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Volos
Βόλος
The port of Volos by night
The port of Volos by night
Location
Volos is located in Greece
Volos
Coordinates 39°22′N 22°56′E / 39.367°N 22.933°E / 39.367; 22.933Coordinates: 39°22′N 22°56′E / 39.367°N 22.933°E / 39.367; 22.933
Government
Country: Greece
Periphery: Thessaly
Prefecture: Magnesia
Mayor: Alexandros Voulgaris
Population statistics (as of 2001[1])
City
 - Population: 82,439
 - Area: 27.678 km2 (11 sq mi)
 - Density: 2,979 /km2 (7,714 /sq mi)
Other
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 0 - 5 m (0 - 16 ft)
Postal: 38x xx
Telephone: 24210
Auto: ΒΟx
Website
www.volos-city.gr

Volos (Greek: Βόλος) is a coastal port city situated at the center of the Greek mainland, about 326 km north from Athens and 215 km south from Thessaloniki. It is the capital of the Magnesia prefecture.

Contents

Overview

Built at the innermost point of the Pagasetic Gulf and at the foot of Mount Pilio or Pelion (the land of the Centaurs), Volos is the only outlet towards the sea from Thessaly, the country's largest agricultural region. With a population of around 200,000, it is an important industrial centre, while its port provides a bridge between Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Volos is the third of Greece's major commercial ports, but also gains significant traffic because of its connection by ferry and hydrofoil with the nearby Sporades Islands, which include Skiathos, Skopelos and Alonissos. There are also connections to Limnos, Lesvos, Chios and Skyros.

Volos is the newest of the Greek port cities, with a remarkably large proportion of modern buildings, erected in the wake of the catastrophic earthquakes of 1955, and including the municipalities of Volos, Nea Ionia and Iolkos, as well as smaller suburban communities. The economy of the city is based on manufacturing, trade, services and tourism, and with its improved infrastructure the city is increasingly dynamic. Home to the University of Thessaly, one of the most important in country, the city also offers a wide range of facilities for the organisation of conferences, exhibitions and major cultural and scientific events, together with international-standard sporting amenities.

Volos participated in the Olympic Games, and as an Olympic City it helped to present a new face of contemporary Greece to a world audience. The city has also since played host to a succession of athletic events, such as the European Athletic Championships. It will host the 2013 Mediterranean Games.[2]

History

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Antiquity

Modern Volos is built on the area of the ancient cities of Demetrias, Pagasae and Iolkos. Demetrias was established by Demetrius Poliorcetes, King of Macedon. Iolkos, Iolcos or Iolcus, was the homeland of mythological hero Jason, who boarded the ship Argo accompanied by the Argonauts and sailed in quest of the Golden Fleece to Colchis. To the west of Volos lie the Neolithic settlements of Dimini, with a ruined acropolis, walls, and two beehive tombs dating to between 4000-1200 BC, Sesklo, with the remains of the oldest acropolis in Greece (6000 BC), and also the foundations of a palace and mansions, among its most characteristic examples of Neolithic civilisation.

Byzantine era

According to a Byzantine historian of the 14th century, Volos was known as "Golos". The most widely accepted theory for the derivation of the city's name suggests that Volos is a corruption of the Mycenaean Iolkos, which had become distorted through the ages to become "Golkos", later "Golos", and subsequently "Volos". Others contend that the name originates with Folos, who according to myth was a wealthy landlord of the region.

Ottoman era

It was a south border of Vilayet-i Rumeli-i Şarki (Eastern Rumelia Province) in Ottoman Empire.

Ottoman Macedonia

The Ottomans did not keep Volos as an administrative unit: since 1864 parts of geographical Macedonia lay in three vilayets, which also comprised some non-Macedonian areas. Northern Macedonia was part of the Kosovo vilayet and then of Skopje; the Thessaloniki (south Macedonia), and the Monastir (Central Macedonia) vilayet were also created. This administrative division lasted until 1912–13, when Macedonia was divided among the Balkan states.[3]

Modern history of Volos

Since the early stages of the Greek Revolution, the provisional government of Greece claimed Volos as part of Greek national territory, but the Treaty of Constantinople (1832), which established a Greek independent state, set its northern boundary between Arta and Volos.[4] When the Ottoman Empire started breaking apart, Macedonia was claimed by all members of the Balkan League (Serbia, Montenegro, Greece and Bulgaria), and by Romania. Under the Treaty of San Stefano that ended the Russo-Turkish War, 1877–78 the entire region, except Thessaloniki, was included in the borders of Bulgaria, but after the Congress of Berlin in 1878 the region was returned to the Ottoman Empire. The armies of the Balkan League advanced and occupied Macedonia in the First Balkan War in 1912. Because of disagreements between the allies about the partition of the region, the Second Balkan War erupted, and in its aftermath the arbitrary region of Macedonia was split into the following entities, that existed or still exist in this region:

  • Macedonia (as a contemporary sovereign state) refersN-[3] to the conventional short form name of the Republic of Macedonia, which held a referendum and established its independence from Yugoslavia on 8 September 1991.[7]

Modern Volos

Volos' promenade
The church of St.Costantine

Volos is a relatively new city, beginning its strongest growth in the mid 19th century where an insignificant Turkish hamlet used to lie. According to local evidence, the modern town was first established in 1841. One of its first known inhabitants was an Epirote, Nicolaos Gatsos; according to travellers of the time he laid the foundation stone for its first house. The locality of its castle was named Golos by Ottomans and locals, while Ano Volos was known as Gkolos, although some historians suggest Kastria of Volos. In 1830 Koumas referred to it as Iolkos; others also referred to it as Nea Demetrias, after ancient Demetrias.

In 1858 the town had just 80 houses, most of which lay along the waterfront, approximately where Iasonos Street can be found today. After its incorporation into Greece from the Ottoman Empire in 1881, the town had a population of only 4,900, but grew rapidly in the next four decades as merchants, businessmen, craftsmen and sailors gravitated toward it from the surrounding area. In the 1920s a large influx of refugees to the settlement took place, especially from Ionia, but also from Pontus, Cappadocia and Eastern Thrace. In 1882, Andreas Syngros established the Privileged Bank of Epirus and Thessaly, which the National Bank of Greece acquired in 1899 after its founder's death.

In its 1920 census, Volos recorded 30,046 inhabitants, but by the 1928 census the figure had grown to 47,892. In fact, Volos had a total population of 41,706, with the refugees of the "Asia Minor Catastrophe" comprising 6,779 of these (16.25%). In the Nea Ionia district, the total population was 6,186, and the refugees 5,166 (83.51%). Overall, the total number of refugees in the Municipality of Pagasses (Volos and Nea Ionia) numbered 11,945, of which refugees accounted for 25%.

The development of the city was closely bound up with the establishment of its industrial estate, the upgrading of the port, and the growth of tourism, due to the city's location near the scenic Mt. Pelion, the home of Chiron the Centaur and the beautiful beaches of the Magnesia prefecture, particularly those of the Northern Sporades. The city has been linked with a number of significant social movements in the past, such as the early teaching of Dimotiki, by Delmouzos in the early 20th century (when Katharevousa was the officially sanctioned version). Volos is also well known for its assortment of mezedes and a clear, alcoholic beverage known as tsipouro.

