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WXZO
WXZO logo
City of license Willsboro, New York
Broadcast area Champlain Valley
Branding 96.7 DOT-FM
Slogan The Legend is Back!
Frequency 96.7 MHz
First air date July 1996
Format Oldies
ERP 1,000 watts
HAAT 243 meters (797 ft)
Class A
Callsign meaning W X ZOne (previous format)
Former callsigns WWGT (1992-1996)
WXPS (1996-2001)
Affiliations The True Oldies Channel (Citadel Media)
Owner Vox Communications
(Vox AM/FM, LLC)
Sister stations WEAV, WTSJ, WCPV, WCVR, WVTK, WEZF
Website 967dotfm.com

WXZO is an English-language American radio station broadcasting an oldies format, located in Burlington, Vermont. (The station's city of license is actually Willsboro, New York, but its studios are in Colchester.)

Owned and operated by Vox Communications, it broadcasts on the FM band on 96.7 MHz with an effective radiated power of 1,000 watts (class A) using an omnidirectional antenna.

Contents

History

WXZO signed on in July 1996 with a modern rock format[1]; although the station conducted intermittent test operations in late June with this format under the call letters WWGT[2][3], the station ultimately went with the call letters WXPS on July 5, upon formally beginning operations[4]; the callsign reflected its "Pulse" branding.[2] Initially licensed to Vergennes, Vermont, WXPS's signal had trouble reaching Burlington[3], forcing the station to apply for a translator on 97.3 FM in late 1996[5]; after only a year, however, the station decided to drop the format, and following a brief silent period WXPS switched to sports talk.[6][7] Soon afterward, WXPS leased out WEAV (960) as a simulcast.[8]

Capstar Broadcasting purchased WXPS in 1998.[9] On December 14, the sports talk format, which by then also incorporated some hot talk programs, was abandoned in favor of country music; around the same time, WXPS moved its city of license and transmitter to Willsboro[10]. This move improved the station's Burlington signal[10], and the plans for the 97.3 translator were abandoned and the construction permit canceled two months earlier.[11] The following April, WEAV left the simulcast and implemented a separate talk format.[12] A year later, WXPS itself changed formats again, this time to smooth jazz.[13]

In April 2001, Clear Channel Communications, who acquired the station after a series of mergers, migrated the smooth jazz format to sister station WLCQ (92.1; now WVTK); upon the completion of this move, WXPS resumed simulcasting with WEAV, this time airing its talk format under the "Zone" branding and the current WXZO call letters.[14][15]

Clear Channel announced on November 16, 2006 that it would sell its Champlain Valley stations after being bought by private equity firms[16], resulting in a sale to Vox Communications in 2008.[17] On September 17, Vox again dissolved the simulcast with WEAV, and WXZO adopted the current oldies format, branding itself "96.7 DOT-FM" in reference to former local top 40 station WDOT (1390; now WCAT). (Despite this branding, the station continues to use the WXZO call letters, as WDOT is currently assigned to a relay of The Point.) The oldies format was previously heard on WVTK.[18]

Programming

Most of WXZO's weekday programming, as well as some weekend programming, is locally-originated, with air talent largely composed of former WDOT personalities.[18] The station also carries some syndicated programming, including First Light and Imus in the Morning, — both of which continue to be simulcast with WEAV — as well as Mike Harvey, American Top 40: The 70s, and some programming from Scott Shannon's The True Oldies Channel.

References

  1. ^ Fybush, Scott (July 31, 1996). "WXTK On the Move...". New England RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-960731.html. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Fybush, Scott (June 27, 1996). "KF2XBF Solved, etc.". New England RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-960627.html. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b Fybush, Scott (July 5, 1996). "WRKO Fun, and San Juan too!". New England RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-960705.html. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Call Sign History". CDBS Public Access. Federal Communications Commission. http://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/cdbs/pubacc/prod/call_hist.pl?Facility_id=36422&Callsign=WXZO. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  5. ^ Fybush, Scott (December 9, 1996). "New England RadioWatch". http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-961209.html. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  6. ^ Fybush, Scott (July 10, 1997). "On and Off the Air". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-970710.html. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  7. ^ Fybush, Scott (July 17, 1997). "Another Nail in Radio News' Coffin". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-970717.html. Retrieved January 31, 2010. 
  8. ^ Fybush, Scott (July 24, 1997). "Remembering Walt Dibble". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-970724.html. Retrieved January 31, 2010. 
  9. ^ Fybush, Scott (April 2, 1998). "The Big Get...Smaller". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-980402.html. Retrieved February 1, 2010. 
  10. ^ a b Fybush, Scott (December 18, 1998). "Vermont Heats Up". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-981218.html. Retrieved February 1, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Station Search Details (DW247AG)". CDBS Public Access. Federal Communications Commission. http://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/cdbs/pubacc/prod/sta_det.pl?Facility_id=84384. Retrieved February 1, 2010. 
  12. ^ Fybush, Scott (April 23, 1999). "WABY Goes All-News". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-990423.html. Retrieved February 1, 2010. 
  13. ^ Fybush, Scott (April 7, 2000). ""Quick," What's On 93.5/93.9?". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-000407.html. Retrieved February 1, 2010. 
  14. ^ Fybush, Scott (April 4, 2001). "Take Me Out to the Ban Game". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-010404.html. Retrieved February 2, 2010. 
  15. ^ Fybush, Scott (April 9, 2001). ""WWZN Stole the Celtics!"". North East RadioWatch. http://www.bostonradio.org/nerw/nerw-010409.html. Retrieved February 2, 2010. 
  16. ^ Fybush, Scott (November 20, 2006). "Dark Days All Around". NorthEast Radio Watch. http://www.fybush.com/NERW/2006/061120/nerw.html. Retrieved February 2, 2010. 
  17. ^ Fybush, Scott (January 7, 2008). "Entercom/Nassau WEEI Deal is Dead". NorthEast Radio Watch. http://www.fybush.com/NERW/2008/080107/nerw.html. Retrieved February 2, 2010. 
  18. ^ a b Fybush, Scott (September 22, 2008). "Lobel's Radio Days". NorthEast Radio Watch. http://www.fybush.com/NERW/2008/080922/nerw.html. Retrieved February 2, 2010. 

External links


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