginia Woolf remains essential to any meaningful examination of her life.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia Stephen to Leonard Woolf, spring 1912, as cited in Bell, Volume I, p.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .New York, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972; Revised editions 1990, 1996
  • "Vanessa and Virginia" by Susan Sellers (Two Ravens, 2008; Harcourt 2009) [Fictional biography of Woolf and her sister Vanessa Bell]
  • The Unknown Virginia Woolf by Roger Poole.^ New York: Harcourt Brace, 1928.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace, 1972.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ New York: Harcourt Brace, 1929.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Cambridge UP, 1978.
  • The Invisible Presence: Virginia Woolf and the Mother-Daughter Relationship by Ellen Bayuk Rosenman.^ Sign Up Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen is on Facebook Sign up for Facebook to connect with Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia Woolfs relationship with Vita Sackville-West was in many ways a case of opposites attracting.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia's brother, Thoby Stephen, attends Cambridge, where he meets members of the future Bloomsbury Group (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, Clive Bell).

    Louisiana State University Press, 1986.
  • Virginia Woolf and the politics of style, by Pamela J. Transue. .SUNY Press, 1986. ISBN 0887062865.
  • The Victorian heritage of Virginia Woolf: the external world in her novels, by Janis M. Paul.^ The Voyage Out is clearly the product of a young intellect new to the art of novel-writing: however, an inexperienced Virginia Woolf is still a formidable literary voice.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Before she became Virginia Woolf, Virginia Stephen spent many years preparing to venture into the realm of the novel.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia Woolfs First Voyage: A Novel in the Making .
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Pilgrim Books, 1987. ISBN 0937664731.
  • Virginia Woolf's To the lighthouse, by Harold Bloom.^ Woolf, Virginia, 1882-1941 To the lighthouse.

    ^ Essay about three books by Virginia Woolf: The Common Reader , Mrs. Dalloway , and Jacob's Room .

    ^ Note-Book of Anton Chekhov (English) (as Translator) Woolf, Virginia, 1882-1941 .
    • Browse By Author: W - Project Gutenberg 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Chelsea House, 1988. ISBN 1555460348.
  • Virginia Woolf: the frames of art and life, by C. Ruth Miller.^ The only original work in this series is the 1923 framed photograph of Virginia Woolf at Garsington (box 7, folder 204).

    Macmillan, 1988. ISBN 0333448804.
  • Virginia Woolf: The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Her Life and Work by Louise DeSalvo. Boston: Little Brown, 1989
  • A Virginia Woolf Chronology by Edward Bishop. .Boston: G.K. Hall & Co., 1989.
  • A Very Close Conspiracy: Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf by Jane Dunn.^ Indeed, Woolf notes that George created the setting for his unsavory conduct when he paid for the renovations that put Vanessa and Virginia into separate bed-sitting rooms.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia's brother, Thoby Stephen, attends Cambridge, where he meets members of the future Bloomsbury Group (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, Clive Bell).

    ^ Virginia Stephen to Leonard Woolf, spring 1912, as cited in Bell, Volume I, p.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Boston: Little, Brown, 1990
  • Virginia Woolf: A Writer's Life by Lyndall Gordon.^ The issue of sexual apprehension exists at a fascinating intersection between Virginia Woolfs writings and her personal life.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia Woolf is best known to scholars today as a feminist writer.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I will attempt to explain what sexual apprehension means in the context of Virginia Woolfs life and writings.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Norton, 1984; 1991.
  • Virginia Woolf and war, by Mark Hussey.^ The Voyage Out is clearly the product of a young intellect new to the art of novel-writing: however, an inexperienced Virginia Woolf is still a formidable literary voice.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Syracuse University Press, 1991. ISBN 0815625375.
  • The Flight of the Mind: Virginia Woolf's Art and Manic-Depressive Illness by Thomas D. Caramago.^ Like most of her female characters, Virginia Woolf longed to be free of both overt masculine authority and the insidious mind-control of feminine socialization.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Voyage Out is clearly the product of a young intellect new to the art of novel-writing: however, an inexperienced Virginia Woolf is still a formidable literary voice.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Berkeley: U of California Press, 1992
  • Virginia Woolf by James King.^ The correspondence is accompanied by an autograph manuscript preface by James Strachey for the 1956 Hogarth Press edition of Letters: Virginia Woolf & Lytton Strachey (Box 1, folder 2).

    ^ Preface to Virginia Woolf & Lytton Strachey Letters: holograph by James Strachey, .

    .NY: W.W. Norton, 1994.
  • Art and Affection: A Life of Virginia Woolf by Panthea Reid.^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The issue of sexual apprehension exists at a fascinating intersection between Virginia Woolfs writings and her personal life.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I will attempt to explain what sexual apprehension means in the context of Virginia Woolfs life and writings.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Oxford UP, 1996.
  • Virginia Woolf by Hermione Lee.^ Sign Up Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen is on Facebook Sign up for Facebook to connect with Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Woolf biographer Hermione Lee points out in her most recent book that the actual facts of Georges abuse may be less important than reality as his victim perceived it: Virginia Woolf herself thought that what had been done to her was very damaging.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hermione Lee does describe Leonard Woolfs attitude towards sexual relations in a manner that suggests Terence Hewet: his youthful attitude towards women was very confused.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Knopf, 1997.
  • Granite and Rainbow: The Hidden Life of Virginia Woolf by Mitchell Leaska.^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The issue of sexual apprehension exists at a fascinating intersection between Virginia Woolfs writings and her personal life.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I will attempt to explain what sexual apprehension means in the context of Virginia Woolfs life and writings.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998.
  • The Feminist Aesthetics of Virginia Woolf, by Jane Goldman.^ Virginia Woolf is best known to scholars today as a feminist writer.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Feminist Destinations and Further Essays on Virginia Woolf .
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia Woolf New Uniform Edition .

    .Cambridge University Press, 2001. ISBN 0521794587.
  • Virginia Woolf and the nineteenth-century domestic novel, by Emily Blair.^ The correspondence is accompanied by an autograph manuscript preface by James Strachey for the 1956 Hogarth Press edition of Letters: Virginia Woolf & Lytton Strachey (Box 1, folder 2).

    ^ Before she became Virginia Woolf, Virginia Stephen spent many years preparing to venture into the realm of the novel.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia's brother, Thoby Stephen, attends Cambridge, where he meets members of the future Bloomsbury Group (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, Clive Bell).

    .SUNY Press, 2002. ISBN 0791471195.
  • Virginia Woolf: becoming a writer, by Katherine Dalsimer.^ Virginia Woolf is best known to scholars today as a feminist writer.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Yale University Press, 2002. ISBN 0300092083.
  • Virginia Woolf: The Will to Create as a Woman by Ruth Gruber.^ Indeed, Woolf notes that George created the setting for his unsavory conduct when he paid for the renovations that put Vanessa and Virginia into separate bed-sitting rooms.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2005
  • My Madness Saved Me: The Madness and Marriage of Virginia Woolf by Thomas Szasz, 2006
  • Virginia Woolf: An Inner Life, by Julia Briggs.^ Corrected by Virginia Woolf for the American edition (published 5 May 1927 by Harcourt, Brace, and Company).

