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The New York Stock Exchange as seen from Wall Street

Wall Street is a street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA. It runs east from Broadway to South Street on the East River, through the historical center of the Financial District. It is the first permanent home of the New York Stock Exchange; over time Wall Street became the name of the surrounding geographic neighborhood.[1] Wall Street is also shorthand (or a metonym) for the "influential financial interests" of the American financial industry, which is centered in the New York City area.[2]

Several major U.S. stock and other exchanges remain headquartered on Wall Street and in the Financial District, including the NYSE, NASDAQ, AMEX, NYMEX, and NYBOT.

Contents

History

View of Wall Street from corner of Broad Street, 1867: The building on the left was the U.S. Customs House. Today it's the home of the Federal Hall National Memorial.

The name of the street derives from the 17th century when Wall Street formed the northern boundary of the New Amsterdam settlement. In the 1640s basic picket and plank fences denoted plots and residences in the colony.[3] Later, on behalf of the Dutch West India Company, Peter Stuyvesant, in part using African slaves,[4] led the Dutch in the construction of a stronger stockade. A strengthened 12-foot (4 m) wall[5] against attack from various Native American tribes. In 1685 surveyors laid out Wall Street along the lines of the original stockade.[5] The wall was dismantled by the British colonial government in 1699. In the late 18th century, there was a buttonwood tree at the foot of Wall Street under which traders and speculators would gather to trade informally. In 1792, the traders formalized their association with the Buttonwood Agreement. This was the origin of the New York Stock Exchange.[6]

In 1789, Federal Hall and Wall Street was the scene of the United States' first presidential inauguration. George Washington took the oath of office on the balcony of Federal Hall overlooking Wall Street on April 30, 1789. This was also the location of the passing of the Bill Of Rights.

In 1889, the original stock report, Customers' Afternoon Letter, became the The Wall Street Journal, named in reference to the actual street, it is now an influential international daily business newspaper published in New York City.[7] For many years, it had the widest circulation of any newspaper in the United States, although it is currently second to USA Today.[8] It has been owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. since 2007.

Decline and revitalization

The Manhattan Financial District is one of the largest business districts in the United States, and second in New York City only to Midtown. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the corporate culture of New York was a primary center for the construction of skyscrapers (rivaled only by Chicago). The Financial District, even today, actually makes up a distinct skyline of its own, separate from but not soaring to quite the same heights as its midtown counterpart a few miles to the north.

September 16, 1920: a bomb exploded in front of the headquarters of J.P. Morgan Inc. at 23 Wall Street, killing 38 and injuring 300 people. Federal Hall (26 Wall Street), with its statue of George Washington, is shown on the right.

Built in 1914, 23 Wall Street was known as the "House of Morgan" and for decades the bank's headquarters was the most important address in American finance. At noon, on September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded in front of the bank, killing 38 and injuring 300. Shortly before the bomb went off a warning note was placed in a mailbox at the corner of Cedar Street and Broadway. While theories abound about who was behind the Wall Street bombing and why they did it, after twenty years investigating the matter, the FBI rendered the file inactive in 1940 without ever finding the perpetrators. The explosion did, however, help fuel the Red Scare that was underway at the time.

A crowd gathers at the intersection of Wall and Broad streets after the 1929 crash. The New York Stock Exchange (18 Broad Street) is on the right. The majority of people are congregating in Wall Street on the left between the "House of Morgan" (23 Wall Street) and Federal Hall (26 Wall Street).

The stock market crash of 1929 ushered in the Great Depression. During this era, development of the financial district stagnated. Construction of the World Trade Center was one of the few major projects undertaken during the last three quarters of the 20th century and, financially, it was not originally as successful as planned. Some point to the fact that it was actually a government-funded project, constructed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey with the intention of spurring economic development downtown. All the tools necessary for international trade were to be housed in the complex. However, at the beginning, much of the space remained vacant.

Nonetheless, some large and powerful firms did purchase space in the World Trade Center. Further, it attracted other powerful businesses to the immediate neighborhood. In some ways, it could be argued that the World Trade Center changed the nexus of the Financial District from Wall Street to the Trade Center complex. When the World Trade Center was destroyed in the September 11, 2001 attacks, it left somewhat of an architectural void as new developments since the 1970s had played off the complex aesthetically. The attacks, however, contributed to the loss of business on Wall Street, due to temporary-to-permanent relocation to New Jersey and further decentralization with establishments transferred to cities like Chicago, Denver, and Boston.

