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WRC-TV
WRC-TV.png
Washington, D.C.
Branding NBC 4 (general)
News 4 (newscasts)
Slogan Washington's News Leader
Connected to You
Channels Digital: 48 (UHF)
Virtual: 4 (PSIP)
Subchannels (see article)
Affiliations NBC
Owner NBC Universal
(NBC Telemundo License Company)
First air date June 27, 1947
Call letters’ meaning Radio Corporation of America
(NBC's former parent)
Former callsigns WNBW (1947-1954)
Former channel number(s) Analog:
4 (VHF; 1947-2009)
Transmitter Power 813 kW
Height 242 m
Facility ID 47904
Transmitter Coordinates 38°56′24″N 77°4′54″W / 38.94°N 77.08167°W / 38.94; -77.08167
Website www.nbcwashington.com

WRC-TV, channel 4, is an owned and operated television station of the NBC television network, located in the American capital city of Washington, D.C.. The station's studios and transmitter are co-located in the Tenleytown neighborhood of northwest Washington.[1]

WRC-TV houses and originates NBC News' Washington bureau, out of which David Gregory, Chris Matthews, Jim Miklaszewski, Chuck Todd, Andrea Mitchell, Norah O'Donnell, Savannah Guthrie, David Shuster, and Pete Williams are based.

It also offers NBC Plus on digital channel 4.2 and Universal Sports on 4.3.

Contents

History

WRC-TV's studio/transmitter facility, which also houses NBC's Washington operations, have been in use since 1958. (Photo is from c. 1962.)

The station traces its roots to experimental W3XNB, which was put on the air by the Radio Corporation of America, the then-parent company of NBC, in 1939. On June 27, 1947, the station received a commercial license and went on the air as WNBW (for NBC Washington). It is Washington's second-oldest licensed television station, after WTTG (channel 5). WNBW was also the second of the five original NBC-owned television stations to sign-on, behind New York City and ahead of Chicago, Cleveland and Los Angeles.

On October 18, 1954, its callsign changed to the present WRC-TV to match its sister radio station WRC (980 AM, now WTEM) and WRC-FM (93.9 MHz, now WKYS), which reflected NBC's ownership at the time by RCA.

The 2nd presidential debate between candidates John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon was broadcast from the station's studios on October 7, 1960. David Brinkley's Washington segment of the Huntley-Brinkley Report originated at WRC-TV between 1956 and 1970.

The earliest color videotape in existence is a recording of the dedication of NBC/WRC's Washington studios on May 21, 1958. As Dwight D. Eisenhower spoke at the event, it was also the first time a president had been videotaped in color. [1]

WRC-TV is currently one of three network owned-and-operated stations in Washington, D. C., along with Fox Broadcasting Company's WTTG and MyNetworkTV's WDCA (channel 20) - both owned by News Corporation.

On January 14, 2009 WRC-TV and WTTG entered in talks to pool video and share their news helicopters. The agreement is similar to ones already made between other Fox and NBC O&Os in Chicago (WMAQ-TV and WFLD) and Philadelphia (WCAU and WTXF).[2]

WRC-TV is the only network affiliated station in the Washington Metropolitan Area that still broadcasts news in standard definition. However, they started broadcasting from a temporary set on February 8, 2010 while "upgrades" started on their main set.

Digital television

The station's digital channel is multiplexed:

Digital channels

PSIP Channel Programming
4.1 48.1 Main WRC-TV programming / NBC HD
4.2 48.2 NBC Plus
4.3 48.3 Universal Sports

On or before June 12, 2009, WRC-TV shut down its analog signal on channel 4 to complete its analog to digital conversion. Its digital signal remained on channel 48.[3] However, through the use of PSIP, digital television receivers will display WRC-TV's virtual channel as "4".

WRC-TV's studios were the home from 1996 to about 2002 of WHD-TV, an experimental high definition television station owned by a consortium of industry groups and stations which carried the nation's first program in the format transmitted by a television station, an episode of Meet the Press [4], and aired on Channel 34 to provide the FCC and the National Association of Broadcasters a channel to conduct many experiments in the new format [5][6]. WHD-TV was discontinued around 2002.

Programs

WRC-TV's studios are home to Meet the Press, the longest-running show in U.S. broadcast television history, which debuted on November 6, 1947 and It's Academic, which premiered in 1961 and is the longest running game show in television history according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Sam and Friends, Jim Henson's late-night precursor to Sesame Street and The Muppet Show, got its start on WRC-TV on May 9, 1955.

Because of its ownership by the network, WRC-TV generally clears the entire NBC schedule, though NBC Nightly News is broadcast a half-hour late (at 7 pm) to allow another 30 minutes of local news. WRC-TV was the over-the-air home of Washington Redskins pre-season games for the 2009 season, meaning that some or all of NBC's prime-time schedule was pre-empted by game coverage.