A street in a sister city, Rostov-on-Don, bears the name Улица Греческого Города Волос (Street of the Greek City of Volos), weaving through a picturesque mix of early 20th century century buildings with characteristic inner yards, tiered balconies and open iron stairs that lend the old Rostov its characteristic Mediterranean look.

Regional relations

An ongoing rivalry between Volos and the city of Larissa is tangible. A common joke to be heard in Volos may be: "What is the most noteworthy monument in Larissa? The road sign indicating the way to Volos...". The city prides itself on being a more cultured and pleasant place to live than its nearby counterpart.

Geography

Volos, which is the administrative centre of Magnesia prefecture, comprises three major municipalities: Volos, Nea Ionia and Iolkos. The geoographical coordinates of Volos are as follows: its latitude is 39°21'38.83"N, and its longitude stands at 22°56'57.26"E. Many of the city domains are separated through natural barricades, such as rivers.

Three main rivers/mountain torrents all rise from mount Pelion (1651m), crossing the city to create a unique urban geography, before ending in the Pagasetic Gulf flowing west. The Anavros river, famous for Jason's pass, divides Nea Demetriada district from the rest of the urban area. Krausidonas is the major river passing through the city, and constitutes the natural lung of the urbanized area of Volos, as well as the boundary between the major municipalities of the metropolitan city, the municipalities of Volos and Nea Ionia. Xirias (Ξηριάς), is the largest torrent of the metropolitan urban area of Volos, and passes through the Nea Ionia municipal area.

Of great importance for the biological diversity of the area, and the preservation of its climate, is the swamp of Bourboulithra, a wide aquatic ecosystem located west of the city center at Neapoli district. The main feature of this wetland is the apparent rarity of its survival in a densely populated urban area and among port facilities, and its significant level of biodiversity, with over 100 species observed by the established watch post of the Ecological Initiative of Magnesia. Today as the port expands, a new threat rises for the river delta at the northern point of the Pagasetic Gulf, affecting the richness of its flora and fauna.

The city boundary at its south-eastern corner is considered one of the main foothills of Mount Pelion, the hill of Goritsa, which separates the city from Agria. The paleolithic settlement at its higher reaches is a centre for recreational activities.

Climate

Climate graph of Volos

Volos, as a Mediterranean city, experiences a typical climate of neither particularly high nor extremely low temperatures throughout the year. Its climate is one of a low humidity favourable for all kinds of activities. The Pelion mountain, with its microclimatic conditions, affects the city's weather; the graph below illustrates Volos' climactic climatic conditions.

Natural disasters

As Greece lies in an earthquake zone, Volos cannot be excluded. A number of earthquakes have left their imprint in various domains of the city's life from urban planning to residential house design. The most well-known and devastating took place in 1954-1955, nearly demolishing the entire city including all its historic neoclassical buildings. Later that same year, a flood came to completely destroy what had been talked of until then as the urban miracle of modern Greece.

The city of Volos was flooded on October 10, 2006, in one of the prefecture's worst recorded floods; the inundation devastated crops, groves and many homes. A railroad bridge connecting Volos and Larissa collapsed when the central stone support was ruined by a combination of rocks, mud and debris carried by a swollen river, and almost one fifth of the city faced severe mudslides.

Urban plan

Architecture

The architectural and urban setting of Volos is characterised by its grid of squares and streets, its sense of neighbourhood, its imposing neoclassical buildings, the aged industrial edifices, a number of green oases, and most obviously by the proximity of sea and harbour. These elements in combination lend Volos its atmosphere and distinctiveness, making up one of the most beautiful Greek cities. The current urban plan of Volos was largely established in 1882, shortly after the liberation of the city, and was greatly influenced by concepts of neoclassical town planning. The plan connected the two city-centers (The Castle and Nea Magazia) along a simple axis; it was, however, somewhat limited given the full development possibilities of the city. The arrival of its refugees in 1922 and the earthquakes of 1955 gave Volos its present form.

Nea Magazia

Nea Magazia began construction in 1841, on the basis of a geometrically designed plan. Characteristic of this plan are the road axes lying parallel to the shore, along which developed shops and dwellings, and its central road axes today are Dimitriados street, Iasonos Street, K. Kartali Street, Iolkou Street and Ermou street.

Neoclassical buildings

The development of the new city coincided with the flourishing of neoclassicism. Public buildings conformed to this style and prestigious private buildings belonging to prosperous merchants were particularly sophisticated. Typical examples include:

  • The 3-storeyed Hotel de France, with its impressive decorative murals (1894, Iasonos and K. Kartali Street)
  • The National Bank, formerly the Epirothessalian Bank(1895)
  • The Athens Bank (1903, today the library of University of Thessaly)
  • The Achilllopouleion Hospital (1901)
  • The Archaeological Museum of Volos, Athanasakeio (1909)
  • The Agricultural Bank (1909, formerly the Kosmadopoulos Bank)
  • The Cinetheater Achillion, (1925)
  • The Aegli Hotel, (1927), designed by Kassiopoulos
  • The Building of the Air-force High officials Club near Agios Konstantinos Park, believed to have been designed by Le Corbusier
  • The Bank of Greece (1935)
  • The Averofeian courts of Justice
  • The family houses of Kartalis, Glavanis, Kastemis, Saratsis
  • The Sarafopoulos Mansion (1927), today the Volos Club
  • The well preserved Regas house and its singular decorative murals, today the Lyceum of Greek women.

Industrial buildings

Volos' factories and tobacco warehouses constitute striking architectural examples of the industrial acme of the city toward the latter years of the 19th century, and particularly of the first half of the 20th century. Mainly centred on the railway and the harbour, but also within the fabric of the city, their construction and design was often undertaken by well-known architects and engineers from around Europe. Many survive to this day following restoration and changes of function: outstanding among them are the Stamatopoulos engine-works(1883), the Glavani-Kazazi factory (1896), the Papageorgiou textile workshop (1905), the Mortzoukou textile workshop (1908), the Adamopoulos cotton industry plant (1908, today a gymnasium), the Papagianopoulos steel works (1909), the Volos Electricity Company Plant (dating to 1911 and today the musical and theatrical centre of Volos), the Tsalapatas brickworks factory (1925, today the National museum of Industrial Archeology), the Etmektzoglou silkworks (1926, today the Silk Museum), the Spirer Tobacco warehouse (1926 home of the Drury University Center), the Styxnokarpos Factory (1929), the Papastratos Tobacco warehouse, and the Matsangos Tobacco warehouse, amongst many.

Nea Ionia Refugee settlement

The history of Nea Ionia, Magnesia, is linked with the Asia Minor disaster, the torching of Smyrna and the displacement of 2,000,000 Greeks and Turks from their often affluent ancestral homes. In late February 1924 refugee houses were erected on the arid land of Xirokambos; these were known as Tetragona, or Squares, and formed the Volos refugee settlement. In the summer of 1925 the first houses were complete, called Tsimedenia, and built at the west end of the central square, whilst some years later the Petrina appeared further west. Together with the Tzamaliotica and Germanica houses at the east they make up the atmosphere of the settlement tangible today. Many of these structures still present their original appearance, while others have been partially rebuilt with new functions (municipal uses). There are plans to rebuild the area around the central square to incorporate wider uses than those of the present day.