Wall Street itself and the Financial District as a whole are crowded with highrises by any measure. Further, the loss of the World Trade Center has actually spurred development in the Financial District on a scale that hadn't been seen in decades. This is in part due to tax incentives provided by the federal, state and local governments to encourage development. A new World Trade Center complex, centered on Daniel Liebeskind's Memory Foundations plan, is in the early stages of development and one building has already been replaced. The centerpiece to this plan is the 1,776-foot (541 m) tall 1 World Trade Center (formerly known as the Freedom Tower). New residential buildings are already sprouting up, and buildings that were previously office space are being converted to residential units, also benefiting from the tax incentives. Better access to the Financial District is planned in the form of a new commuter rail station and a new downtown transportation center centered on Fulton Street. If you look at the building on the left, you will see that it is most likely modeled after the Greek Parthenon.[9]

Buildings

Federal Hall, Wall Street.

Wall Street's architecture is generally rooted in the Gilded Age, though there are also some art deco influences in the neighborhood. Landmark buildings on Wall Street include Federal Hall, 14 Wall Street (Bankers Trust Company Building), 40 Wall Street (The Trump Building), and the New York Stock Exchange at the corner of Broad Street.

Personalities

Over the years, certain elite persons associated with Wall Street have become famous. Although their reputations are usually limited to members of the stock brokerage and banking communities, several have gained national and international fame. Some earned their fame for their investment strategies, financing, reporting, legal or regulatory skills, while others are remembered for their greed. One of the most iconic representations of the market prosperity is the Charging Bull sculpture, by Arturo Di Modica. Representing the bull market economy, the sculpture was originally placed in front of the New York Stock Exchange, and subsequently moved to its current location in Bowling Green.

Wall Street's culture is often criticized as being rigid. This is a decades-old stereotype stemming from the Wall Street establishment's protection of its interests, and the link to the WASP establishment. More recent criticism has centered on structural problems and lack of a desire to change well-established habits. Wall Street's establishment resists government oversight and regulation. At the same time, New York City has a reputation as a very bureaucratic city, which makes entry into the neighborhood difficult or even impossible for middle class entrepreneurs.

The ethnic background of Wall Streeters remains largely unchanged since the days of the railway barons of the early 1900s, as documented by their portraits in the Wall+Broad chapter of The Corners Project [10]

Cultural influence

Wall Street vs. Main Street

Not just a metonym, Wall Street has a sign post.

As a figure of speech contrasted to "Main Street," the term "Wall Street" can refer to big business interests against those of small business and the working of middle class. It is sometimes used more specifically to refer to research analysts, shareholders, and financial institutions such as investment banks. Whereas "Main Street" conjures up images of locally owned businesses and banks. While the phrase "Wall Street" is commonly used interchangeably with the phrase "Corporate America," it is also sometimes used in contrast to distinguish between the interests, culture, and lifestyles of investment banks and those of Fortune 500 industrial or service corporations.

Perceptions

Trinity church from Wall Street.

The older skyscrapers often were built with elaborate facades; such elaborate aesthetics haven't been common in corporate architecture for decades. The World Trade Center, built in the 1970s, was very plain and utilitarian in comparison (the Twin Towers were often criticized as looking like two big boxes, despite their impressive height).[citation needed]

Wall Street, more than anything, represents financial and economic power. To Americans, Wall Street can sometimes represent elitism and power politics. Wall Street became the symbol of a country and economic system that many Americans see as having developed through trade, capitalism, and innovation.[11]

In popular culture

  • Herman Melville's classic short story Bartleby, the Scrivener is subtitled A Story of Wall Street and provides an excellent portrayal of a kind and wealthy lawyer's struggle to reason with that which is unreasonable as he is pushed beyond his comfort zone to "feel" something real for humanity.
  • In William Faulkner's novel The Sound and the Fury, Jason Compson hits on other perceptions of Wall Street: after finding some of his stocks are doing poorly, he blames "the Jews."
  • The film Die Hard with a Vengeance has a plot involving thieves breaking into the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and stealing most of the gold bullion stored underground by driving dump trucks through a nearby Wall Street subway station.
  • Many events of Tom Wolfe's Bonfire of the Vanities center on Wall Street and its culture.
  • On January 26, 2000, the band Rage Against The Machine filmed the music video for "Sleep Now in the Fire" on Wall Street, which was directed by Michael Moore. The band at one point stormed the Stock Exchange, causing the doors of the Exchange to be closed early (2:52 P.M.). Trading on the Exchange floor, however, continued uninterrupted.[12][13]
  • The 1987 film Wall Street exemplifies many popular conceptions of Wall Street, being a tale of shady corporate dealings and insider trading.[14]
  • "Wallstreet Kingdom" is a controversial fashion brand promoting capitalism and bonuses on Wall Street.
  • In the film National Treasure a clue to finding the Templar Treasure leads the main characters to Wall Street's Trinity Church.
  • TNA Wrestler Robert Roode is billed from "Wall Street in Manhattan, New York."
  • Bret Easton Ellis's novel American Psycho follows the day-to-day life of Wall Street broker and sometimes serial killer Patrick Bateman.