Notable personalities

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Current

News 4 anchors

  • Jim Vance - Weeknights @ 6pm & 11pm (1969-present)
  • Doreen Gentzler - Weeknights @ 6pm & 11pm also health reporter (1989-present)
  • Jim Handly - Weeknights @ 4pm & 5pm also Daily Connection Host
  • Wendy Rieger - Weeknights @ 5pm and Going Green reporter
  • Pat Lawson Muse - Weeknights @ 4pm and Reporter's Notebook & This Week host
  • Joe Krebs - Weekday morning anchor and Viewpoint host
  • Barbara Harrison - Midday Anchor and Wednesday's Child host
  • Craig Melvin - Weekend evening anchor
  • Eun Yang - Weekday morning
  • Kimberly Suiters - Weekend morning anchor
  • Aaron Gilchrest - Weekend morning anchor

News 4 reporters

  • Jackie Bensen - General assignment reporter
  • Julie Carey - General assignment reporter
  • Pat Collins - General assignment reporter
  • Elizabeth Crenshaw - Consumer reporter
  • Michael Flynn - General assignment reporter
  • Chris Gordon - Legal analyst/reporter; LawScope host
  • Steve Handelsman - General assignment reporter; national correspondent
  • Megan McGrath - General assignment reporter (daughter of WTTG's Patrick McGrath)
  • Tom Sherwood - Political reporter
  • Darcy Spencer - General assignment reporter
  • Derrick Ward - General assignment reporter
  • Jane Watrel - General assignment reporter; national correspondent
  • Tracee Wilkins - General assignment reporter
  • Brian Mooar- National Correspondent

Meteorologists

  • Veronica Johnson (AMS) - Meteorologist and America This Week host
  • Tom Kierein (AMS) - Morning Meteorologist
  • Chuck Bell (AMS) - Weekend Meteorologist
  • Justin Drabick (AMS Certified) - Fill-in Meteorologist also WBOC Meteorologist

Sports reporters

  • Lindsay Czarniak - Sports director seen at 6pm and 11pm and reporter and former Sports Machine co-host
  • Dan Hellie - Weekend sports anchor and reporter during the week Hellie Pad host
  • Hakem Dermish - Sports reporter and producer

