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Vlado Kreslin
Vlado Kreslin with his »black guitar«

Vlado Kreslin (born 29 November 1953) is a Slovenian folk rock musician.

Kreslin was born in the village of Beltinci in the Prekmurje region of Slovenia, then part of former Yugoslavia. He began his music career in his student years, as a singer with the rock group Martin Krpan. He later continued playing a mixture of Slovene folk and rock music with the Beltinška Banda, a folk group from his native village, whose other members were all over 70 years old. Nowadays he is one of the best known and highly-esteemed Slovenian musicians and songwriters drawing on Slovene folk heritage. His annual concerts at the Cankar Hall in Ljubljana have become traditional event in the city's yearly cultural calendar. He has performed worldwide, from Adelaide to Barcelona, and has opened for many other bands, such as R.E.M.. His genre is a type of blues mixed with Slovene folk music.

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he went on several tours with the rock singers Pero Lovšin and Zoran Predin. Among others, they composed the anthem of the Slovenia national football team for the 2000 European Football Championship.

Discography [1]

  • Cesta
  • Koncert (CD/DVD)
  • Generacija
  • Kreslinčice (double CD)
  • Woyzeck
  • Ptič
  • The Best of Vlado Kreslin
  • Muzika
  • Namesto koga roža cveti
  • Najlepša leta našega življenja
  • Pikapolonica
  • Vsi eeenaki

References

  1. ^ Official Discography

External links


Vlado Kreslin
Born November 29, 1953 (1953-11-29) (age 57)
Origin Beltinci, SR Slovenia, Yugoslavia (Now Slovenia)
Genres folk rock
Occupations Singer, Composer
Associated acts Martin Krpan, Beltinška banda
Website Vlado Kreslin official website
Notable instruments
Guitar

Vlado Kreslin (born 29 November 1953) in Beltinci, SR Slovenia, Yugoslavia is a Slovenian folk rock musician.

Kreslin was born in the village of Beltinci in the Prekmurje region of Slovenia, then part of Yugoslavia. He began his musical career in his student years, as a singer with the rock group Martin Krpan. He later continued playing a mixture of Slovene folk and rock music with the Beltinška Banda, a folk group from his native village, whose other members were all over 70 years old.

Today he is one of the best-known and highly-esteemed Slovenian musicians and songwriters drawing on Slovene folk and ethnic heritage,[1] occupying his own niche in the Slovenian music scene.[2] He has been referred to as an ethno-revivalist for his modernization of Slovenian folk songs such as "All the Wreaths have Wilted".[3] Even modern Slovenian rock bands such as Siddharta benefit from working with him.[4]

His annual concerts at Cankar Hall in Ljubljana have become traditional event in the city's yearly cultural calendar. He has performed worldwide, from Adelaide to Barcelona, and has opened for many other bands, such as R.E.M.. His genre is a type of blues mixed with Slovene folk music. In addition to performing songs in Slovenian, Kreslin's repertoire also includes songs sung in English, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, and Judaeo-Spanish, as well as folk songs sung in various dialects (from his native Prekmurje, Međimurje, and elsewhere).

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he went on several tours with the rock singers Pero Lovšin and Zoran Predin. Among other things, they composed the anthem of the Slovenia national football team for the 2000 European Football Championship.

Kreslin sing also in his home language, in prekmurian.

Discography [5]

  • Cesta
  • Koncert (CD/DVD)
  • Generacija
  • Kreslinčice (double CD)
  • Woyzeck
  • Ptič
  • The Best of Vlado Kreslin
  • Muzika
  • Namesto koga roža cveti
  • Najlepša leta našega življenja
  • Pikapolonica
  • Vsi eeenaki

References

  1. ^ Buchanan, Donna Anne (2007). Balkan popular culture and the Ottoman ecumene: music, image, and regional political discourse. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 88–89. ISBN 081086021X, 9780810860216. http://books.google.com/books?id=E6FYiC_XjgoC&pg=PA88&dq=%22Vlado+Kreslin%22&hl=en&ei=nWj9S9yhC8WBlAeb7_HCDw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=%22Vlado%20Kreslin%22&f=false. 
  2. ^ Ramet, Sabrina P.; Crnković, Gordana (2003). Kazaaam! splat! ploof!: the American impact on European popular culture since 1945. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 180–181. ISBN 0742500012, 9780742500013. http://books.google.com/books?id=9bS9GIZqMRMC&pg=PA181&dq=%22Vlado+Kreslin%22&hl=en&ei=nWj9S9yhC8WBlAeb7_HCDw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CEgQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=%22Vlado%20Kreslin%22&f=false. 
  3. ^ Snel, Guido (2004). Alter ego: twenty confronting views on the European experience. Amsterdam University Press. p. 58. ISBN 9053566880, 9789053566886. http://books.google.com/books?id=X-VrRWU6n8EC&pg=PA58&dq=%22Vlado+Kreslin%22&hl=en&ei=nWj9S9yhC8WBlAeb7_HCDw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22Vlado%20Kreslin%22&f=false. 
  4. ^ Cox, John K. (2005). Slovenia: evolving loyalties. Routledge. p. 136. ISBN 0415274311, 9780415274319. http://books.google.com/books?id=NV9Ky3VCo3sC&pg=PA136&dq=%22Vlado+Kreslin%22&hl=en&ei=nWj9S9yhC8WBlAeb7_HCDw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22Vlado%20Kreslin%22&f=false. 
  5. ^ Official Discography

External links

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