Transportation

Pier 11

Because Wall Street was historically a commuter destination, it has seen much transportation infrastructure developed with it in mind. Today, Pier 11 at the foot of the street is a busy ferry terminal, and the New York City subway has three stations under Wall Street itself. You also easily travel around by feet:

Films shot in Manhattan

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Profile of Manhattan Community Board 1, retrieved July 17, 2007.
  2. ^ Merriam-Webster Online, retrieved July 17, 2007.
  3. ^ [The History of New York State, Book II, Chapter II, Part IV.] Editor, Dr. James Sullivan, Online Edition by Holice, Deb & Pam. Retrieved 20 August 2006.
  4. ^ White New Yorkers in Slave Times New York Historical Society. Retrieved 20 August 2006. (PDF)
  5. ^ a b Timeline: A selected Wall Street chronology PBS Online, 21 Octoberenculer de ta mere fils de puteense
  6. ^ Today in History: January 4 - The New York Stock Exchange The Library of Congress. Retrieved 19 August 20068.
  7. ^ DOW JONES HISTORY - THE LATE 1800s 2006 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Retrieved 19 August 2006.
  8. ^ Fulford, Robert (2002-04-20). "The Wall Street Journal redesigns itself". http://www.robertfulford.com/WallStreetJournal.html. Retrieved 2006-08-19. 
  9. ^ What building?
  10. ^ The Corners Project, .
  11. ^ Fraser (2005).
  12. ^ Basham, David (2000-01-28). "Rage Against The Machine Shoots New Video With Michael Moore". MTV News. http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1433553/20000128/rage_against_the_machine.jhtml. Retrieved 2007-09-24. 
  13. ^ "NYSE special closings since 1885" (PDF). http://www.nyse.com/pdfs/closings.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-24. 
  14. ^ IMDb entry for Wall Street Retrieved 19 August 2006.

References

  • Atwood, Albert W. and Erickson, Erling A. "Morgan, John Pierpont, (Apr. 17, 1837 - Mar. 31, 1913)," in Dictionary of American Biography, Volume 7 (1934)
  • Carosso, Vincent P. The Morgans: Private International Bankers, 1854-1913. Harvard U. Press, 1987. 888 pp. ISBN 978-0-674-58729-8
  • Carosso, Vincent P. Investment Banking in America: A History Harvard University Press (1970)
  • Chernow, Ron. The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance, (2001) ISBN 0-8021-3829-2
  • Fraser, Steve. Every Man a Speculator: A History of Wall Street in American Life HarperCollins (2005)
  • Geisst; Charles R. Wall Street: A History from Its Beginnings to the Fall of Enron. Oxford University Press. 2004. online edition
  • John Moody; The Masters of Capital: A Chronicle of Wall Street Yale University Press, (1921) online edition
  • Morris, Charles R. The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J. P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (2005) ISBN 978-0-8050-8134-3
  • Perkins, Edwin J. Wall Street to Main Street: Charles Merrill and Middle-class Investors (1999)
  • Robert Sobel The Big Board: A History of the New York Stock Market (1962)
  • Robert Sobel The Great Bull Market: Wall Street in the 1920s (1968)
  • Robert Sobel Inside Wall Street: Continuity & Change in the Financial District (1977)
  • Strouse, Jean. Morgan: American Financier. Random House, 1999. 796 pp. ISBN 978-0-679-46275-0

External links

Coordinates: 40°42′23″N 74°00′34″W / 40.70639°N 74.00944°W / 40.70639; -74.00944


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Wall Street was a 1987 film, starring Michael Douglas, Charlie Sheen and Daryl Hannah. The movie has come to be seen as the archetypal portrayal of 1980s excess, with Michael Douglas as the archetypal "Master of the Universe", based loosely on Ivan Boesky and other corporate raiders of the time. Metaphorically, this movie can also be seen as the depiction of a man's inner struggle with his conscience, and making wrong choices due to blinding temptation, despite the consequences.