Demographics

Volos is a relatively new city, and according to local statistics, its growth was substantially launched in 1881 when the area became part of the former Greek Kingdom. At this time the city had a population of around 4,000, mostly distributed around the old castle city (Palaia District today). Over the following century the city multiplied its population, reaching an overall population of approximately 200,000, including both permanent and temporary citizens, as well as university students.

A large proportion of the population (today, around 34% of the total) derives from the refugee population, established in the area in 1924, while another population group, comprising almost 30%, are the internal immigrants of Thessaly, whose consolidation began in 1890 and reached its peak in the late 1970s. The remaining population is mainly from Pelion and Almyros county, as well as from elsewhere in Greece. A significant number of inhabitants from elsewhere in Europe have also lived and continue to live in the city.

The city represents a fully urbanized Greek city with a large population in tertiary employment; 52%; 42% in secondary and less than 6% in primary employment. Volos today attracts more than 65% of Magnesia's perfectural population.

Historical population

Year Population Change Metropolitan population
1981 71,378 - 103,000
1991 77,192 +5,814/+8.14% 120,000
2001 82,439 +5,247/+6.79% 150,000

Economy

Volos is one of the most industrialized provincial cities of Greece, due to its strategic location between the largest population centers of the country (Athens - Thessaloníki) and its port. Industry is intensely specialized in steel production and manufacturing, and METKA has two large factories in the industrial area of Volos, while large factories of SIDENOR - a steel producer - operate in close proximity from the nearby city of Almyros. Hellenic Steel industry (Ελληνική Χαλυβουργία) also has production facilities in Volos, and AGET - Hraklis, a member of the Lafarge group, operates one of the largest cement facilities in the world (with capacity exceeding 7.000.000tn[8]) with its own private port, next to the city. Volos is also active in the research sector, hosting the CERETETH.

International consulates

The city of Volos has always had a major role in the financial, economic, commercial and administrative matters of the region of Thessaly and Central Greece, due to the strategic position of the city's port, unique between Athens and Thessaloniki. As a result, a considerable level of investment has taken place, with several investors then cultivating a sustained relationship with the city. Several European countries have found it worthwhile to establish consulates in Volos in support of those investments; today the city hosts seven consulates, including:

  • Italy Italy
  • France France
  • Belgium Belgium
  • Germany Germany
  • Denmark Denmark
  • Netherlands Netherlands

Culture

Giorgio de Chirico (1888-1978) was born in Volos

People

Ancient

Middle Ages

  • Mustafa Ağa Ottoman bey

Modern

Sports

Professional clubs

Water sport teams

  • OEA NAB
  • NOBA
  • OYK
  • IOVATH

Other clubs

Museums and galleries

Transportation

All land transportation reaches Volos, while the International Airport of Central Greece in Nea Anchialos links the city to international destinations, and the Port of Volos provides links to the islands, mostly the Sporades, as well as to some destinations in Pilio.

Motorways

Volos is linked through Greece's E75 Highway Axis (most often known as PATHE) with Northern and Southern Greece. Beyond this, the Axis E65 will be the gateway to Western Greece and the port of Igoumenitsa, through the plains of inner Thessaly; this part of the E65 motorway will be completed by 2012.

Airport

The city of Volos, along with the rest of Central Greece, is linked to the rest of Greece and Europe by the brand new International Airport of Central Greece, in Nea Anchialos. The airport represents the biggest air lane in Greece after Eleftherios Venizelos, with a capacity of 1,500 passengers per hour and facilities for almost 100 aircraft.

Railway

Ottoman arcitecture Volos railway station in 2005.

Volos' railway station building was built by Evaristo De Chirico soon after the liberation of Central Greece. Part of the station still functions in this picturesque 1884 structure, reminiscent to some of a stately home. The adjacent neoclassical building, built between 1900 and 1903 under Evaristo De Chirico, served as the administrative headquarters of the Thessaly Railways.

Today, the city is served by direct lines to the rest of Greece, and the railway complex houses facilities for train maintenance. Volos is directly linked with Athens once per day, with Thessaloniki twice per day, and with Larissa 15 times a day. In the past Volos was served by railway lines of three different gauges, the metre gauge line of Thessaly Railways to Kalampaka, the standard gauge line to Larissa and the 600 mm line to Pelion. Remnants of triple gauge lines still exist near the station.

International relations

Twin towns — Sister cities

Volos is twinned with:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Δείτε τη Διοικητική Διαίρεση" (in Greek). Hellenic Interior Ministry. www.ypes.gr. http://www.ypes.gr/UserFiles/f0ff9297-f516-40ff-a70e-eca84e2ec9b9/D_diairesi.xls. Retrieved 2009-09-09.  
  2. ^ "Greece to host 2013 Mediterranean Games". ANA-MPA (www.ana.gr). 2007-10-28. http://www.ana.gr/anaweb/user/showplain?maindoc=5829736&maindocimg=2023297&service=100. Retrieved 2007-10-28.  
  3. ^ Rossos, Andrew (2008). "Land and People in the Crossroads". Macedonia and the Macedonians. Hoover Press. p. 67. ISBN 0-817-94882-1.  ; Miller, William (1936). The Ottoman empire and its successors. Cambridge [Eng.]: The University Press. pp. 9, 447–49.  
  4. ^ Comstock, John (1829). History of the Greek Revolution. New York: W. W. Reed & co.. p. 5.  
  5. ^ Poulton, Hugh (2000). "Greece". Who Are the Macedonians?. Indiana University Press. pp. 85–86. ISBN 0-253-21359-2.  
  6. ^ PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Library of Congress Country Studies. "The Library of Congress, Country Studies". Yugoslavia. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/yutoc.html. Retrieved 17 July 006.  
  7. ^ Poulton, Who Are the Macedonians, p. 14.
  8. ^ "AGET Hraklis Facilities". http://www.aget.gr/aget/prod_unitsen.htm.  
  9. ^ vagelis tsekeris. "Archaeological Museum of Volos". Travelinfo.gr. http://www.travelinfo.gr/magnesia/museum.htm. Retrieved 2009-07-27.  
  10. ^ "ΜΟΥΣΕΙΟ ΠΟΛΗΣ - Σχεδιασμός". www.i-politismos.gr. http://www.i-politismos.gr/city_mus_sx.html. Retrieved 2009-07-27.  
  11. ^ "::: Piraeus Bank Group Cultural Foundation :::". Piop.gr. http://www.piop.gr/%2828562359A4EA8AA44354699C471E87862A5FAF94A85535FE%29/eCportal.asp?ID=405&NT=105&Lang=2. Retrieved 2009-07-27.  

External links


Volos
Βόλος
Location

Volos
Coordinates 39°22′N 22°56′E / 39.367°N 22.933°E / 39.367; 22.933Coordinates: 39°22′N 22°56′E / 39.367°N 22.933°E / 39.367; 22.933
Government
Country:Greece
Periphery: Thessaly
Prefecture: Magnesia
Mayor: Alexandros Voulgaris
Population statistics (as of 2001[1])
City
 - Population: 82,439
 - Area: 27.678 km2 (11 sq mi)
 - Density: 2,979 /km2 (7,714 /sq mi)
Other
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 0 - 5 m ­(0 - 16 ft)
Postal: 38x xx
Telephone: 24210
Auto: ΒΟx
Website
www.volos-city.gr

Volos (Greek: Βόλος) is a coastal port city in Thessaly situated midway on the Greek mainland, about 326 km north from Athens and 215 km south from Thessaloniki. It is the capital of the Magnesia prefecture.

