The Full Wiki

More info on WEAZ

WEAZ: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to WPOZ article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

WPOZ
City of license Union Park, Florida
Broadcast area Central Florida
Branding Z88.3
Slogan Safe For The Little Ears
Frequency 88.3 MHz (also on HD Radio)
Repeaters (see article)
Format Contemporary Christian music
HD2-Christian Rap/Hip-Hop
HD3-Christian Rock (The Rock)
ERP 13,000 watts[1] (currently building a new tower to broadcast at 100,000 watts)
HAAT 404 meters
Class C2
Facility ID 9876
Callsign meaning POZitive Hits (sic)
Owner Central Florida Educational Foundation, Inc.
Website http://www.zradio.com

WPOZ (88.3 FM, "Positive Hits Z88.3") is a radio station near Orlando, Florida which broadcasts contemporary Christian music. WPOZ is one of the most successful contemporary Christian music stations in the United States in terms of ratings and appealing to female listeners in the 25-54 age demographic (the demographic most courted by advertisers).

Other frequencies

Besides broadcasting on 88.3 MHz, this station also broadcasts on other frequencies in different areas of Central Florida, including:

WPOZ and WMYZ also broadcast in HD Radio.

WPOZ also holds a construction permit for a new full-powered satellite, WHYZ 91.1 MHz in Palm Coast, Florida.

In late-2008, WPOZ was granted authorization from the FCC to increase its signal strength to 100,000 watts; this was accomplished when the Central Florida Educational Foundation acquired a station in Lecanto, Florida, WLMS, from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saint Petersburg. As that station also broadcasted on 88.3 FM, Central Florida Educational Foundation closed down WLMS, enabling WPOZ to increase its signal strength without interfering with that station. After the upgrade, WPOZ's main signal would sufficiently cover areas already served by its repeaters, making them redundant -- their future is currently unknown.

References

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message