    ^ Virginia Woolfs struggle with sexual apprehension had an enormous effect on her life and work.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The issue of sexual apprehension exists at a fascinating intersection between Virginia Woolfs writings and her personal life.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Harcourt, 2006. ISBN 0156032295.
  • The Bedside, Bathtub and Armchair Companion to Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury by Sarah M. Hall, Continuum Publishing, 2007
  • Virginia Woolf and the Visible World, by Emily Dalgarno.^ Corrected by Virginia Woolf for the American edition (published 5 May 1927 by Harcourt, Brace, and Company).

    ^ Virginia Woolf , Bloomsbury Iconography B52.

    ^ Corrected by Virginia Woolf for the American edition (published 14 May 1925, by Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc.

    Cambridge University Press, 2007. ISBN 0521033608,.
  • A Life of One's Own: A Guide to Better Living through the Work and Wisdom of Virginia Woolf by Ilana Simons, New York: Penguin Press, 2007

Related works and cultural references

.
  • American composer Dominick Argento (b.1927) received the Pulitzer Prize in Music (1975) for his song cycle, "From the Diary of Virginia Woolf", which was premiered by Dame Janet Baker, mezzo soprano, and Martin Issep, pianist, at Orchestra Hall, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
  • Michael Cunningham's 1998 Pulitzer Prize winning novel, The Hours, focused on three generations of women affected by Woolf's novel Mrs Dalloway.^ Corrected by Virginia Woolf for the American edition (published 5 May 1927 by Harcourt, Brace, and Company).

    ^ Corrected by Virginia Woolf for the American edition (published 2 Oct 1928 by Crosby Gaige in a limited edition; 18 Oct 1928 by Harcourt, Brace, and Company in a trade edition).

    ^ Corrected by Virginia Woolf for the American edition (published 14 May 1925, by Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc.

    In 2002, a film version of the novel was released starring Nicole Kidman as Woolf, a role for which she won the 2002 Academy Award for Best Actress. The film also starred Julianne Moore and Meryl Streep.
  • Edward Albee's play, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, premiered in 1963 and was later adapted into a film version in 1966. The play/film utilizes Woolf's name as a musical punch-line for a joke that replaces "the big bad wolf" in the song "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?" with "Virginia Woolf". The play and film have nothing to do with the author or her life, though Albee asked Leonard Woolf's permission to use his late wife's name, and was granted it.

Notes

  1. ^ Smith College libraries biography of Julia Prinsep Stephen
  2. ^ Alan Bell, ‘Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832–1904)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006
  3. ^ a b Robert Meyer, 1998, Case Studies in Abnormal Behaviour, Allyn and Bacon
  4. ^ Bell 1996: 44
  5. ^ Briggs, Virginia Woolf (2005), 69-70
  6. ^ Claire Messud (10 December 2006). "The Husband". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/10/books/review/Messud.t.html?_r=1&n=Top%2fFeatures%2fBooks%2fBook%20Reviews&oref=slogin. Retrieved 2008-08-10. 
  7. ^ a b "Matt & Andrej Koymasky - Famous GLTB - Virginia Woolf". Andrejkoymasky.com. http://andrejkoymasky.com/liv/fam/biow3/wool2.html. Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  8. ^ a b Lee, Hermione: "Virginia Woolf." Knopf, 1997.
  9. ^ Panken, Shirley (1987). ""Oh that our human pain could here have ending" — Between the Acts". Virginia Woolf and the "Lust of Creation": a Psychoanalytic Exploration. SUNY Press. pp. 260–262. ISBN 9780887062001. http://books.google.com/books?id=de4UyeBbCIwC&pg=PA260. Retrieved 13 August 2009. 
  10. ^ Rose, Phyllis (1986). Woman of Letters: A Life of Virginia Woolf. Routledge. pp. 243. ISBN 0863580661. http://books.google.com/books?id=Nco9AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA243&dq=%22I+don%27t+think+two+people+could+have+been+happier+than+we+have+been.%22&sig=ACfU3U1_LUxP8T1rxk5kPkwqS9qeGHDtSA#PPA243,M1. Retrieved 2008-09-24. 
  11. ^ "Virginia Woolf". http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/vwoolf.htm. Retrieved 2007-10-05. 
  12. ^ Haule, J. (1982). Melymbrosia: An Early Version of "The Voyage out". Contemporary Literature, 23, 100-104.
  13. ^ "Critical Essays on Virginia Woolf", Morris Beja, 1985, Introduction, p.1
  14. ^ "Critical Essays on Virginia Woolf", Morris Beja, 1985, Introduction, p.1,3,53.
  15. ^ "Tales of abjection and miscegenation: Virginia Woolf's and Leonard Woolf's Jewish stories" Twentieth Century Literature, Fall, 2003 by Leena Kore Schroder, http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0403/is_3_49/ai_n6130106/pg_17/
  16. ^ ""Mr. Virginia Woolf"". Commentarymagazine.com. http://www.commentarymagazine.com/cm/main/viewArticle.aip?id=10801&page=2. Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  17. ^ "The Letters of Virginia Woolf" Volume Five 1932-1935, Nigel Nicolson & Joanne Trautmann, 1979, p. 321.
  18. ^ a b "The Hours" DVD, "Special Features", "The Mind and Times of Virginia Woolf", 2003.
  19. ^ "Critical Essays on Virginia Woolf", Morris Beja, 1985, p.13,53.
  20. ^ "Critical Essays on Virginia Woolf", Morris Beja, 1985, p.15-17.
  21. ^ "The Novels of Virginia Woolf", Hermione Lee, 1977, pp.138-157.
  22. ^ "Critical Essays on Virginia Woolf", Morris Beja, 1985, p.19.
  23. ^ "Critical Essays on Virginia Woolf", Morris Beja, 1985, p.24.
  24. ^ "From Clapham to Bloomsbury: a genealogy of morals", Professor Gertrude Himmelfarb, 2001. http://www.facingthechallenge.org/himmelfarb.php
  25. ^ ""Mr. Virginia Woolf"". Commentarymagazine.com. http://www.commentarymagazine.com/cm/main/viewArticle.aip?id=10801. Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  26. ^ Frances Spalding (ed.), Virginia Woolf: Paper Darts: the Illustrated Letters, Collins & Brown, 1991, (ISBN 1-85585-046-X) (hb) & (ISBN 1-85585-103-2) (pb), pp. 139-140

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

The beauty of the world which is so soon to perish, has two edges, one of laughter, one of anguish, cutting the heart asunder.
.Virginia Woolf (1882-01-251941-03-28), born Adeline Virginia Stephen, was a British writer who is considered to be one of the foremost modernist/feminist literary figures of the twentieth century.^ Who's ever heard Virginia Woolf?
  • Who's ever heard Virginia Woolf? 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.canada.com [Source type: General]

^ Virginia Stephen (1882-1941) grew up in a literary household.
  • University of Delaware: VIRGINIA WOOLF TURNING THE CENTURIES 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.lib.udel.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Virginia Woolf (1882 - 1941) was an English author, a feminist, critic, and an influential publisher.
  • Amazon.com: Guide to Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