Contents

Overview

Built at the innermost point of the Pagasetic Gulf and at the foot of Mount Pilio or Pelion (the land of the Centaurs), Volos is the only outlet towards the sea from Thessaly, the country's largest agricultural region. With a population of around 200,000, it is an important industrial centre, while its port provides a bridge between Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Volos is the third of Greece's major commercial ports, but also gains significant traffic because of its connection by ferry and hydrofoil with the nearby Sporades Islands, which include Skiathos, Skopelos and Alonissos. There are also connections to Limnos, Lesvos, Chios and Skyros.

Volos is the newest of the Greek port cities, with a remarkably large proportion of modern buildings, erected in the wake of the catastrophic earthquakes of 1955, and including the municipalities of Volos, Nea Ionia and Iolkos, as well as smaller suburban communities. The economy of the city is based on manufacturing, trade, services and tourism, and with its improved infrastructure the city is increasingly dynamic. Home to the University of Thessaly, one of the most important in the country, the city also offers a wide range of facilities for the organisation of conferences, exhibitions and major cultural and scientific events, together with international-standard sporting amenities.

Volos participated in the Olympic Games, and as an Olympic City it helped to present a new face of contemporary Greece to a world audience. The city has also since played host to a succession of athletic events, such as the European Athletic Championships. It will host the 2013 Mediterranean Games.[2]

History

Antiquity

Modern Volos is built on the area of the ancient cities of Demetrias, Pagasae and Iolcos. Demetrias was established by Demetrius Poliorcetes, King of Macedon. Iolkos, Iolcos or Iolcus, was the homeland of mythological hero Jason, who boarded the ship Argo accompanied by the Argonauts and sailed in quest of the Golden Fleece to Colchis. To the west of Volos lie the Neolithic settlements of Dimini, with a ruined acropolis, walls, and two beehive tombs dating to between 4000-1200 BC, Sesklo, with the remains of the oldest acropolis in Greece (6000 BC), and also the foundations of a palace and mansions[clarification needed], among its most characteristic examples of Neolithic civilisation.

Byzantine era

According to a Byzantine historian of the 14th century, Volos was known as "Golos". The most widely accepted theory for the derivation of the city's name suggests that Volos is a corruption of the Mycenaean Iolkos, which had become distorted through the ages to become "Golkos", later "Golos", and subsequently "Volos". Others contend that the name originates with Folos, who according to myth was a wealthy landlord of the region.

Ottoman era

It was a south border of Vilayet-i Rumeli-i Şarki in the Ottoman Empire as "Golos". Since the early stages of the Greek Revolution, the provisional government of Greece claimed Volos as part of Greek national territory, but the Treaty of Constantinople (1832), which established a Greek independent state, set its northern boundary between Arta and Volos.[3]

Modern Volos

File:Volanakis Constantine Port of
The port of Volos by Constantine Volanakis (1837–1907).

[[File:|thumb|Volos' promenade.]]

File:07Volos
The church of Saints Constantine and Helen.

Volos is a relatively new city, beginning its strongest growth in the mid 19th century where an insignificant Turkish hamlet used to lie. According to local evidence, the modern town was first established in 1841. One of its first known inhabitants was an Epirote, Nicolaos Gatsos; according to travellers of the time he laid the foundation stone for its first house. The locality of its castle was named Golos by Ottomans and locals, while Ano Volos was known as Gkolos, although some historians suggest Kastria of Volos. In 1830 Koumas referred to it as Iolkos; others also referred to it as Nea Demetrias, after ancient Demetrias.

In 1858 the town had just 80 houses, most of which lay along the waterfront, approximately where Iasonos Street can be found today. After its incorporation into Greece from the Ottoman Empire in 1881, the town had a population of only 4,900, but grew rapidly in the next four decades as merchants, businessmen, craftsmen and sailors gravitated toward it from the surrounding area. In the 1920s a large influx of refugees to the settlement took place, especially from Ionia, but also from Pontus, Cappadocia and Eastern Thrace. In 1882, Andreas Syngros established the Privileged Bank of Epirus and Thessaly, which the National Bank of Greece acquired in 1899 after its founder's death. Volos was occupied by Ottomans in 8 May, 1897 during Greco Turkish War. This occupation was lasted 5 months.

In its 1920 census, Volos recorded 30,046 inhabitants, but by the 1928 census the figure had grown to 47,892. In fact, Volos had a total population of 41,706, with the refugees of the "Asia Minor Catastrophe" comprising 6,779 of these (16.25%). In the Nea Ionia district, the total population was 6,186, and the refugees 5,166 (83.51%). Overall, the total number of refugees in the Municipality of Pagasses (Volos and Nea Ionia) numbered 11,945, of which refugees accounted for 25%.

The development of the city was closely bound up with the establishment of its industrial estate, the upgrading of the port, and the growth of tourism, due to the city's location near the scenic Mt. Pelion, the home of Chiron the Centaur and the beautiful beaches of the Magnesia prefecture, particularly those of the Northern Sporades. The city has been linked with a number of significant social movements in the past, such as the early teaching of Dimotiki, by Delmouzos in the early 20th century (when Katharevousa was the officially sanctioned version). Volos is also well known for its assortment of mezedes and a clear, alcoholic beverage known as tsipouro.

A street in a sister city, Rostov-on-Don, bears the name Улица Греческого Города Волос (Street of the Greek City of Volos), weaving through a picturesque mix of early 20th century century buildings with characteristic inner yards, tiered balconies and open iron stairs that lend the old Rostov its characteristic Mediterranean look.

Geography

[[File:|thumb|View of the city from mount Pelion]] Volos, which is the administrative centre of Magnesia prefecture, comprises three major municipalities: Volos, Nea Ionia and Iolkos. The geoographical coordinates of Volos are as follows: its latitude is 39°21'38.83"N, and its longitude stands at 22°56'57.26"E. Many of the city domains are separated through natural barricades, such as rivers.

Three main rivers/mountain torrents all rise from mount Pelion (1651m), crossing the city to create a unique urban geography, before ending in the Pagasetic Gulf flowing west. The Anavros river, famous for Jason's pass, divides Nea Demetriada district from the rest of the urban area. Krausidonas is the major river passing through the city, and constitutes the natural lung of the urbanized area of Volos, as well as the boundary between the major municipalities of the metropolitan city, the municipalities of Volos and Nea Ionia. Xirias (Ξηριάς), is the largest torrent of the metropolitan urban area of Volos, and passes through the Nea Ionia municipal area.

Of great importance for the biological diversity of the area, and the preservation of its climate, is the swamp of Bourboulithra, a wide aquatic ecosystem located west of the city center at Neapoli district. The main feature of this wetland is the apparent rarity of its survival in a densely populated urban area and among port facilities, and its significant level of biodiversity, with over 100 species observed by the established watch post of the Ecological Initiative of Magnesia. Today as the port expands, a new threat rises for the river delta at the northern point of the Pagasetic Gulf, affecting the richness of its flora and fauna.

