Vologda: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vologda (English)
Вологда (Russian)
—  Inhabited locality  —
Sophienkathedrale.jpg
Saint Sophia Cathedral
Vologda is located in Russia
Location of Vologda on the map of Russia
Coordinates: 59°13′00″N 39°54′00″E / 59.2166667°N 39.9°E / 59.2166667; 39.9Coordinates: 59°13′00″N 39°54′00″E / 59.2166667°N 39.9°E / 59.2166667; 39.9
Coat of Arms of Vologda (Vologda oblast) (1780).png
Coat of arms
Administrative status
Country Russia
Federal subject Vologda Region
Statistics
Area 116 km2 (44.8 sq mi)[citation needed]
Population (2002 Census) 293,046 inhabitants[1]
Rank 64
- Density 2,526 /km2 (6,500/sq mi)[2]
Time zone
Founded 1147[citation needed]
Postal code(s) 160000[citation needed]
Dialing code(s) +7 8172[citation needed]
Official website Site

Vologda (Russian: Во́логда) is a city in Russia and the administrative center of Vologda Oblast. Population: 293,700 (2008 est.); 293,046 (2002 Census).[3] Vologda takes its name, of likely Finno-Ugrian origin, from the Vologda River which flows through the city.

The city is served by Vologda Airport and is host to Fedotovo, a major Russian Navy air base 44 km to the west.

Contents

History

Vologda was first mentioned in Novgorod chronicles for 1147, when Saint Gerasimus found a church and village already standing there. Surrounded by impassable woods, the settlement was inhabited by Novgorodians who pulled the ships from a tributary of the Volga to a tributary of the Northern Dvina, thus making possible navigation from the White Sea to the Caspian. In 1273 the city was ravaged by a Mongol raid.

It was not until 1412, when the area was ceded by Novgorod Republic to Muscovy, that the town acquired any measure of importance. The princes of Muscovy made Vologda their outpost in the North. By the end of the century, Vologda eclipsed the ancient centre of that region, Belozersk. Its commercial importance further increased when the Muscovy Company started its operations in Russia.

On September 22, 1612 Poles and Lithuanians invaded Vologda, burned the city, vandalized churches and exterminated the population and clergy of the city. [4] As the result in the beginning of 17th century the city and its outskirts were devastated. [5]

However with the reign of Michael, the city began to restore, Vologda Kremlin had been rebuilt. Under the decree of Catherine II Vologda became a centre of the Vologda gubernia (province).

Main sights

Location

Vologda's Saint Sophia, consecrated in 1570 and named after Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod, was one of the largest cathedrals built in Russia up to that time. It had been ordered by Ivan the Terrible to be rebuilt in stone in the 15th century. Its superb frescoes were painted in 1686–1688 by Dmitry Plekhanov from Yaroslavl. A lofty octagonal belltower was added in 1654–1659 and built up in the nineteenth century. A local museum occupies the neighbouring Treasury chambers (1659). The main points of interest outside Kremlin walls are the eighteenth century baroque churches and the 19 century Neoclassical mansions.

Just two kilometers from the historic centre of Vologda stands the Spaso-Prilutsky Monastery, founded in 1371 by one of Sergii Radonezhsky's disciples. With Dmitry Donskoy as its patron, the monastery quickly developed into the richest landowner in the neighbourhood. Its five-domed cathedral was erected in 1537–1542. Almost all other structures—a refectory, a winter church, holy gates with a barbican—were also constructed prior to the Time of Troubles, when the cloister was occasionally besieged by the Polish units and gangs of brigands. The time of anarchy over, the monastery's thick walls and towers were renovated. Soviet authorities banished the monks and turned the cloister into a museum. Some remarkable specimens of early wooden architecture were transported here from distant villages of the Vologda region.

Culture

Vologda is known all over Russia for its cheese and butter, reputedly the best in Russia. The Romantic poet Konstantin Batyushkov was born and died in Vologda. There is also a small museum of Peter the Great.