Written by Stanley Weiser and Oliver Stone. Directed by Oliver Stone.
Every dream has a price.

Contents

Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas)

  • I loved it at 40, it's an insult at 50. They're analysts, they don't know preferred stock from livestock, alright? When it hits south, we raise the sperm count on the deal.
  • Hope you're Intelligent.
  • This is the kid. Calls me 59 days in a row, wants to be a player. Oughta be a picture of you in the dictionary under 'Persistence', kid.
  • Now, listen, Jerry, I'm looking for negative control. Okay? No more than 30, 35 percent. Just enough to block anybody else's merger plans and find out from the inside if the books are cooked. If it looks as good as on paper, we're in the kill zone, pal. Lock and load.
  • Lunch? Aw, You gotta be kidding. Lunch is for wimps.
  • What else you got besides connections at the airport?
  • What the hell is Cromwell doin' givin' a lecture tour when he's losing 60 million a quarter? Guess he's giving lectures on how to lose money. Jesus Christ...if this guy owned a funeral parlor, no one would die! This turkey is totally brain-dead! OK, alright, Christmas is over, and business is business. Keep on buying, dilute the son of a bitch! Ollie, I want every orifice in his fucking body flowing red.
  • It's not bad for a quant, but that's a dog with different fleas.
  • Come on pal, tell me something I don't know, it's my birthday. Surprise me.
  • Blow 'em away, Ollie. Rip their fucking throats out. Stuff 'em in your garbage compactor.
  • Bud Fox, I look at a hundred deals a day. I choose one.
  • Alright Bud Fox, I want you to buy 20,000 shares of Bluestar, at 15 1/8, 3/8 tops. Don't screw it up, sport. Think you can handle that?
  • Relax pal, no one's gonna blow the whistle on ya. Is that legal? You should put that in my account.
  • Buy a decent suit. You can't come in here looking like this. Go to Morty Sills, tell 'em I sent ya.
  • Save the cheap salesman talk, will ya, it's obvious.
  • I don't like losses, sport. Nothing ruins my day more than losses. Now you do good, you get perks, lots and lots of perks.
  • Bought my way in, now all these Ivy League schmucks are suckin' my kneecaps.
  • That's the thing you gotta remember about WASPs - they love animals, they can't stand people.
  • The most valuable commodity I know of, is information
  • The public's out there throwin' darts at a board, sport. I don't throw darts at a board - I bet on sure things.
  • Every battle is won before it's ever fought. Think about it.
  • You ever wonder why fund managers can't beat the S&P 500? Because they're sheep, and sheep get slaughtered.
  • Most of these Harvard MBA types - they don't add up to dogshit. Give me guys that are poor, smart, hungry - and no feelings. You win a few, you lose a few, but you keep on fighting.
  • And if you need a friend, get a dog. It's trench warfare out there pal.
  • You want another chance? You stop sending me information, and start getting me some.
  • You see that building? I bought that building ten years ago. My first real estate deal. Sold it 2 years later, made an 800,000 dollar profit. It was better than sex. At the time, I thought that was all the money in the world; now it's a day's pay.
  • I'm afraid pal, unless your father is on the board of directors of another company, you and I are going to have a very tough time doing business together.
  • You work hard? I'll bet you stayed up all night analyzing that dogshit stock you gave me, huh? where'd it get you? My father, he worked like an elephant pushing electrical supplies and he dropped dead at 49 with a heart attack and tax bills.
  • Wake up, will ya pal? If you're not inside, you're outside, OK? And I'm not talking a $400,000 a year working Wall Street stiff flying first class and being comfortable, I'm talking about liquid. Rich enough to have your own jet. Rich enough not to waste time. Fifty, a hundred million dollars buddy. A player, or nothing. Now you had what it took to get into my office; The real question is whether you got what it takes to stay.
  • Showdowns bore me, Larry. Nobody wins. You can have the company. In fact, it's gonna be fun watching you and your giant ego try and make a horse race out of it.