The city boundary at its south-eastern corner is considered one of the main foothills of Mount Pelion, the hill of Goritsa, which separates the city from Agria. The paleolithic settlement at its higher reaches is a centre for recreational activities.

Climate

Volos, as a Mediterranean city, experiences a typical climate of neither particularly high nor extremely low temperatures throughout the year. Its climate is one of a low humidity favourable for all kinds of activities. The Pelion mountain, with its microclimatic conditions, affects the city's weather; the graph below illustrates Volos' climactic climatic conditions.

Natural disasters

As Greece lies in an earthquake zone, Volos cannot be excluded. A number of earthquakes have left their imprint in various domains of the city's life from urban planning to residential house design. The most well-known and devastating took place in 1954-1955, nearly demolishing the entire city including all its historic neoclassical buildings. Later that same year, a flood came to completely destroy what had been talked of until then as the urban miracle of modern Greece.

The city of Volos was flooded on October 10, 2006, in one of the prefecture's worst recorded floods; the inundation devastated crops, groves and many homes. A railroad bridge connecting Volos and Larissa collapsed when the central stone support was ruined by a combination of rocks, mud and debris carried by a swollen river, and almost one fifth of the city faced severe mudslides.

Urban plan

Architecture

The architectural and urban setting of Volos is characterised by its grid of squares and streets, its sense of neighbourhood, its imposing neoclassical buildings, the aged industrial edifices, a number of green oases, and most obviously by the proximity of sea and harbour. These elements in combination lend Volos its atmosphere and distinctiveness, making up one of the most beautiful Greek cities. The current urban plan of Volos was largely established in 1882, shortly after the liberation of the city, and was greatly influenced by concepts of neoclassical town planning. The plan connected the two city-centers (The Castle and Nea Magazia) along a simple axis; it was, however, somewhat limited given the full development possibilities of the city. The arrival of its refugees in 1922 and the earthquakes of 1955 gave Volos its present form.

Nea Magazia

Nea Magazia began construction in 1841, on the basis of a geometrically designed plan. Characteristic of this plan are the road axes lying parallel to the shore, along which developed shops and dwellings, and its central road axes today are Dimitriados street, Iasonos Street, K. Kartali Street, Iolkou Street and Ermou street.

Neoclassical buildings

The development of the new city coincided with the flourishing of neoclassicism. Public buildings conformed to this style and prestigious private buildings belonging to prosperous merchants were particularly sophisticated. Typical examples include:

  • The 3-storeyed Hotel de France, with its impressive decorative murals (1894, Iasonos and K. Kartali Street)
  • The National Bank, formerly the Epirothessalian Bank(1895)
  • The Athens Bank (1903, today the library of University of Thessaly)
  • The Achilllopouleion Hospital (1901)
  • The Archaeological Museum of Volos, Athanasakeio (1909)
  • The Agricultural Bank (1909, formerly the Kosmadopoulos Bank)
  • The Cinetheater Achillion, (1925)
  • The Aegli Hotel, (1927), designed by Kassiopoulos
  • The Building of the Air-force High officials Club near Agios Konstantinos Park, believed to have been designed by Le Corbusier
  • The Bank of Greece (1935)
  • The Averofeian courts of Justice
  • The family houses of Kartalis, Glavanis, Kastemis, Saratsis
  • The Sarafopoulos Mansion (1927), today the Volos Club
  • The well preserved Regas house and its singular decorative murals, today the Lyceum of Greek women.

Industrial buildings

Volos' factories and tobacco warehouses constitute striking architectural examples of the industrial acme of the city toward the latter years of the 19th century, and particularly of the first half of the 20th century. Mainly centred on the railway and the harbour, but also within the fabric of the city, their construction and design was often undertaken by well-known architects and engineers from around Europe. Many survive to this day following restoration and changes of function: outstanding among them are the Stamatopoulos engine-works(1883), the Glavani-Kazazi factory (1896), the Papageorgiou textile workshop (1905), the Mortzoukou textile workshop (1908), the Adamopoulos cotton industry plant (1908, today a gymnasium), the Papagianopoulos steel works (1909), the Volos Electricity Company Plant (dating to 1911 and today the musical and theatrical centre of Volos), the Tsalapatas brickworks factory (1925, today the National museum of Industrial Archeology), the Etmektzoglou silkworks (1926, today the Silk Museum), the Spirer Tobacco warehouse (1926 home of the Drury University Center), the Styxnokarpos Factory (1929), the Papastratos Tobacco warehouse, and the Matsangos Tobacco warehouse, amongst many.

Nea Ionia Refugee settlement

The history of Nea Ionia, Magnesia, is linked with the Asia Minor disaster, the torching of Smyrna and the displacement of 2,000,000 Greeks and Turks from their often affluent ancestral homes. In late February 1924 refugee houses were erected on the arid land of Xirokambos; these were known as Tetragona, or Squares, and formed the Volos refugee settlement. In the summer of 1925 the first houses were complete, called Tsimedenia, and built at the west end of the central square, whilst some years later the Petrina appeared further west. Together with the Tzamaliotica and Germanica houses at the east they make up the atmosphere of the settlement tangible today. Many of these structures still present their original appearance, while others have been partially rebuilt with new functions (municipal uses). There are plans to rebuild the area around the central square to incorporate wider uses than those of the present day.

Demographics

Volos is a relatively new city, and according to local statistics, its growth was substantially launched in 1881 when the area became part of the former Greek Kingdom. At this time the city had a population of around 4,000, mostly distributed around the old castle city (Palaia District today). Over the following century the city multiplied its population, reaching an overall population of approximately 200,000, including both permanent and temporary citizens, as well as university students.

A large proportion of the population (today, around 34% of the total) derives from the refugee population, established in the area in 1924, while another population group, comprising almost 30%, are the internal immigrants of Thessaly, whose consolidation began in 1890 and reached its peak in the late 1970s. The remaining population is mainly from Pelion and Almyros county, as well as from elsewhere in Greece. A significant number of inhabitants from elsewhere in Europe have also lived and continue to live in the city.

The city represents a fully urbanized Greek city with a large population in tertiary employment; 52%; 42% in secondary and less than 6% in primary employment. Volos today attracts more than 65% of Magnesia's perfectural population.

Historical population

Year Town population Metropolitan population
1981 71,378 103,000
1991 77,192 120,000
2001 82,439 150,000

Economy

Volos is one of the most industrialized provincial cities of Greece, due to its strategic location between the largest population centers of the country (Athens - Thessaloníki) and its port. Industry is intensely specialized in steel production and manufacturing, and METKA has two large factories in the industrial area of Volos, while large factories of SIDENOR - a steel producer - operate in close proximity from the nearby city of Almyros. Hellenic Steel industry (Ελληνική Χαλυβουργία) also has production facilities in Volos, and AGET - Hraklis, a member of the Lafarge group, operates one of the largest cement facilities in the world (with capacity exceeding 7,000,000tn[4]) with its own private port, next to the city. Volos is also active in the research sector, hosting the CERETETH.