See also : Orlando: A Biography

Contents

Sourced

  • Dearest,
    .I want to tell you that you have given me complete happiness.^ You have given me the greatest possible happiness.
    • Virginia Woolf - Suicide 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.malcolmingram.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Virginia Woolf - Biography And Visits 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.infobritain.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ Dearest, I want to tell you that you have given me complete happiness.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You have given me the greatest possible happiness .
    • Virginia Woolf@Everything2.com 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

    .No one could have done more than you have done.^ No one could have been received with greater acclamation than he was.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ More than one Virginia Woolf?
    • Virginia Woolf Message Board 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC mb.sparknotes.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ She could write no more.
    • "Professions for Women" by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC s.spachman.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

    Please believe that.
    .But I know that I shall never get over this: and I am wasting your life.^ But I know that I shall never get over this: and I am wasting your life.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I know that I am spoiling your life that without me you could work.
    • Virginia Woolf - Biography And Visits 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.infobritain.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work.
    • Virginia Woolf@Everything2.com 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Virginia Woolf - Suicide 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.malcolmingram.com [Source type: Original source]

    It is this madness. .Nothing anyone says can persuade me.^ Nothing anyone says can persuade me.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .You can work, and you will be much better without me.^ You can work, and you will be much better without me.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is so singular (or, perhaps better, so much a part of a moment) that using it to think about the work other novels do is innappropriate.
    • virginia woolf « Tags « ReadySteadyBlog « ReadySteadyBook - a literary site 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.readysteadybook.com [Source type: General]

    ^ I know that I am spoiling your life that without me you could work.
    • Virginia Woolf - Biography And Visits 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.infobritain.co.uk [Source type: General]

    .You see I can't write this even, which shows I am right.^ You see I can't even write this properly.
    • Virginia Woolf - Suicide 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.malcolmingram.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Virginia Woolf - Biography And Visits 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.infobritain.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ You see I can't write this even, which shows I am right.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But so engrossed was I with the problem you have laid upon my shoulders that I could not see even these usual sights without referring them to one centre.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .All I want to say is that until this disease came on we were perfectly happy.^ All I want to say is that until this disease came on we were perfectly happy.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What I want to say is that I owe all the happiness of my life to you.
    • Virginia Woolf - Biography And Visits 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.infobritain.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you.

    It was all due to you. .No one could have been so good as you have been, from the very first day till now.^ She had a perpetual sense as she watched the taxicabs, of being out, out, far out to sea and alone; she always had the feeling that it was very, very dangerous to live even one day."

    ^ It was thus that I became a journalist; and my effort was rewarded on the first day of the following month--a very glorious day it was for me--by a letter from an editor containing a cheque for one pound ten shillings and sixpence.
    • "Professions for Women" by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC s.spachman.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia was cruelly honest about her lack of physical attraction towards Leonard - when you kissed me the other day I feel no more than a rock.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Everyone knows that.
    V.
    .
    • Letter to Leonard Woolf (28 March 1941), from The Virginia Woolf Reader, ed.^ Woolf Virginia, 1882-1941.
      • University of Delaware: VIRGINIA WOOLF TURNING THE CENTURIES 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.lib.udel.edu [Source type: Academic]

      ^ Second common reader / by Virginia Woolf.

      ^ Letter to a young poet [by] Virginia Woolf.

      .Mitchell A. Leaska (Harcourt Trade, 1984, ISBN 0156935902), p.^ Mitchell A. Leaska (Harcourt Trade, 1984, ISBN 0156935902 ), p.
      • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      369

Jacob's Room (1922)

.
  • The strange thing about life is that though the nature of it must have been apparent to every one for hundreds of years, no one has left any adequate account of it.^ I now record the one act for which I take some credit to myself, though the credit rightly belongs to some excellent ancestors of mine who left me a certain sum of money--shall we say five hundred pounds a year?--so that it was not necessary for me to depend solely on charm for my living.
    • "Professions for Women" by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC s.spachman.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Anyhow this records the odd hurried unexpected way in which these things suddenly create themselves – one thing on top of another in about an hour.
    • The Cambridge Introduction to Virginia Woolf - Cambridge University Press 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.cambridge.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Though published seventy years ago, Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own holds no less appeal today than it did then.
    • Search Results for Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.azete.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .The streets of London have their map; but our passions are uncharted.^ The streets of London have their map; but our passions are uncharted.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .What are you going to meet if you turn this corner?^ What are you going to meet if you turn this corner?
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Turn left when you meet Kensington Road and continue a short distance until you reach a left hand turning into Hyde Park Gate.
    • Virginia Woolf - Biography And Visits 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.infobritain.co.uk [Source type: General]

    • Chapter 8

The Common Reader (1925)

.
  • But can we go to posterity with a sheaf of loose pages, or ask the readers of those days, with the whole of literature before them, to sift our enormous rubbish heaps for our tiny pearls?^ But can we go to posterity with a sheaf of loose pages, or ask the readers of those days, with the whole of literature before them, to sift our enormous rubbish heaps for our tiny pearls?
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Such are the questions which the critics might lawfully put to their companions at table, the novelists and poets.^ Such are the questions which the critics might lawfully put to their companions at table, the novelists and poets.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "How It Strikes a Contemporary"
  • Life is not a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged; life is a luminous halo, a semi-transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of consciousness to the end.^ One passage frequently studied occurs in "Modern Fiction" in the First Series: "Life is not a series of … big lamps symmetrically arranged; but a luminous halo, a semitransparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of consciousness to the end.
    • Virginia Stephen Woolf – FREE Virginia Stephen Woolf information | Encyclopedia.com: Find Virginia Stephen Woolf research 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "How It Strikes a Contemporary" Life is not a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged; life is a luminous halo, a semi-transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of consciousness to the end.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Since the novel begins and ends in Mrs. Dalloway's home in Westminster, let us start in front of the underground station at Parliament Square.
    • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

    .
    • "Modern Fiction"
  • Theirs, too, is the word-coining genius, as if thought plunged into a sea of words and came up dripping.^ "Modern Fiction" Theirs, too, is the word-coining genius, as if thought plunged into a sea of words and came up dripping.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ After an excursion up the Amazon, Rachel contracts a terrible illness that plunges her into delirium and then death.
    • Virginia Woolf Biography - Biography.com 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.biography.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ They are not thoughts directly praising oneself; that is the beauty of them; they are thoughts like this: "And then I came into the room.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Notes on an Elizabethan Play"
  • But delightful though it is to indulge in righteous indignation, it is misplaced if we agree with the lady's-maid that high birth is a form of congenital insanity, that the sufferer merely inherits the diseases of his ancestors, and endures them, for the most part very stoically, in one of those comfortably padded lunatic asylums which are known, euphemistically, as the stately homes of England.^ Does it help to explain some of those psychological puzzles that one notes in the margin of daily life?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of the part that is remembered, the most had better not be told: it would interest no one, or at least would not contribute to the story of what we ourselves have been.
    • Virginia Woolf - Books - Page 2 - City-Data Forum 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.city-data.com [Source type: General]

    ^ (At best, one could imagine this as a script for a play, and one is perhaps encouraged to do so by the simple repetitions of "Susan said", "Jinny said", "Louis said", etc., but the play would be very stiff.
    • virginia woolf « Tags « ReadySteadyBlog « ReadySteadyBook - a literary site 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.readysteadybook.com [Source type: General]

