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WBHJ
WBHJ.JPG
City of license Midfield, Alabama
Broadcast area Birmingham, Alabama
Branding 95.7 Jamz
Slogan "Birmingham's #1 for Hip-Hop and R&B", "Bangin' 95 Minutes of Music All the Time"
Frequency 95.7 MHz (also on HD Radio)
First air date 1958
Format Urban Contemporary Hit Radio
ERP 12,000 watts
HAAT 306 meters
Class C2
Facility ID 730
Callsign meaning W BirmingHam's Jamz[1]
Former callsigns WTBC-FM (1958-?)
WUOA {?-1984)
WFFX {1984-1996)[2]
Owner Cox Broadcasting
(Cox Radio, Inc.)
Sister stations WAGG, WBHK, WBPT, WNCB, WENN, WZZK
Webcast Listen Live
Website http://957jamz.com/

WBHJ (95.7 FM, "95.7 Jamz") is an Urban-formatted radio station that serves Birmingham, Alabama. In 2005, it also began broadcasting in IBOC digital radio, using the HD Radio system from iBiquity. It is owned by Cox Radio Holdings along with six other stations in the market.[3] Its transmitter is located atop Red Mountain in Birmingham.

Contents

History

95.7 originally came on the air in 1958 as WTBC-FM, a Tuscaloosa station that was a companion to WTBC (AM) "News/Talk 1230" with transmitter on 15th Street. As WTBC-FM, the station was just a placeholder for the AM station, playing a stack of MOR format LP's on a turntable. A contributor who worked at WTBC-AM notes that when the stack of records was finished, it just started playing over! Station IDs weren't done regularly because they were done by the often-forgetful AM jocks. The program director would go live for a few hours each night and was probably the only live person on the air daily. It later became WUOA (University of Alabama), an adult contemporary-formatted college radio station. Another change occurred in 1984 with the calls switching to WFFX, "95.7 the Fox", and the addition of modern rock.[2]

It then moved into the Birmingham market in the 1990s, and was during that period the transmitter moved to a taller tower near Vance. On July 15, 1996, the calls were changed to WBHJ and the format of the station to "95.7 Jamz", an Urban-formatted radio station that disguises as a rhythmic.[2]

In November 2004, after years of being plagued by an inadequate signal into its primary listening area of Birmingham, the station applied for a construction permit to FCC to move its transmitter from Vance to Red Mountain. In June 2005 the station completed a move to boost its signal in the Birmingham market by getting relicensed to the Birmingham suburb of Midfield and moving its transmitter site from rural Bibb County (near Vance) to Red Mountain, where the other high-power Birmingham stations are located. Although the move required a reduction in power from 100 kilowatts to just 12.2 kilowatts, the move has provided a strong signal to listeners in the immediate market area.

Station management

  • General Manager: David DuBose
  • Program Director: Mary K
  • Music Director: Homie

References

  1. ^ Nelson, Bob (2008-10-18). "Call Letter Origins". The Broadcast Archive. http://nelson.oldradio.com/origins.call-list.html. Retrieved 2008-10-31.  
  2. ^ a b c "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/cdbs/pubacc/prod/call_hist.pl?Facility_id=730&Callsign=WBHJ.  
  3. ^ Ekman, Jennifer (September 1, 2006). "Cox rocks Birmingham". Birmingham Business Journal. http://baltimore.bizjournals.com/birmingham/stories/2006/09/04/focus1.html.  

External links

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