International consulates

The city of Volos has always had a major role in the financial, economic, commercial and administrative matters of the region of Thessaly and Central Greece, due to the strategic position of the city's port, unique between Athens and Thessaloniki. As a result, a considerable level of investment has taken place, with several investors then cultivating a sustained relationship with the city. Several European countries have found it worthwhile to establish consulates in Volos in support of those investments; today the city hosts seven consulates, including:

Culture

People

(1888-1978) was born in Volos.]]

Ancient

Modern

Sports

Professional clubs

Water sport teams

  • OEA NAB
  • NOBA
  • OYK
  • IOVATH

Other clubs

Museums and galleries

.]]

Transportation

All land transportation reaches Volos, while the International Airport of Central Greece in Nea Anchialos links the city to international destinations, and the Port of Volos provides links to the islands, mostly the Sporades, as well as to some destinations in Pilio.

Motorways

Volos is linked through Greece's E75 Highway Axis (most often known as PATHE) with Northern and Southern Greece. Beyond this, the Axis E65 will be the gateway to Western Greece and the port of Igoumenitsa, through the plains of inner Thessaly; this part of the E65 motorway will be completed by 2012.

Airport

The city of Volos, along with the rest of Central Greece, is linked to the rest of Greece and Europe by the brand new International Airport of Central Greece, in Nea Anchialos. The airport represents the biggest air lane in Greece after Eleftherios Venizelos, with a capacity of 800 passengers per hour and facilities for almost 10 aircraft.

Volos is the first city in Europe to feature Seaplane Services through Argo Airways, which is based in Volos. The seaplanes connect Volos with Skiathos, Skopelos, Allonisos, Athens and Thessaloniki.

Railway

Volos' railway station building was built by Evaristo De Chirico soon after the liberation of Central Greece. Part of the station still functions in this picturesque 1884 structure, reminiscent to some of a stately home. The adjacent neoclassical building, built between 1900 and 1903 under Evaristo De Chirico, served as the administrative headquarters of the Thessaly Railways.

Today, the city is served by direct lines to the rest of Greece, and the railway complex houses facilities for train maintenance. Volos is directly linked with Athens once per day, with Thessaloniki twice per day, and with Larissa 15 times a day. In the past Volos was served by railway lines of three different gauges, the metre gauge line of Thessaly Railways to Kalampaka, the standard gauge line to Larissa and the 600 mm line to Pelion. Remnants of triple gauge lines still exist near the station.

International relations

Twin towns — Sister cities

Volos is twinned with:

See also

References

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Panoramic view of Volos waterfront area
Panoramic view of Volos waterfront area

Volos (Greek: Βόλος) (Population: 123,815 (2001)) is the 5th biggest city (and 3d largest port) in Greece, situated in Thessaly, almost in the middle of the distance between Athens (326 km) and Thessaloniki (219 km).

Understand

History

Modern Volos is built on the area of the ancient cities of Demetrias, Pagasae and Iolkos. Iolkos was the homeland of ancient Greek hero Jason who boarded the ship Argo accompanied by the Argonauts and sailed in the quest for the Golden Fleece to Colchis. Demetrias was established by Demetrius Poliorcetes, King of Macedonia, in 293/92 BC. In 197 BC Romans annexed Demetrias.

To the west of Volos there are the Neolithic settlements of Dimini with a ruined acropolis, walls and two beehive tombs dated between 4000-1200 BC and Sesklo with the remains of the oldest acropolis in Greece (6000 BC), as well as the foundations of a palace and mansions, among the most typical examples of Neolithic civilisation.

During Byzantine empire, emperor Justinian I in 551 fortified Palea hill. In 1423 Ottomans annexed Volos. Volos during the Ottoman empire was a hamlet, build on the hill in Palea district. The hill was fortified with walls. Today just a few parts of the walls can be seen near the Tsalapata building.

After its annexation to Greece from the Ottoman Empire in 1881, it had a population of only 4,900 but rapidly grew within the next 4 decades. Houses were built outside the walls and the main area of Volos by the sea was built up. Merchants, businessmen, craftsmen and sailors moved to Volos from the surrounding area. In the 1920s there was a large influx of refugees in Volos, especially from Ionia, but also from Pontus, Cappadocia and Eastern Thrace. In the 1920 census, Volos had 30,046 inhabitants but according to the 1928 census, its population had grown to 47,892.

Climate

Volos, unlike other towns in Thessalian plain, enjoys a mild mediterranean climate with can-be-hot-but-bearable summers (though a little bit humid) and mild winters. Spring and Autumn are the best to visit the city itself, Winter is the time to be on the Pelion mountain villages, and Summer definitely dedicated to the numerous beaches of the region on Pagasetic gulf and the Aegean Sea.

Being privileged to be situated on the foothills of Mount Pelion, the mythical mountain of the centaurs, and bounded by Goritsa Hill to the Southeast, Volos sports a nice weather all year long, with the sea and mountain breezes dominant in all city areas.

Olympic Games

Volos was one of the 4 cities in Greece, other than Athens, where Olympic venues where constructed for the olympic football tournament. Apart from the flashy 22,000 seats "Panthessaliko Stadium" that was built in the district of Nea Ionia, there have been constructed some new roads (like a ring road to the city, making access to Pelion easier for travellers coming from E75 Athens or Thessaloniki) plus a facelift of the waterfront and the city inner districts.

Other athletic events

Approximately 2 years after the Olympic Games, Volos is the first Greek city to host a major sport event on an international level; The Men&Women, Juniors and Seniors Artistic Gymnastics European Championship 2006. The Games took place at Nea Ionia Sport Complex, and particularly at the Indoor Swimming Hall, which was specially transformed for this cause. There was a major works' scheme in the city, with renovation and enlargement of hotels etc, in order to be able to host the Games.

The Artistic Gymnastics Games took place between the end of April and the beginning of May 2006.

Volos, together with neighbouring city of Larisa have filed a common candidacy bid for organizing the Mediterranean Games of 2013 [1].

Get in

By plane

Volos airport [2] (VOL) is situated in (Nea Anchialos), about 30 km SW from the city, and currently operates mostly weekly charter flights during the summer, directly from Amsterdam, the UK and Germany.

Air Berlin will operate every Monday and every Friday from 1 May 2009 to 09 October 2009 (Flights to/from Berlin, Hamburg, Dusseldorf, Nuremberg, Vienna).

There are expansion projects of the airport underway, as well as a rail connection from Volos city to the airport, so as to be able to start some commercial routes as well.

At this moment there is no regular bus connection from the airport to Volos or Pelion. The buses available at Volos airport meet only travellers of scheduled charter flights to transfer them to their accommodation, booked through a travelling agency. Other travellers can take a taxi from the airport, or travel by rental car.

Another way to arrive in Volos from abroad by plane is to land to the nearby island of Skiathos [3] (offering domestic and international flights, charter and commercial ones) and then take the ferry (about 3 hours) or the hydrofoil (about 1 hour) to Volos.

By regional coach

Interurban coaches ("KTEL" buses) (KTEL Volou (site in Greek)) are by far the most convenient way to travel around Greece, as well as for intra-regional travelling. There is frequent bus service from Athens Liossion Station to Volos about 15 times a day (cost is about €20), as well as from Thessaloniki bus terminal "Macedonia" to Volos about 10 times a day (about € 12). Volos is also connected with daily direct routes to Patras, Ioannina, Larissa, Trikala, Karditsa and to many more places in continental Greece via Larissa. Interurban Bus Terminal is opposite to "Volos info center" near the City Hall, the Railway Station and the Port, on a major hub.