    • "Outlines: Lady Dorothy Nevill"

Mrs. Dalloway (1925)

  • Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself.
  • It was enemies one wanted, not friends.
  • What she loved was this, here, now, in front of her; the fat lady in the cab. .Did it matter then, she asked herself, walking towards Bond Street, did it matter that she must inevitably cease completely; all this must go on without her; did she resent it; or did it not become consoling to believe that death ended absolutely?^ Did it matter then, she asked herself, walking towards Bond Street, did it matter that she must inevitably cease completely; all this must go on without her; did she resent it; or did it not become consoling to believe that death ended absolutely?
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She muddled Armenians and Turks; loved success; hated discomfort; must be liked; talked oceans of nonsense: and to this day, ask her what the Equator was, and she did not know.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ 'All ends in death,' Orlando would say, sitting upright on the ice.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    but that somehow in the streets of .London, on the ebb and flow of things, here there, she survived.^ London, on the ebb and flow of things, here there, she survived.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mrs Dalloway hoped that she would would survive "somehow in the streets of London, on the ebb and flow of things."
    • Virginia Woolf - Biography And Visits 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.infobritain.co.uk [Source type: General]

    .Peter survived, lived in each other, she being part, she was positive, of the trees at home; of the house there, ugly, rambling all to bits and pieces as it was; part of people she had never met; being laid out like a mist between the people she knew best, who lifted her on their branches as she had seen the trees lift the mist, but it spread ever so far, her life, herself.
  • But to go deeper, beneath what people said (and these judgements, how superficial, how fragmentary they are!^ But to go deeper, beneath what people said (and these judgements, how superficial, how fragmentary they are!
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It's like being in the living room of a dysfunctional family's home!

    ^ PARMENIDES: Being is all there is .
    • Virginia Woolf : Aeschylus translated brings despair 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.ellopos.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ) in her own mind now, what did it mean to her, this thing she called life? .Oh, it was very queer.^ Oh, it was very queer.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Here was So-and-so in South Kensington; some one up in Bayswater; and somebody else, say, in Mayfair.^ So I made up Jacob's Room looking at the fire at Hogarth House; so I made up The Lighthouse one afternoon in the square here.
    • The Cambridge Introduction to Virginia Woolf - Cambridge University Press 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.cambridge.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ From the underground station, bear right and follow Kensington High Street as it becomes Kensington Road on the south end of one of London's five royal parks, Kensington Gardens.
    • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

    ^ I might get up, but if I got up and looked at it, ten to one I shouldn't be able to say for certain; because once a thing's done, no one ever knows how it happened.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And she felt quiet continuously a sense of their existence and she felt what a waste; and she felt what a pity; and she felt if only they could be brought together; so she did it.^ And she felt quiet continuously a sense of their existence and she felt what a waste; and she felt what a pity; and she felt if only they could be brought together; so she did it.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This could have been so much better had the George and Martha couple been less about moments and more about the years they've spent together.
    • Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf - Publick Theatre Boston - BCA Plaza Theatre - ArtsBoston.org 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.artsboston.org [Source type: General]

    ^ But she lives; for great poets do not die; they are continuing presences; they need only the opportunity to walk among us in the flesh.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And it was an offering; to combine, to create; but to whom?^ And it was an offering; to combine, to create; but to whom?
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .An offering for the sake of offering, perhaps.^ An offering for the sake of offering, perhaps.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Anyhow, it was her gift. .Nothing else had she of the slightest importance; could not think, write, even play the piano.^ Nothing else had she of the slightest importance; could not think, write, even play the piano.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Not that one could entirely blame Mrs. Woolf for her lack of dialectical rigor, for, as she writes, “The daughters of educated men have always done their thinking from hand to mouth.
    • The Rage of Virginia Woolf by Theodore Dalrymple, City Journal Summer 2002 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.city-journal.org [Source type: Original source]

    .She muddled Armenians and Turks; loved success; hated discomfort; must be liked; talked oceans of nonsense: and to this day, ask her what the Equator was, and she did not know.^ She muddled Armenians and Turks; loved success; hated discomfort; must be liked; talked oceans of nonsense: and to this day, ask her what the Equator was, and she did not know.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Did you know that you can help us produce ebooks by proof-reading just one page a day?
    • Browse By Author: W - Project Gutenberg 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia had a complex love/hate relationship with her father, and both father and daughter recognized that she was very like him in her temperament .
    • Virginia Woolf@Everything2.com 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

    .All the same, that one day should follow another; Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday; that one should wake up in the morning; see the sky; walk in the park; meet Hugh Whitbread; then suddenly in came Peter; then these roses; it was enough.^ One of these days, he said to himself .
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the same, that one day should follow another; Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday; that one should wake up in the morning; see the sky; walk in the park; meet Hugh Whitbread; then suddenly in came Peter; then these roses; it was enough.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Anyhow this records the odd hurried unexpected way in which these things suddenly create themselves – one thing on top of another in about an hour.
    • The Cambridge Introduction to Virginia Woolf - Cambridge University Press 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.cambridge.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .After that, how unbelievable death was!^ After that, how unbelievable death was!
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    — that it must end; and no one in the whole world would know how she had loved it all.

To the Lighthouse (1927)

.
  • A light here required a shadow there.^ A light here required a shadow there.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Part I, Chapter 9
  • A sort of transaction went on between them, in which she was on one side, and life was on another, and she was always trying to get the better of it, as it was of her; and sometimes they parleyed (when she sat alone); there were, she remembered, great reconciliation scenes; but for the most part, oddly enough, she must admit that she felt this thing that she called life terrible, hostile, and quick to pounce on you if you gave it a chance.^ And I sat there and I watched you, and you werent there !

    ^ They sat side by side .
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Part I, Chapter 9 A sort of transaction went on between them, in which she was on one side, and life was on another, and she was always trying to get the better of it, as it was of her; and sometimes they parleyed (when she sat alone); there were, she remembered, great reconciliation scenes; but for the most part, oddly enough, she must admit that she felt this thing that she called life terrible, hostile, and quick to pounce on you if you gave it a chance.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .There were the eternal problems: suffering; death; the poor.^ There were the eternal problems: suffering; death; the poor.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .There was always a woman dying of cancer even here.^ There was always a woman dying of cancer even here.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Opposite them stood a Dutch cabinet with blue china on the shelves; the sun of the April evening made a bright stain here and there on the glass.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And yet she had said to all these children, You shall go through with it.^ And yet she had said to all these children, You shall go through with it.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But to go deeper, beneath what people said (and these judgements, how superficial, how fragmentary they are!
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ March 25, 2008, 6:57 pm Ah, but if you just say “Doggonit, Pierre ain’t here yet”, then you’re not going to demonstrate that nothingness lies coiled at the heart of being , which is what this is all about.
    • Talking Philosophy | Virginia Woolf and Jean-Paul Sartre 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC blog.talkingphilosophy.com [Source type: Original source]

