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WNWR
Wnwr.png
City of license Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Broadcast area Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Branding New World Radio
Slogan The Multicultural Voice of the Delaware Valley
Frequency 1540 kHz AM
First air date 1960s
Format ethnic
Power 50,000 watts daytime
Class D
Facility ID 1027
Callsign meaning W New World Radio
Owner Global Radio LLC
Website www.wnwr.com

WNWR is a multicultural station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The station broadcasts at 1540 kHz on the AM dial. Its transmitters are located in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia.

The station broadcasts various foreign language programs such as China Drive from China Radio International from 7 a.m.–9 a.m., Chinese Radio New York from Monday to Friday 4 p.m.–5:30 p.m. in Cantonese, sports/books/politics/entertainment talk shows such as "The Adam Taxin Show" Tuesdays from 1 p.m.-2 p.m., and technology and community development programs with J.C. Lamkin, http://connectingblack.com/Memberprofile.aspx?memberID=1286, host of Technically Speaking, which airs on this station Saturdays at 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

History

The station was founded in the late 1940s as WJMJ, which broadcast middle-of-the-road music and religious programming. In the mid-1960s it was acquired by Rust Craft Greeting Cards, which changed the call sign to WRCP and in 1967 changed the format to country music. In 1981, after WFIL adopted a country format, WRCP switched to oldies. Later in the 1980s, the call sign was changed to WSNI to match a co-owned FM station; for a time, WSNI broadcast an all-Beatles-and-Motown format. Eventually a more conventional oldies mix returned and the station became WPGR ("Philly Gold Radio"), which it remained until becoming WNWR in the 1990s.

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