By train

Trains (OSE) connect Volos to other cities in Greece via Larisa. Travelling with ordinary trains can be cheaper, although a little bit slower, whereas choosing a fancy faster Intercity train will cost the same amount of money, or even more than a KTEL bus.

By Ferry

There are ferry services to Skiathos, Skopelos and Alonissos.

Get around

By bus

There is an efficient public transport system with 12 bus lines going around the city (ticket price about 1€), detailed info in the regional bus terminal (called "Astiko KTEL"), directly adjacent to the Interurban Bus Terminal ("Yperastiko KTEL").

By taxi

Taxis in Volos, as everywhere in Greece are comparably cheap. You should not pay more than € 3 if you hail a cab (silver colour) on the road to take you anywhere in the city. Note that taxi meters have two rates - rate 1 applies from 5am till midnight, and rate 2, the double rate, from midnight to 5am. Taxi fare fraud is not widespread but it still happens, so make sure the rate is correct. If you feel you have been overcharged, ask for a receipt (they are obliged to give one) and take the plate number, then phone the tourist police to report the driver on 171. Expect to pay € 1 or € 2 extra if you take a taxi from the bus station, the train station or the port, and a surcharge if you call for a taxi service on demand.

Volos tourist office

Volos tourist office has plenty of usufull informations about Volos, plus a free town map, a free Volos travel guide and many more. Volos tourist office is located opposite the bus station in Palea district.

  • The Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum of Volos 1 Athanasaki Str., Τ.Κ. 38001, Volos telephone: +30 24210 25285 fax: +30 24210 28563 email: protocol@igepka.culture.gr, open Tuesday - Sunday: 08:30 - 15:00, admission full: €2, reduced: €1; for free admission days see web site [[4]], is one of the best smaller museums in Greece and should on no account be missed.
  • At first glance, Volos City Center doesn't seem particularly interesting for the traveller, but a walk in the town streets might change your first idea. Ermou street is a long paved road parallel to the promenade, Argonafton str, offering a wide variety of shops for any taste, plus a selection of "hidden" bars and cafes, especially around St.Nikolaos Square, the city cathedral, dedicated to patron saint of the sailors, St. Nicholas. There is a seaside park between the university "Papastratos building" and "Agios Konstantinos" church on the promenade. Anavros Park starts directly behind Agios Konstantinos and extends to the east all the way till Anavros beach, an open municipal strand, offering clearwater to the swimmer during the summer (and winter for the brave).
  • For those that have a car, there is also Alykes municipal beach, a 5-minute-drive from the center to the southwest, in the more easygoing Alykes district of Volos, having cafes and bars offering sunbeds on the sand during late at night, where you can enjoy your cocktail and take a swim as well. The municipal beach in Alykes has an entrance fee of € 1 during the day, offering a lifeguard, showering facilities, clothes-changing chambers and a beach bar. You can easily go to Alykes with city bus (blue bus) number 6 from the city hall.
  • El. Venizelou str., commonly known as "Iolkou" street among the locals, as well as "K.Kartali str." are vertical to the promenade and Ermou street heading north. A ten minute walk from the port through the center will bring you to Plateia Eleftherias, ie "Freedom Square", sporting some cafes. There are plans of renovating the massive Matsaggos building and arcade on Iolkou street, formerly a tobacco industry, to use it as a new landmark for the industrial past of the city, on the planned "Plateia Panepistimiou" or "University Square" which is under construction.
  • If you visit Volos you'll most definitely take the opportunity to visit the close mountain villages of Portaria and Makrynitsa, offering you a splendid specimen of the renowned traditional architecture of the Pelion mansions. The city view from Makrynitsa is magnificent.
  • In case you wander a little bit to the inner districts of the city, you will see Nea Ionia on the Northwest of the center, once a refugee camp after the disposal of the Greeks in Asia Minor after 1922, but nowadays a bustling developing city part, still offering an enormous park called Helikodromio with an open theatre inside. it can be reached with blue buses 1 and 2.

Architecture

Volos hasn't been lucky to preserve the large number of neoclassical buildings that could be spotted almost everywhere, as a sign of its industrial boom in the early twentieth century. Unfortunately, a devastating series of earthquakes in 1955 destroyed many parts of the old town. The architectural and urban-planning character of Volos is achieved by the layouts of streets and squares. The current urban plan of Volos was fundamentally formed in 1882, shortly after the liberation of the city and was much influenced by concepts of neoclassical town planning. Modern city isn't really interesting architecturally, apart from "Achilleion" cinema on the promenade, Volos railway station (officially described as one of the most beautiful in Greece from Hellenic Railways, once a departure point for the nowadays touristic "Pelion train") and the churches of Aghios Nikolaos (cathedral) and Aghios Konstantinos (basilica, on the promenade). Former brick factory "Tsalapatas" renovated in a museum and leisure area with taverns, bars etc. The University of Thessaly, has preserved a series of old industrial warehouses and other buildings in various places in the city, to use them as academic faculties today, "Papastratos building" on the promenade, originally a greek tobacco company warehouse is the administration building of the university and could be thought as the trademark of Volos. Some typical examples of Neoclassical buildings are: The 3-storeyed Hotel de France, with its impressive decorative murals (1894, Iasonos and K. Kartali streets), The National Bank, formerly the Epirothessalian Bank(1895), The Athens Bank (1903, today the library of University of Thessaly), The Achilllopouleion Hospital (1901), The Archaeological Museum of Volos, Athanasakeio (1909), The Agricultural Bank (1909, formerly the Kosmadopoulos Bank), The Cinetheater Achillion, (1925), The Aegli Hotel, (1927), designed by Kassiopoulos, The Building of the Air-force High officials Club near Agios Konstantinos Park, believed that it was designed by Le Corbusier, The Bank of Greece (1935), The Averofeian courts of Justice, The well preserved Regas house and its singular decorative murals, today the Lyceum of Greek women.

Do

Cinemas

Films shown in original language with Greek subtitles. Cartoons are often translated to Greek.

  • Village cinemas [5], Gianitson (Γιαννιτσών) 29, Tel: 8011009191, 2108108080. Has 4 halls, so you can choose between 4 films.
  • Lido [6], K. Kartali (Κ. Καρτάλη), Tel: 2421024311. Has 2 halls, so you can choose between 2 films.
  • Metaksourgio (Greek: Μεταξουργείο) [7], every Friday at 21:30, 2.00€. Art movies.
  • Achillion (Greek: Αχίλλειον) on Iasonos street.

Drink

Winter bars, pubs and clubs, usually close down during summer. Most of them have a different facility for the summer, usually by the sea.