    .To eight people she had said relentlessly that...^ To eight people she had said relentlessly that...
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For that reason, knowing what was before them — love and ambition and being wretched alone in dreary places — she had often the feeling, Why must they grow up and lose it all?^ For that reason, knowing what was before them — love and ambition and being wretched alone in dreary places — she had often the feeling, Why must they grow up and lose it all?
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She muddled Armenians and Turks; loved success; hated discomfort; must be liked; talked oceans of nonsense: and to this day, ask her what the Equator was, and she did not know.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For example, the way servants can be treated as if they don't exist; or the way African-Americans were often treated in the United States before the Civil Rights movement; or the lack of status held by women in many places in the world.
    • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Essay by Bill Johnson 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.storyispromise.com [Source type: General]

    .And then she said to herself, brandishing her sword at life, Nonsense.^ And then she said to herself, brandishing her sword at life, Nonsense.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They will be perfectly happy.^ They will be perfectly happy.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Part I, Chapter 10
  • There is a code of behaviour, she knew, whose seventh article (it may be) says that on occasions of this sort it behoves the woman, whatever her own occupation might be, to go to the help of the young man opposite so that he may expose and relieve the thigh bones, the ribs, of his vanity, of his urgent desire to assert himself; as indeed it is their duty, she reflected, in her old maidenly fairness, to help us, suppose the Tube were to burst into flames.^ Part I, Chapter 10 There is a code of behaviour, she knew, whose seventh article (it may be) says that on occasions of this sort it behoves the woman, whatever her own occupation might be, to go to the help of the young man opposite so that he may expose and relieve the thigh bones, the ribs, of his vanity, of his urgent desire to assert himself; as indeed it is their duty, she reflected, in her old maidenly fairness, to help us, suppose the Tube were to burst into flames.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It'd be fair to say it gets quite excruciating at times due to the lack of variety and the occasionally head-aching nature of the proceedings.
    • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Movie Reviews, Photos & Videos, Layouts & Wallpapers, Fan Club 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.flixster.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ In fairness, I suppose Sartre couldn’t know in advance that this would become such a talked about part of the book.
    • Talking Philosophy | Virginia Woolf and Jean-Paul Sartre 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC blog.talkingphilosophy.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Then, she thought, I should certainly expect Mr Tansley to get me out.^ Then, she thought, I should certainly expect Mr Tansley to get me out.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But how would it be, she thought, if neither of us did either of these things?^ But how would it be, she thought, if neither of us did either of these things?
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ ORIGEN: These things must happen to each of us mystically - In Greek and English .
    • Virginia Woolf : Aeschylus translated brings despair 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.ellopos.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Why would she kill herself if she said half the things her husband did?
    • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC hal.ucr.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .So she sat there smiling.^ So she sat there smiling.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Part I, Chapter 17
  • For our penitence deserves a glimpse only; our toil respite only. .
    • Part II, Chapter 3
  • "Like a work of art," she repeated, looking from her canvas to the drawing-room steps and back again.^ Part II, Chapter 3 "Like a work of art," she repeated, looking from her canvas to the drawing-room steps and back again.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And he came into the dining-room looking like a cricketer, in flannels, wearing a blue coat with brass buttons; though he was enraged.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Back in the editing room through the summer of 1995, we developed a way of working together by consensus.
    • Virginia Woolf Article 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.mith.umd.edu [Source type: General]

    .She must rest for a moment.^ She must rest for a moment.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And, resting, looking from one to the other vaguely, the old question which transversed the sky of the soul perpetually, the vast, the general question which was apt to particularise itself at such moments as these, when she released faculties that had been on the strain, stood over her, paused over her, darkened over her.^ And, resting, looking from one to the other vaguely, the old question which transversed the sky of the soul perpetually, the vast, the general question which was apt to particularise itself at such moments as these, when she released faculties that had been on the strain, stood over her, paused over her, darkened over her.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ SUCH AN EXPRESSION of unhappiness was enough by itself to make one's eyes slide above the paper's edge to the poor woman's face?

    ^ These years in the company of the Bloomsbury buggers continued the healing process begun by friendships such as the one with Violet Dickinson.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    What is the meaning of life? .That was all — a simple question; one that tended to close in on one with years.^ That was all — a simple question; one that tended to close in on one with years.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For years and years they grow, without paying any attention to us, in meadows, in forests, and by the side of rivers--all things one likes to think about.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Infant System For Developing the Intellectual and Moral Powers of all Children, from One to Seven years of Age (English) (as Author) Wilder, Stephen .
    • Browse By Author: W - Project Gutenberg 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The great revelation had never come.^ The great revelation perhaps never did come.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The great revelation had never come.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The great revelation perhaps never did come.^ The great revelation perhaps never did come.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The great revelation had never come.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Instead there were little daily miracles, illuminations, matches struck unexpectedly in the dark; here was one.^ Instead there were little daily miracles, illuminations, matches struck unexpectedly in the dark; here was one.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dark was the trunk in the middle, and the branches sprang here and there, leaving jagged intervals of light between them as distinctly as if it had but that second risen from the ground.
    • Virginia Woolf: The quiet revolutionary - Salon.com 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why, after all, should one not be born there as one is born here, helpless, speechless, unable to focus one's eyesight, groping at the roots of the grass, at the toes of the Giants?
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    This, that, and the other; herself and Charles Tansley and the breaking wave; Mrs. Ramsay bringing them together; Mrs. Ramsay saying, "Life stand still here"; Mrs. Ramsay making of the moment something permanent (as in another sphere Lily herself tried to make of the moment something permanent) — this was of the nature of a revelation. .In the midst of chaos there was shape; this eternal passing and flowing (she looked at the cloud going and the leaves shaking) was struck into stability.^ In the midst of chaos there was shape; this eternal passing and flowing (she looked at the cloud going and the leaves shaking) was struck into stability.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I recently found an ad for craft college and I'm going to look into it.
    • The Happiness Project: Jung, Buffy, Twilight, Virginia Woolf -- and Happiness. 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.happiness-project.com [Source type: General]

    Life stand still here, Mrs. Ramsay said. "Mrs. Ramsay! Mrs. Ramsay!" she repeated. She owed it all to her.
    • Part III, Chapter 3

A Room of One's Own (1929)

Harcourt, Brace & World, 1957, ISBN 0-156-78732-6
.
  • A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.^ A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For a discussion of the way Winterson's persona has been presented in the media, you might enjoy a paper I presented a few years ago: " With 'money and a room of her own': The Legacy of Woolf's Advice for the Woman Artist at Century's End ."
    • Web Resources for Women Writers 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.k-state.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Longer non-fiction works include A Room of One's Own (1929), in which Woolf asserts that "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction," and Three Guineas (1938), which argues that education, politics, and the press are dominated by patriarchal values which celebrate competition and war, and oppress women.
    • University of Delaware: VIRGINIA WOOLF TURNING THE CENTURIES 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.lib.udel.edu [Source type: Academic]

    • Ch. 1 (p. .4)
  • When a subject is highly controversial — and any question about sex is that — one cannot hope to tell the truth.^ To tell the truth about oneself, to discover oneself near at hand, is not easy..
    • Search Results for Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.azete.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Whenever Woolf's most recent biographer, Hermione Lee, finds herself engaged in a conversation about her subject, she points out that she is inevitably asked one or several of the same four questions, one of which is "Wasn't she the most terrible snob?"
    • Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.bridgew.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ But these contributions to the dangerous and fascinating subject of the psychology of the other sex—it is one, I hope, that you will investigate when you have five hundred a year of your own—were interrupted by the necessity of paying the bill.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .One can only show how one came to hold whatever opinion one does hold.^ One can only show how one came to hold whatever opinion one does hold.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How does one define Bloomsbury?
    • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

    ^ How does the end of the chapter provide a transition to the next one?
    • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC hal.ucr.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .One can only give one's audience the chance of drawing their own conclusions as they observe the limitations, the prejudices, the idiosyncrasies of the speaker.^ A Room of One's Own grew out of a lecture that Virginia Woolf had been invited to give at Girton College, Cambridge in 1928.