  • Well now considering you brought my mother into it, 71.50.
  • Money never sleeps, pal. Just made 800,000 Hong Kong Gold, it's been wired to ya. Play with it. You done good, but you gotta keep doing good. I showed you how the game works, now school's out.
  • No, no, no, no, you don't understand. I wanna be surprised. Astonish me pal. New Info - I don't care where, or how you get it - just get it.
  • I'm gonna make you rich, Bud Fox. Yeah, rich enough, you can afford a girl like Darien. This is your wake-up call, pal. Go to work.
  • We're smart enough not to buy into the oldest myth running - Love. Fiction created by people to keep them from jumping out of windows.
  • I appreciate the opportunity you're giving me, Mr. Cromwell, as the single largest shareholder of Teldar Paper, to speak.
  • The Carnegies, the Mellons, the men who built this great industrial empire, made sure of it because it was their money at stake.
  • Well, in my book, you either do it right, or you get eliminated.
  • I am not a destroyer of companies, I am a liberator of them.
  • The point is, ladies and gentlemen, that greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Greed is right. Greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all of its forms - greed for life, for money, for love, knowledge - has marked the upward surge of mankind, and greed - you mark my words - will not only save Teldar Paper but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA. Thank you.
  • Mixed emotions, Buddy. Like, Larry Wildman going off a cliff, in my new Maserati.
  • You tell those spineless assholes we'll self-insure if they don't write it. I can't believe you can fire half the management, nothing changes!
  • Look I.. I have no illusions about winning a popularity contest, with any of you. I got roasted the other night - friend of mine asked, "Why are we honoring this man, have we run out of human beings?" I mean it's not always the popular guy who gets the job done.
  • We got a stockbroker who wants to run an airline.
  • I'm up to my ass with more nuts than a fruitcake.
  • So the falcon's heard the falconer, huh?
  • Sure now what's worth doing, is worth doing for money. If it's a bad bargain, nobody gains, and if we do this deal, everybody gains.
  • Well you were walking around blind without a cane, pal. A fool and his money are lucky enough to get together in the first place.
  • It's all about bucks, kid. The rest is conversation.
  • It's not a question of enough, pal. It's a Zero Sum game - somebody wins, somebody loses. Money itself isn't lost or made, it's simply transferred - from one perception to another. Like magic.
  • This painting here? I bought it ten years ago for sixty thousand dollars, I could sell it today for six hundred. The illusion has become real, and the more real it becomes, the more desperately they want it. Capitalism at its finest.
  • The richest one percent of this country owns half our country's wealth, five trillion dollars. One third of that comes from hard work, two thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons; And what I do, stock and real estate speculation. It's bullshit. You got ninety percent of the American public out there with little or no net worth. I create nothing. I own.
  • We make the rules, pal. The news, war, peace, famine, upheaval, price of a paper clip. We pick that rabbit out of the hat when everybody sits out there wondering how the hell we did it.
  • Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you, Buddy? It's the free market, and you're part of it. Yeah, you got that killer instinct. Stick around pal, I still got a lot to teach you.
  • I want zip-locked mouths on the Bluestar deal, or I'm gonna personally come down there and rip out their fucking throats.
  • When I get a hold of the son of a bitch who leaked this, I am going to tear his eyeballs out and suck his fucking skull.
  • Sell it all. What the hell, so we only make ten million.
  • Where the hell are you? I am losing MILLIONS! You got me into this company and sure as hell better get me out or the only job you'll have on the Street is SWEEPING IT! You hear me, Fox?

Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen)

  • I'm tapped out Marv. American Express got a hit man lookin' for me.
  • Having sex with her was like reading the Wall Street Journal.
  • You step out that door, and I'm changing the locks.
  • Life all comes down to a few moments. This is one of them.
  • You're only the best money can buy, Darien.
  • I don't know. I guess I realized that I'm just Bud Fox... and as much as I wanted to be Gordon Gekko, I'll always be Bud Fox.
  • I gotta live in Manhattan to be a player. There's no nobility in poverty anymore.
  • Good Carolyn, Doing any better would be a sin.

Lou Mannheim (Hal Holbrook)

  • Jesus you can't make a buck in this market, the country's goin' to hell faster than when that son of a bitch Roosevelt was in charge. Too much cheap money sloshing around the world. The worst mistake we ever made was letting Nixon get off the gold standard.
  • Stick to the fundamentals. That's how IBM and Hilton were built. Good things, sometimes, take time.
  • You can't get a little bit pregnant.
  • Kid, you're on a roll. Enjoy it while it lasts, 'cause it never does.
  • Man looks into the Abyss, and there's nothin' staring back at him. At that moment, man finds his character, and that's what keeps him out of the Abyss.

Carl Fox (Martin Sheen)

  • Stop going for the easy buck and start producing something with your life. Create, instead of living off the buying and selling of others.
  • I don't go to sleep with no whore and I don't wake up with no whore. That's how I live with myself. I don't know how you do it.
  • Money's only something you need in case you don't die tomorrow...

Roger Barnes (James Spader)

  • Well, you're only the President of the company. What the hell do you know, anyway?

Marv (John C. McGinley)

  • You've been a real schmuck lately. So go thou and sin no more.
  • Oh, this is very nice. This is very nice. So what’s it, *Mr.* Cocksucker now?
  • Come on forget charts, will ya? We’re not fund managers here baby. Churn ‘em and burn ‘em. I am offering you the Knicks, and chicks.
  • Boy, we sure took a bath on that ugly b#*@!

Sir Larry Wildman (Terence Stamp)

  • You're a two bit pirate and a greenmailer. Nothing more... Gekko! Not only will you sell your mother to make a deal, you'd send her C.O.D.
  • I could break you, mate, in two pieces over my knees. You know it, I know it. I could buy you six times over. I could dump the stock just to burn your arse. But I happen to want the company, and I want your block of shares.

Panos Marsala (Yanni Sfinias)

  • Thank you for telling me what I already know.

Dialogue

Gekko: Money never sleeps pal. I just made $800,000 in Hong Kong gold. It's been wired to you -- play with it. You done good, but you gotta keep doing good. I showed you how the game works, now school's out.
Bud: Mr. Gekko, I'm there for you 110%.
Gekko: No, no, no, no, you don't understand. I want to be surprised. Astonish me, pal, new info, don't care where or how you get it, just get it. My wife tells me you made a move on Darien. Here's some inside info for ya. That Euroflash GQ type she's going with? He's got big bucks but he's putting her feet to sleep. Exit visas are imminent. I don't want you to lose your place in line. [gazing at the surf] Oh, jeez, I wish you could see this... the lights coming up over the water. I've never seen a painting that captures the beauty of the ocean at this moment. I'm going to make you rich Bud Fox, rich enough, you can afford a girl like Darien. This is your wake up call, pal. Go to work.
Bud: Lou, I got a sure thing. Anacott Steel.
Mannheim: No such thing except death and taxes. No fundamentals, not a good company any more. What's goin' on, Bud? You know something? Remember there are no shortcuts, son. Quick buck artists come and go with every bull market, but the steady players make it through the bear market. You're a part of something here, Bud. The money you make for people creates science and research jobs, don't sell that out
Bud: You're right, Lou, you're right. But you gotta make it to the big time first, then you can be a pillar and do good things.
Mannheim: You can't get a little bit pregnant, son.
Bud: Lou, trust me, its a winner. Buy it.
Bud: I guess you're a decorator.
Darien: You got it. Great spender of other people's money.
Gekko: The rarest pistol in the world, Larry. A .45 Luger. Only six of them were ever manufactured.
Wildman: Congratulations. Rarer still is your interest in Anacott Steel.
Gekko: My interest is the same as yours, Larry. Money. I thought it'd be a good investment for my kid.
Wildman: No this time I'm in for the long term, its not a liquidation. I'm going to turn it around. You're getting a free ride on my tail, mate. With the dollars you're costing me to buy back the stock, I could modernize the plant. I'm not the only one who pays here, Gordon. We're talking about lives and jobs, three and four generations of steelworkers.
Gekko: Correct me if I'm wrong, but when you acquired CNX Electronics you laid off, what, 6000 workers? Jemson Fruit, 4000? That airline you bought..umm
Wildman: I could break you, mate, in two pieces over my knees. You know it, I know it. I could buy you six times over. I could dump the stock just to burn your arse. But i happen to want the company, and I want your block of shares.
Wildman: 71?
Gekko: Well now considering you brought my mother into it, 71.50.
Wildman: Done. You'll hear from my lawyers tomorrow, 8 AM. Good Night. [leaves]
Gekko: [to Bud] He's right, I had to sell. The key to the game is your capital reserves, If you haven't got enough, you can't piss in the tall weed with the big dogs.
Carl: He's using you, kid. He's got your prick in his back pocket, but you're too blind to see it.
Bud: No. What I see is a jealous old machinist who can't stand the fact that his son has become more successful than he has!
Carl: What you see is a guy who never measured a man's success by the size of his WALLET!
Bud: That's because you never had the guts to go out into the world and stake your own claim!