  • Cafe Santan, Ogl Str., [8]. Rock Bar, one of the most famous bars in Volos. Has been around for more than 25 years and is known for its place in the Greek Rock History as most of the famous Greek rock singers have sometime played there. Live music every Tuesday.  edit
  • PocoPico. Tiny budget choice. Beer 2.5€, Spirits 4-5€.  edit
  • Posh, Papakyriazi (Παπακυριαζή) 38, Palea district. Electronic music. Beer 5€, Spirits 7€.  edit
  • Balthassar, , center. Huge variety of beers. Beer from 4€ to 12€, Spirits 7€.  edit
  • Mystique, in Valis Resort, [9]. excellent summer choice which gathers many people from Volos. Summer hotspot.  edit
  • Spitaki, Ogl (Όγλ), center. Rock music. Beer 5€, Spirits 7€.  edit

Summer only

Downtown choices are:

  • Liogerma (Λιόγερμα). Close to Agios Konstantinos church. Spacious, nice sea and Volos view. Beer 4€, Spirits 7€.  edit

Other choices are:

  • Anemos (Άνεμος). in Soutrali, Agria 5km from Volos. Small venue, on a jetty with lovely view of Volos. Beer 3€, Spirits 6€.  edit
  • Layal. in Soutrali, Agria 5km from Volos. Beer 5€, Spirits 7.5€-8.5€.  edit
  • Rivera. in Kato Gatzea 15km from Volos. A little far from Volos, but excellent summer choice which gathers many people from Volos. Open all day, by the sea, popular for swimming also. There is a dinner section. Beer 4€, Spirits 7€.  edit

Buy

There many shops along Ermou street.

English books can be bought at Public and Papasotiriou (Παπασωτηρίου), both in the center.

Tsipouradika

Volos specializes in "Tsipouradika" (Greek Τσιπουράδικα) (also called "Ouzeri" (Greek Ουζερί)) where ("Tsipouro") (local Greek spirit) is served with a huge variety of tidbits. There are plenty of "tsipouradika" along the waterfront near the port. Cheaper choices can be found in Nea Ionia area.

The choices for eating are Tsipouradika (Τσιπουράδικα or Ουζερί) where seafood is served, Taverns (Ταβέρνα) where mostly meat dishes are served, Restaurants (Εστιατόριο) where Greek dishes can be found (there are Italian and Chinese restaurants also), Psistaries (Ψησταριά) (Grill houses) where the main dish is grilled meat, Fast Food choices are local Souvlatzidika (Οβελιστήριο or Σουβλατζίδικο) where souvlaki is served, and typical fast food chains such as Goody's and Everest. Souvlatzidika is the cheapest option if you are on a budget.

People in Greece usually eats late in the evening (21:00 - 24:00), during the day most Taverns, Psistaries and Restaurants are closed. However, Tsipouradika and Fast Food restaurants are open all day long.

Restaurants (Εστιατόριο) and Taverns (Ταβέρνα)

Budget

  • Tsardakas (Τσαρδακάς) (Tavern), Kiprou str (Κύπρου).  edit
  • Giannakos (Γιαννάκος) (Tavern), Epta Platanion (Επτά Πλατανίων), +30 2421028730. Small, Giannakos is very friendly.  edit

Mid range

  • Sogno di San (Italian restaurant), Ferron str (Φερρών), Palea district, +30 2421032690. Italian style pitsas and pasta. (Evening only)  edit

Splurge

  • La Marimba (Mexican restaurant), Nikotsara str (Νικοτσάρα), +30 2421071167, [10]. Romantic tone, has a wonderful courtyard with a lot of trees. One of the best mexican restaurants in Greece. Delicious foods, great drinks (try their margaritas, or caipirinhas and mojitos). Have to book ahead during peak hours (21:00 - 23:00) (Evening only)- Closed on Monday  edit

Tsipouradika (Τσιπουράδικα or Ουζερί)

Most of tsiouradika have a fixed price for tsipouro with tidbit, the price may vary from 3€ - 3,5€ per 25cl, usually it's the same price in every tsipouradiko. The difference in price comes when ordering extra dishes. Tidbit vary from tsipouradiko to tsipouradiko also, some serve one tidbit per 25cl, while some in the center serve one tidbit per 50cl of tsipouro. Tsipouro is served in open bottles or closed bottles of 25cl, bottled is 0,5€ more expensive but the standard quality may be worth it.

  • Volos (Βόλος) (Tsipouradiko), Argonafton str (Αργοναυτών). Seafood. At the waterfront. 25cl tsipouro with tidbit 3€, 25cl bottled tsipouro with tidbit 3,5€, serves 3 tidbits per 4x25cl.  edit
  • Papadis (Παπαδής) (Tsipouradiko), Argonafton str (Αργοναυτών). Seafood. At the waterfront. 25cl tsipouro with tidbit 3€, 25cl bottled tsipouro with tidbit 3,5€, serves 3 tidbits per 4x25cl.  edit

Psistaries (Ψησταριά) (Grill houses)

Psistaries serve mostly meat, salads and french fries. The meat usually is ordered by weight, and the price is per kilo also. One portion is 330gr of grilled meat.

Sleep

There are many hotels in Volos. Most are in center near the sea. Car parking could be hard to find in the center of Volos.

  • Avra hotel.  edit
  • Park hotel, Deligiorgi str. (Δεληγιώργη), [11].  edit
  • Xenia hotel, Plastira str. (Πλαστήρα), [12].  edit
  • Volos Palace, Xenofontos & Thrakon Streets (Behind city hall, near waterfront and train station), +30 24210 76501, [13]. Very nice new hotel with breakfast buffet, bar and restaurant. Modern, comfortable rooms (half with sea view). Ballroom and conference rooms available for conventions, wedding receptions, special events. Helpful staff -- most speak English.  edit
  • Valis Resort, Pelion Street & Democratias Avenue (At the city end, on the waterfront, 5.5km from the city centre), +30 24280 97260 (fax: +30 24280 97260), [14]. New luxurious hotel with three restaurants at the sea front, two bars and spa. Modern, comfortable rooms (half with sea view, half with pelion view). Ballroom and conference rooms available for conventions, wedding receptions, special events. Parking.  edit

Get out

Mount Pelion is close to Volos. It can easily be reached by bus or car.

Sporades Islands are famous during summer. Ferries and hydrofoils connects Volos Port with the islands. Valis Resort, Pelion Street & Democratias Avenue (At the city end, on the waterfront, 5.5km from the city centre), +30 24280 97260, [15].  edit

Consulates

Volos is home to a few consulates:

  • Consulate of Belgium:
  • Consulate of Denmark:
  • Consulate of France:
  • Consulate of the Germany: Leoforos Dimitriados St. 251, Tel.: +30-24210-25379
  • Consulate of Italy:
  • Vice consulate of The Netherlands: +30 24210-37714
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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
Volos

Plural
-

Volos

  1. A city in Greece.

Translations

  • French: Vólos
  • Greek: Βόλος

See also


Simple English

Volos is a Greek city. It is located in the center of Greece, in district of Thessalia. Its population is 85,000 people but its population with its suburb is over 115,000 people. The major suburb of Volos is Nea Ionia which it is located in the north-west of Volos. Volos is built next to Pilio mountain. It is a coastal city and has a big harbor. Volos' Harbor connects Volos with Sporades islands and other places. Near Volos are found the ancient Greek towns, Iolkos, Dimitrias and Pagases. Volos is built at the same place with Pagases. The hero Jason was from Iolkos. Today Volos is an industrial town.

Sister cities


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