    ^ This again invites consideration of a more egalitarian society, similar to the conclusion just drawn from Room of One's Own.
    • Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.bridgew.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The conclusion to be drawn from Room of One's Own is that people, women in particular, are endowed with all kinds of potential, some of which will be expressed and much never to be expressed.
    • Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.bridgew.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • Ch. 1 (p. .4)
  • The beauty of the world which is so soon to perish, has two edges, one of laughter, one of anguish, cutting the heart asunder.^ She experienced terrible emotional oscillations exacerbated by the death of loved ones, an awareness of being eternally vulnerable by reason of being female, and the horror of two world wars.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 1 (p. .17)
  • The human frame being what it is, heart, body and brain all mixed together, and not contained in separate compartments as they will be no doubt in another million years, a good dinner is of great importance to good talk.^ The human frame being what it is, heart, body and brain all mixed together, and not contained in separate compartments as they will be no doubt in another million years, a good dinner is of great importance to good talk.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No doubt there are countless other examples of (relatively) contemporaneous writers expressing similar ideas to one another based on the vast body of ideas which floated around throughout their education and not necessarily for any plagiaristic reasons?
    • Talking Philosophy | Virginia Woolf and Jean-Paul Sartre 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC blog.talkingphilosophy.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence the enormous importance to a patriarch who has to conquer, who has to rule, of feeling that great numbers of people, half the human race indeed, are by nature inferior to himself.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.^ One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.
    • Virginia Woolf - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 1 (p. .18)
  • Have you any notion how many books are written about women in the course of one year?^ Have you any notion of how many books are written about women in the course of one year?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Have you any notion how many are written by men?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My book, THE HAPPINESS PROJECT , is a memoir of the year I spent test-driving the wisdom of the ages, the current scientific studies, and the lessons from popular culture about how to be happy--from Aristotle to Martin Seligman to Thoreau to Oprah.
    • The Happiness Project: Jung, Buffy, Twilight, Virginia Woolf -- and Happiness. 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.happiness-project.com [Source type: General]

    .Have you any notion how many are written by men?^ Have you any notion how many are written by men?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Have you any notion of how many books are written about women in the course of one year?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ REFLECTIONS 1.How have Mrs. Ramsay and many women of the era been raised to view and to treat men?
    • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC hal.ucr.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Are you aware that you are, perhaps, the most discussed animal in the universe?^ Are you aware that you are, perhaps, the most discussed animal in the universe?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 2 (p. .26)
  • Life for both sexes — and I looked at them, shouldering their way along the pavement — is arduous, difficult, a perpetual struggle.^ Life for both sexes—and I looked at them, shouldering their way along the pavement—is arduous, difficult, a perpetual struggle.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .It calls for gigantic courage and strength.^ It calls for gigantic courage and strength.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .More than anything, perhaps, creatures of illusion as we are, it calls for confidence in oneself.^ More than anything, perhaps, creatures of illusion as we are, it calls for confidence in oneself.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If what is meant by the charge were nothing more than the absence of overt lovemaking, then perhaps one could agree that the novels are "sexless."
    • VQR » Virginia Woolf: Art and Sexuality 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.vqronline.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Without self-confidence we are as babes in the cradle.
    And how can we generate this imponderable quality, which is yet so invaluable, most quickly?^ And how can we generate this imponderable quality, which is yet so invaluable, most quickly?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Without self–confidence we are as babes in the cradle.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As Woolf wondered in The Waves: "How to describe the world seen without a self?"
    • Virginia Woolf and the Self : The Frontal Cortex 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC scienceblogs.com [Source type: Original source]

    .By thinking that other people are inferior to one self.^ By thinking that other people are inferior to one self.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That is the sort of people they were--very interesting people, and I think of them so often, in such queer places, because one will never see them again, never know what happened next.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Second: One of the best ways to make yourself happy is to make other people happy; One of the best ways to make other people happy is to be happy yourself.
    • The Happiness Project: Jung, Buffy, Twilight, Virginia Woolf -- and Happiness. 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.happiness-project.com [Source type: General]

    .By feeling that one has some innate superiority — it may be wealth, or rank, a straight nose, or the portrait of a grandfather by Romney — for there is no end to the pathetic devices of the human imagination — over other people.^ By feeling that one has some innate superiority—it may be wealth, or rank, a straight nose, or the portrait of a grandfather by Romney—for there is no end to the pathetic devices of the human imagination—over other people.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perhaps the mind could be a machine, or some isolated "natural mind" with any memories of its pre-computer time erased, and no trace of innate awareness or sensations of body.
    • Virginia Woolf and the Self : The Frontal Cortex 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC scienceblogs.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence the enormous importance to a patriarch who has to conquer, who has to rule, of feeling that great numbers of people, half the human race indeed, are by nature inferior to himself.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 2 (p. .35)
  • Women have served all these centuries as looking-glasses possessing the magic and delicious power of reflecting the figure of man at twice its natural size.^ Women have served all these centuries as looking–glasses possessing the magic and delicious power of reflecting the figure of man at twice its natural size.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yet it seemed absurd, I thought, turning over the evening paper, that a man with all this power should be angry.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The first point is that all three of these ways of looking at the subject are interrelated.
    • Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.bridgew.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • Ch. 2 (p. .35)
  • Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners.^ See all from $3.13 New only from $4.35 List of all editions More books like this Add to wishlist 18.
    • Virginia Woolf Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.alibris.com [Source type: General]

    Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible; Shakespeare's plays, for instance, seem to hang there complete by themselves. .But when the web is pulled askew, hooked up at the edge, torn in the middle, one remembers that these webs are not spun in midair by incorporeal creatures, but are the work of suffering human beings, and are attached to the grossly material things, like health and money and the houses we live in.^ I need not, I am afraid, describe in any detail the hardness of the work, for you know perhaps women who have done it; nor the difficulty of living on the money when it was earned, for you may have tried.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The one thing that unites these very different characters is the experience in some form of sexual apprehension fear of male sexual passion, fear of patriarchal domination, fear, in short, that the fact of their sex will work against them as they try to fulfill their human potential.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The deterioration of the natural and human environment has very much been the result of the pursuit of profits, property and material well-being by capitalist nations.
    • Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.bridgew.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • Ch. 3 (pp. .43-44)
  • I would venture to guess than Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.^ Moreover, Woolf also suggests that many a poem signed by the name "Anonymous" was often written by a woman.
    • Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.bridgew.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ For every Emily Dickinson, who wrote shocking little poems for a spinsterly recluse, we can discover a Norman Mailer, who writes just the kind of novels one would expect him to write.
    • VQR » Virginia Woolf: Art and Sexuality 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.vqronline.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 3 (p. .51)
  • For it needs little skill in psychology to be sure that a highly gifted girl who had tried to use her gift for poetry would have been so thwarted and hindered by other people, so tortured and pulled asunder by her own contrary instincts, that she must have lost her health and sanity to a certainty.^ I need not, I am afraid, describe in any detail the hardness of the work, for you know perhaps women who have done it; nor the difficulty of living on the money when it was earned, for you may have tried.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Making some excuse or other, he would leave the company as soon as they had dined, or steal away from the skaters, who were forming sets for a quadrille.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Who else is trying to balance their lives and needs with Mr. Ramsay's?
    • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC hal.ucr.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 3 (p. .51)
  • Literature is strewn with the wreckage of men who have minded beyond reason the opinions of others.^ She was determined to live in Russia, where there were frozen rivers and wild horses and men, she said, who gashed each other's throats open.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 3 (p. 58)
  • I told you in the course of this paper that Shakespeare had a sister; but do not look for her in Sir Sidney Lee's life of the poet. She died young — alas, she never wrote a word... .Now my belief is that this poet who never wrote a word and was buried at the cross-roads still lives.^ It is pure Woolf, then -- it could be Woolf herself speaking -- when Rachel says of her elderly aunts, who are still living their uneventful lives in England as she sails to South America: .
    • Virginia Woolf: The quiet revolutionary - Salon.com 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "You hurry up and get off to your prep., my boy," he said, glancing at Martin, who was still eating.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    .She lives in you and in me, and in many other women who are not here to-night, for they are washing up the dishes and putting the children to bed.^ All assumptions founded on the facts observed when women were the protected sex will have disappeared—as, for example (here a squad of soldiers marched down the street), that women and clergymen and gardeners live longer than other people.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Have you any notion of how many books are written about women in the course of one year?
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I need not, I am afraid, describe in any detail the hardness of the work, for you know perhaps women who have done it; nor the difficulty of living on the money when it was earned, for you may have tried.
    • A room of one's own, by Virginia Woolf (chapter2) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .But she lives; for great poets do not die; they are continuing presences; they need only the opportunity to walk among us in the flesh.^ Listen to Virginia Woolf's 1929 " Eulogy to words: Words don't live in dictionaries, they live in the mind " (BBC, 7'29'') - needs RealPlayer .
    • Virginia Woolf : Aeschylus translated brings despair 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.ellopos.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ While their conflicts are not overwhelmingly intense enough to crash down their marriage, they are intense enough to have burned them up, and to have built up enough tensions between them that they need to release them so as to continue their normal life.

    ^ They continued to walk for some time in silence.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 6 (p. .117)
  • My belief is that if we live another century or so — I am talking of the common life which is the real life and not of the little separate lives which we live as individuals — and have five hundred a year each of us and rooms of our own; if we have the habit of freedom and the courage to write exactly what we think; if we escape a little from the common sitting-room and see human beings not always in their relation to each other but in relation to reality; and the sky, too, and the trees or whatever it may be in themselves; if we look past Milton's bogey, for no human being should shut out the view; if we face the fact, for it is a fact, that there is no arm to cling to, but that we go alone and that our relation is to the world of reality and not only to the world of men and women, then the opportunity will come and the dead poet who was Shakespeare's sister will put on the body which she has so often laid down.^ PLATO ANTHOLOGY: The world is a living being .
    • Virginia Woolf : Aeschylus translated brings despair 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.ellopos.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ For every artist who reviews his life in art, there is another who lives it in art.
    • VQR » Virginia Woolf: Art and Sexuality 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.vqronline.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What areas of life do the men concern themselves with?
    • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC hal.ucr.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Drawing her life from the lives of the unknown who were her forerunners, as her brother did before her, she will be born.^ For every artist who reviews his life in art, there is another who lives it in art.
    • VQR » Virginia Woolf: Art and Sexuality 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.vqronline.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Adrian Leslie Stephens (1883-1948) was Virginia's younger brother, who lived with her in 1907 after the marriage of their sister Vanessa 15 , and again in 1911.
    • Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.bridgew.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .As for her coming without that preparation, without that effort on our part, without that determination that when she is born again she shall find it possible to live and write her poetry, that we cannot expect, for that would be impossible.^ Adherence to social dictates having now become the most imperious need of her nature, Orlando finds that she cannot be contented (and cannot write) without satisfying her left hands irresistible longing for a wedding-ring.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A more candid, sullen face it would be impossible to find.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    .But I maintain that she would come if we worked for her, and that so to work, even in poverty and obscurity, is worth while.^ And how childlike he would be, come in tired of an evening, she thought, and how majestic; a little overbearing perhaps; "But I wouldn't give way," she thought.
    • VQR » Virginia Woolf: Art and Sexuality 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.vqronline.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 6 (pp. 117-118)

The Waves (1931)

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1978, ISBN 0-15-694960-1
  • Here on this ring of grass we have sat together, bound by the tremendous power of some inner compulsion. The trees wave, the clouds pass. The time approaches when these soliloquies shall be shared. .We shall not always give out a sound like a beaten gong as one sensation strikes and then another.^ So one thing led to another; and the conglomeration of things pressed you flat, held you fast, like a fish in water.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So Nick and Honey are like sounding board through which Martha and George pour out what they feel to each other.

    ^ Slowly wheeling, like the rays of a searchlight, the days, the weeks, the years passed one after another across the sky.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    Children, our lives have been gongs striking; clamour and boasting; cries of despair; blows on the nape of the neck in gardens.
    • pp. 39-40
  • Things have dropped from me. I have outlived certain desires; I have lost friends, some by death... others through sheer inability to cross the street.
    • p. .186
  • Yet there are moments when the walls of the mind grow thin; when nothing is unabsorbed, and I could fancy that we might blow so vast a bubble that the sun might set and rise in it and we might take the blue of midday and the black of midnight and be cast off and escape from here and now.^ But he paused a moment, as if there was nothing particular for him to be off to.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Rivers could be seen and pleasure boats gliding on them; and galleons setting out to sea; and armadas with puffs of smoke from which came the dull thud of cannon firing; and forts on the coast; and castles among the meadows; and here a watch tower; and there a fortress; and again some vast mansion like that of Orlando's father, massed like a town in the valley circled by walls.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Now, my boy, take yourself off and get on with your prep.," he said to Martin.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    • p. .224
  • I like the copious, shapeless, warm, not so very clever, but extremely easy and rather coarse aspect of things; the talk of men in clubs and public-houses; of miners half naked in drawers — the forthright, perfectly unassuming, and without end in view except dinner, love, money and getting along tolerably; that which is without great hopes, ideals, or anything of that kind; what is unassuming except to make a tolerably, good job of it.^ Interminable processions of shoppers in the West end, of business men in the East, paraded the pavements, like caravans perpetually marching,--so it seemed to those who had any reason to pause, say, to post a letter, or at a club window in Piccadilly.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Talking, talking, talking—as if everything could be talked— the soul itself slipped through the lips in thin silver discs which dissolve in young men's minds like silver, like moonlight."
    • VQR » Virginia Woolf: Art and Sexuality 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.vqronline.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus when he left the club he turned not East, where the busy men were going; nor West where his own house in Abercorn Terrace was; but took his way along the hard paths through the Green Park towards Westminster.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    I like all that.
    • p. 246