[Long Pause]

Carl: Boy, if that's the way you feel, I must have done a really lousy job as a father.
Bud: Why do you need to wreck this company?
Gekko: Because it's wreckable, alright? I took another look at it, I changed my mind.
Roger: Still seeing that sexy french chick?
Bud: No, No. She asked the wrong question.
Roger: What was that?
Bud:"What are you thinking?"
Bud: You frakkin' used me!
Gekko: Well you're walkin' around blind without a cane, pal. A fool and his money are lucky enough to get together in the first place.
Bud: How much is enough, Gordon? When does it all end, huh? How many yatchs can you water-ski behind? How much is enough, huh?
Gekko: It's not a question of enough, pal. It's a Zero Sum game - somebody wins, somebody loses. Money itself isn't lost or made, it's simply, transferred - from one perception to another. Like magic. This painting here? I bought it ten years ago for sixty thousand dollars, I could sell it today for six hundred. The illusion has become real, and the more real it becomes, the more desperately they want it. Capitalism at it's finest.
Bud: How much is enough, Gordon?
Gekko: The richest one percent of this country owns half our country's wealth, five trillion dollars. One third of that comes from hard work, two thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons; And what I do, stock and real estate speculation. It's bullshit. You got ninety percent of the American public out there with little or no net worth. I create nothing. I own.
Bud: Bluestar, Mr. Mannheim. Put all your clients on it. It's gonna move.
Mannhiem: I don't know where you get your information, son, but I don't like it. The main thing about money, Bud, it makes you do things you don't wanna do.
Bud: Good morning Chuckie. Morning, Lou.
Mannheim: Bud, I like you. Just remember something. Man looks into the abyss. There's nothing staring back at him. At that moment, man finds his character, and that's what keeps him out of the abyss.
Gekko: Where the hell are you? I am losing MILLIONS! You got me into this company and sure as hell better get me out or the only job you'll have on the Street is SWEEPING IT! You hear me, Fox?
Bud:You once told me, don't get emotional about stock. Don't! The bid is 16 1/2 and going down. As your broker, I advise you to take it.
Gekko: Yeah. Well you TAKE IT! Right in the ass you frakking scumbag cocksucker!
Bud: It's two minutes to closing, Gordon. What do you want to do? Decide.
Gekko: Dump it.
Gekko: Hiya, Buddy.
Bud: Gordon.
Gekko: Sand bagged me on Bluestar huh? I guess you think you taught the teacher a lesson that the tail can wag the dog huh? Well let me clue you in, pal. The ice is melting right underneath your feet.

[punches Bud]

Gekko: Did you think you could've gotten this far this fast with anyone else, huh? That you'd be out there dicking someone like Darien? Naw... you'd still be cold calling widows and dentists tryin' to sell 'em 20 shares of some dog shit stock. I took you in...

[hits him again]

Gekko: a NOBODY!

[hits him harder]

Gekko: I opened the doors for you... showed you how the system works... the value of information... how to *get it*! Fulham Oil, Brant Resources, Geo Dynamics and this is how you fucking pay me back you COCKROACH!

[knocks Bud to the ground]

Gekko: I GAVE you Darien! I GAVE you your manhood I gave you EVERYTHING!

[calms down]

Gekko: You could've been one of the great ones Buddy. I look at you and see myself... WHY?
Bud:I don't know. I guess I realized that I'm just Bud Fox... and as much as I wanted to be Gordon Gekko, I'll always be Bud Fox.

See also

Wikipedia
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External links


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

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Wikipedia

Proper noun

Singular
Wall Street

Plural
Wall Street

Wall Street (Wall Street)

  1. The physical street in lower Manhattan and the financial institutions located (or formerly located) there.
  2. (idiomatic): American financial markets, financial institutions as a whole, or by extension, big-business interests.

Antonyms


Simple English

File:Wall Street
A map of Wall Street and streets near it.

Wall Street is a street in Lower Manhattan, New York City. It runs east from Broadway to South Street on the East River and through the Financial District. It is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange and Federal Hall. Most headquarters of many other American exchanges NYSE, NASDAQ, AMEX, NYMEX, NYBOT are also run from Wall Street.








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