Balanovsky 2008 published genetic research data on Vologda and found results connecting it, along with Krasnoborsk, to a genetic grouping otherwise most common in Scandinavia which would be in common with settlements or migrations from that area (i.e. Viking or Varangian) or simply represent an ancient genetic relatedness. According to 11.6% of a sampling of 121 tested at Vologda belong to the I1a haplogroup (12.1% of 91 tested belonged to said group in Krasnoborsk) these frequencies are higher than elsewhere in Russia and even higher than in Poland.

Panorama of Kremlin Vologda


Climate data for Vologda
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 5.3
(42)
5.6
(42)
16.4
(62)
27.0
(81)
30.6
(87)
33.1
(92)
34.5
(94)
35.5
(96)
28.8
(84)
22.8
(73)
10.7
(51)
8.5
(47)
35.5
(96)
Average high °C (°F) -8.8
(16)
-7.1
(19)
-0.9
(30)
7.4
(45)
15.8
(60)
20.5
(69)
22.4
(72)
20.4
(69)
13.6
(56)
5.7
(42)
-1.3
(30)
-5.8
(22)
6.8
(44)
Average low °C (°F) -16.2
(3)
-15.2
(5)
-9.8
(14)
-1.6
(29)
4.5
(40)
9.3
(49)
11.4
(53)
9.9
(50)
5.1
(41)
-0.1
(32)
-6.4
(20)
-12.0
(10)
-1.8
(29)
Record low °C (°F) -47.1
(-53)
-43.2
(-46)
-34.6
(-30)
-25.6
(-14)
-9.1
(16)
-3.1
(26)
1.1
(34)
-1.4
(29)
-8.6
(17)
-19.6
(-3)
-32.8
(-27)
-45.2
(-49)
-47.1
(-53)
Precipitation mm (inches) 32
(1.26)
25
(0.98)
26
(1.02)
35
(1.38)
46
(1.81)
65
(2.56)
77
(3.03)
74
(2.91)
55
(2.17)
50
(1.97)
42
(1.65)
42
(1.65)
569
(22.4)
Source: Pogoda.ru.net[6] 8.09.2007

International relations

Advertisements

Twin towns — Sister cities

Vologda is twinned with:

Spaso-Prilutsky Monastery in the early 19th century.

References

  1. ^ Федеральная служба государственной статистики (Federal State Statistics Service) (2004-05-21). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек (Population of Russia, its federal districts, federal subjects, districts, urban localities, rural localities—administrative centers, and rural localities with population of over 3,000)" (in Russian). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002). Federal State Statistics Service. http://perepis2002.ru/ct/html/TOM_01_04_1.htm. Retrieved 2009-08-19. 
  2. ^ The value of density was calculated automatically by dividing the 2002 Census population by the area specified in the infobox. Please note that this value may not be accurate as the area specified in the infobox does not necessarily correspond to the area of the entity proper or is reported for the same year as the Census (2002).
  3. ^ Федеральная служба государственной статистики (Federal State Statistics Service) (2004-05-21). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек (Population of Russia, its federal districts, federal subjects, districts, urban localities, rural localities—administrative centers, and rural localities with population of over 3,000)" (in Russian). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002). Federal State Statistics Service. http://www.perepis2002.ru/ct/doc/1_TOM_01_04.xls. Retrieved 2008-07-25. 
  4. ^ Sergey Solovyov, History of Russia from the Earliest Times, Vol. 8.
  5. ^ A Brief History of Vologda
  6. ^ "Pogoda.ru.net" (in Russian). http://pogoda.ru.net/climate/27037.htm. Retrieved September 8 2007. 

Bibliography

  • Brumfield, William. Vologda Album (Moscow: Tri Kvadrata, 2005) ISBN 5946070509 (in English and in Russian)

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Vologda (Во́логда, [1]) is a city in Northwestern Russia.

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

There is more than one meaning of Vologda discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia. We are planning to let all links go to the correct meaning directly, but for now you will have to search it out from the list below by yourself. If you want to change the link that led you here yourself, it would be appreciated.


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology

Vologda takes its name, of likely Finno-Ugrian origin, from the Vologda River which flows through the city.

Proper noun

Singular
Vologda

Plural
-

Vologda

  1. a city in Russia, administrative centre of Vologda oblast.

Translations


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message