Three Guineas (1938)

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1966, ISBN 0-156-90177-3
  • Though we see the same world, we see it through different eyes. Any help we can give you must be different from that you can give yourselves, and perhaps the value of that help may lie in the fact of that difference.
    • Ch. 1 (p. 18)
  • Directly the mulberry tree begins to make you circle, break off. Pelt the tree with laughter.
    • Ch. 2 (p. 80)
  • The outsider will say, "in fact, as a woman, I have no country. As a woman I want no country. As a woman my country is the whole world." .And if, when reason has said its say, still some obstinate emotion remains, some love of England dropped into a child's ears by the cawing of rooks in an elm tree, by the splash of waves on a beach, or by English voices murmuring nursery rhymes, this drop of pure, if irrational, emotion she will make serve her to give to England first what she desires of peace and freedom for the whole world.^ On a single day in June, 1939, just before England is plunged into World War II, a village pageant becomes an allegory for British history.
    • Virginia Woolf Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.alibris.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Orlandos resolutions regarding love are first tested by the Roumaninan Archduke, who had originally driven her out of England by hanging about the estate dressed as a woman.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Recovering from the first shock of the experience, Rachel enters another emotional state that resonates She became peaceful too, at the same time possessed with a strange exultation.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 3 (p. 109)

The Death of the Moth and Other Essays (1942)

  • The artist after all is a solitary being.
    • "The Historian and 'The Gibbon'"
  • Once you begin to take yourself seriously as a leader or as a follower, as a modern or as a conservative, then you become a self-conscious, biting, and scratching little animal whose work is not of the slightest value or importance to anybody. .
    • "A Letter to a Young Poet"
  • Lines slip easily down the accustomed grooves.^ July: Letter to a Young Poet is published.

    ^ Letter to a young poet [by] Virginia Woolf.

    The old designs are copied so glibly that we are half inclined to think them original, save for that very glibness. .
    • "A Letter to a Young Poet"
  • I mean, what is a woman?^ Letter to a young poet [by] Virginia Woolf.

    I assure you, I do not know. I do not believe that you know. I do not believe that anybody can know until she has expressed herself in all the arts and professions open to human skill.
    • "Professions for Women"
  • Outwardly, what is simpler than to write books? .Outwardly, what obstacles are there for a woman rather than for a man?^ It is obstacles to the consummation of passion rather than passion itself that Woolf now sees as ugly and debasing.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It looked a town rather than a house, but a town built, not hither and thither, as this man wished or that, but circumspectly, by a single architect with one idea in his head.
    • NYSL Travels: Virginia Woolf's London (Marylin Bender) 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

    Inwardly, I think, the case is very different; she has still many ghosts to fight, many prejudices to overcome. .Indeed it will be a long time still, I think, before a woman can sit down to write a book without finding a phantom to be slain, a rock to be dashed against.^ I can think sitting still as well as standing up.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Adherence to social dictates having now become the most imperious need of her nature, Orlando finds that she cannot be contented (and cannot write) without satisfying her left hands irresistible longing for a wedding-ring.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A Man and a Woman (English) (as Author) The Story of Ab A Tale of the Time of the Cave Man (English) (as Author) The Wolf's Long Howl (English) (as Author) Waterlow, Sydney, 1878-1944 .
    • Browse By Author: W - Project Gutenberg 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And if this is so in literature, the freest of all professions for women, how is it in the new professions which you are now for the first time entering?^ Recovering from the first shock of the experience, Rachel enters another emotional state that resonates She became peaceful too, at the same time possessed with a strange exultation.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • "Professions for Women"

The Moment and Other Essays (1948)

.
  • If you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people.^ "Now tell us, Papa," said Delia boldly--she was his favourite daughter--"what you've been doing with yourself.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    • "The Leaning Tower"
    • Lecture delivered to the Workers' Educational Association, Brighton, May 1940

Granite and Rainbow (1958)

  • The extraordinary woman depends on the ordinary woman. It is only when we know what were the conditions of the average woman's life ... it is only when we can measure the way of life and the experience of life made possible to the ordinary woman that we can account for the success or failure of the extraordinary woman as a writer.
    • "Women and Fiction"
  • But the novels of women were not affected only by the necessarily narrow range of the writer's experience. They showed, at least in the nineteenth century, another characteristic which may be traced to the writer's sex. In Middlemarch and in Jane Eyre we are conscious not merely of the writer's character, as we are conscious of the character of Charles Dickens, but we are conscious of a woman's presence — of someone resenting the treatment of her sex and pleading for its rights. .
    • "Women and Fiction"
  • If, then, one should try to sum up the character of women's fiction at the present moment, one would say that it is courageous; it is sincere; it keeps closely to what women feel.^ As for saying which are trees, and which are men and women, or whether there are such things, that one won't be in a condition to do for fifty years or so.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One of these days--that was his euphemism for the time when his wife was dead--he would give up London, he thought, and live in the country.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I might get up, but if I got up and looked at it, ten to one I shouldn't be able to say for certain; because once a thing's done, no one ever knows how it happened.
    • Adeline Virginia Woolf née Stephen Notes | Facebook 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

    It is not bitter. It does not insist upon its femininity.
    • "Women and Fiction"
  • In the past, the virtue of women's writing often lay in its divine spontaneity ... But it was also, and much more often, chattering and garrulous ... In future, granted time and books and a little space in the house for herself, literature will become for women, as for men, an art to be studied. Women's gift will be trained and strengthened. The novel will cease to be the dumping-ground for the personal emotions. .It will become, more than at present, a work of art like any other, and its resources and its limitations will be explored.^ Her purpose in the action of the novel is to present the pageant of English literary history which accounts for more than half the novels length.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virginia was cruelly honest about her lack of physical attraction towards Leonard - when you kissed me the other day I feel no more than a rock.
    • Cause for Fear: Sexual Apprehension in the Writings of Virginia Woolf 11 January 2010 21:27 UTC www.stwing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the process of continuous examination of our own conflicts and interactions, we have been able to become more open and direct and comfortable with each other.

    • "Women and Fiction"

Books and Portraits (1977)

  • The strongest natures, when they are influenced, submit the most unreservedly: it is perhaps a sign of their strength.

Misattributions

  • Thought and theory must precede all salutary action; yet action is nobler in itself than either thought or theory.
    • Sometimes ascribed to Virginia Woolf, but it appeared as early as 1854 in Anna Jameson's A Commonplace Book of Thoughts, Memories and Fancies, where it is ascribed to William Wordsworth.

External links

Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English

Virginia Woolf
Born January 25, 1882
London, England
Died March 28, 1941
England
Cause of death Suicide

Virginia Woolf (born January 25, 1882 in London) was an English writer.

She was born into a famous family. Her father, Leslie Stephen, was a Victorian scholar. Her sister, Vanessa Bell, was a painter. She had two brothers; one of them, Thoby, died in World War I.

Virginia was an author. She was a part of the famous Bloomsbury group. She wrote novels, short stories, and plays. Her most famous books are To The Lighthouse and Mrs Dalloway.

Virginia Woolf died on March 28, 1941. She committed suicide by drowning in the river Ouse.

Other websites


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 17, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Virginia Woolf, which are similar to those in the above article.








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message