Former personalities

  • James Adams - Weekend evening anchor/reporter (1997–2008)
  • Miguel Almaguer - General assignment reporter (2006–2009); now with NBC News as national correspondent, 2009.
  • Clay Anderson - Meteorologist (1999-2006)
  • Paul Anthony - Weekend weather anchor (1972–1979)
  • Mil Arcega - Weekend morning anchor/reporter (1998–2004)
  • Jess Atkinson - Sports anchor/reporter (1990–1996)
  • Morgan Beatty - Newscaster (1950s)
  • Neil Boggs - Anchor (1967–1972)
  • Shannon Bream - Weekend evening anchor/reporter (2004-2007)
  • Glenn Brenner - Sports (1970-1976) - deceased
  • Andrea Brody - Sports reporter; Sports Machine correspondent (2002–2007)
  • Campbell Brown - Reporter (1993–1996; formerly with NBC News; now with CNN)
  • Wally Bruckner - Sports anchor/reporter (1990–2006) Washingtonpost.com Article of Wally Bruckner exit from WRC-TV
  • John Buren - Sports anchor/reporter (1977–1978)
  • Kelly Burke - Reporter; Wednesday's Child host (1976–1987)
  • Cheryl Butler - Reporter (2005–2008)
  • Arch Campbell - Entertainment reporter (1974–2006)
  • Darrian Chapman - Sports reporter (1995–2000; deceased)
  • Nick Charles - Sports anchor/reporter (1976–1979; also at WJZ-TV Baltimore; 1st CNN sports anchor)
  • Scott Clark - Sports anchor (1980s; now with WABC-TV New York)
  • John Cochran - Reporter (early 1970s; now Capitol Hill correspondent at ABC News)
  • Richard L. Coe - Entertainment critic prior to Arch Campbell (1960s-1974; deceased)
  • Katie Couric - General assignment reporter (1987–1989; former NBC Today show co-host) - now Anchor, CBS Evening News
  • Dan Daniels - Sports commentator (late 60s/early 70s)
  • Steve Doocy - Features reporter (1983-1989)
  • Tony Dorsey - General assignment reporter (1998–2006)
  • Peter Ford - News anchor (1977–1990)
  • Frank Forrester - Weatherman (1960s)
  • Andy Fox - reporter (1981–1986)
  • Keith Garvin - Reporter/Anchor (?-2009); now at KTXA-TV in Dallas.
  • Robert Hager - Reporter (1960–1965; formerly an NBC News correspondent)
  • Mike Hambrick - Anchor (1981–1985)
  • Richard C. Harkness - News reporter/anchor (1940s–1960s)
  • Jim Hartz - Anchor (1976–1979)
  • I.J. Hudson - Technology reporter and anchor (1985–2007)
  • Andrew Humphrey - Meteorologist (1995–1998)
  • Charlayne Hunter-Gault - Reporter (1967–1968)
  • Debbi Jarvis - Anchor/reporter (1994–2003)
  • Dave Jones - Meteorologist (1991–2001)
  • Susan Kidd - Anchor (1983–2006)
  • Susan King - Coverage story anchor (1983–1987)
  • Bob Kur - Reporter (1973–1976)
  • Marty Levin - Anchor/reporter (1980–1982)
  • Lynda Lopez - Reporter (1986-1997)]
  • Shari Macias - Reporter (1994–2001)
  • Catherine "Cassie" Mackin - Anchor/reporter (1969-1972; deceased)
  • Suzanne Malveaux - Reporter (1996–1999)
  • Dave Marash - Anchor/reporter (1985–1989)
  • Bob McBride - Anchor/reporter (1982–1986)
  • Robert McCormick - Reporter/commentator (1960s; deceased)
  • Doug McKelway - Anchor/reporter (1992–2002)
  • George Michael - Sports anchor/reporter; former host of The George Michael Sports Machine (1980–March 25, 2007); hosted Monday segments from Redskins Park and Redskins Report/Full Court Press until December 2008[7] (deceased as of December 24, 2009)
  • Jeff Napshin - General assignment reporter (2004–2006)
  • Angela Owens - Reporter (1981–1984)
  • Bryson Rash - Original anchor (June 27, 1947–1960s; President of National Press Club in 1963; news director when WRC won a Peabody Award for its Home Rule coverage in 1973; deceased)
  • Glenn Rinker - Anchor (1969–1976; deceased)
  • Max Robinson - reporter (1967–1968; deceased)
  • Charlie Rose - Talk show host (1981–1984)
  • Tim Russert - Frequent correspondent from Meet the Press; deceased
  • Bob Ryan - AMS Certified Meteorologist (1980-2010)
  • Mary Alice Salinas - Anchor/reporter (1995–2005)
  • Willard Scott - NBC page (1950; Bozo the Clown from 1959–1962; meteorologist (1968–1980); now at NBC's Today Show)
  • Karen Shanor 1980s - Psychologist, Author; Hosted a call-in show, with guests, centered on psychology
  • Dave "The Mouth" Sheehan - Sports anchor prior to George Michael (1975–1980)
  • Maurice Siegel - Sports commentator (late 60s/early 70s; deceased)
  • Sue Simmons - Anchor/reporter (1976–1980)
  • Carole Simpson - Reporter/public affairs host (1977–1982)
  • Jim Simpson - Sports reporter (1960s)
  • Jill Sorenson - Sports reporter (2000–2004)
  • Joel A. Spivak - Anchor (1987–1988)
  • Greg Starddard - General assignment reporter (2003–2005)
  • Tippy Stringer - "Weather girl" (mid 1950s)
  • Henry Tenenbaum - Anchor (1981–1987; formerly of WUSA-TV)
  • Fred Thomas - Anchor/reporter (1975–1987)
  • Lea Thompson - Anchor/reporter (1985–1992)
  • Steve Villanueva - Weekend meteorologist (2006–2009)
  • Jim Upshaw - Reporter (1982–1992
  • Kathy Vara - Reporter (1992–1994
  • Linda Vester - Reporter (1992–1993; formerly with Fox News Channel)
  • Todd Whitthorne - Sports Anchor/Reporter (1986-1990)
  • Don Williams - Reporter (1989–1990)
  • Chikage Windler - Meteorologist (1998–2003

Former producers

  • Brenda Mallory - News4 at 5; now owns consulting firm
  • Faith Murphy - Former Web producer of NBC4.com; launched local msnbc.com site (1996)

News/station presentation

Newscast titles

  • Review of the News (1947-1952)
  • Texaco Headlines (1952-1962)
  • Big City News (1962-1966)
  • News 4 Washington (1966-1975)
  • The NewsCenter (1975-1977)
  • NewsCenter 4 (1977-1982)
  • Channel 4 News (1982-1987)
  • News 4 (1987-present)

Station slogans

  • Channel 4, Proud as a Peacock! (1979-1981; localized version of NBC campaign)
  • Channel 4, Our Pride is Showing (1981-1982; localized version of NBC campaign)
  • We're Channel 4, Just Watch Us Now (1982-1983; localized version of NBC campaign)
  • Channel 4 There, Be There (1983-1984; localized version of NBC campaign)
  • Channel 4, Let's All Be There (1984-1986; localized version of NBC campaign)
  • Come Home To Channel 4 (1986-1987; localized version of NBC campaign)
  • Come On Home To Channel 4 (1987-1988; localized version of NBC campaign)
  • Working for You (1987-present; news)
  • NBC4, Connected to You (2006-present; general)
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References

External links


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