Water polo at the 1988 Summer Olympics: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Water polo at the 1988 Summer Olympics as usual was part of the swimming sport, the other two being swimming and diving. They were not seen as three separate sports, because they all were governed by one federation — FINA. Water polo discipline consisted of one event: the men's team competition.

In the preliminary round twelve teams were divided into two groups. The two best teams from each group (shaded ones) advanced to the semi-finals. The two numbers three and four played classification matches to determine places 5 through 8, with the earlier result taken with them. The rest of the teams also played played classification matches to determine places 9 through 12.

Contents

Preliminary Round

Advertisements

Group A

Team Pld W D L GF GA Pts
 West Germany 5 5 0 0 60 37 10
 Soviet Union 5 3 1 1 63 30 7
 Italy 3 3 1 1 48 33 7
 Australia 3 2 0 3 40 39 4
 France 3 1 0 4 43 54 2
 South Korea 5 0 0 5 14 75 0
  • September 21
    • Italy 9-9 Soviet Union
    • France 16-5 South Korea
    • Australia 11-13 West Germany
  • September 22
    • South Korea 1-11 Italy
    • France 9-10 West Germany
    • Australia 4-11 Soviet Union
  • September 23
    • South Korea 2-18 West Germany
    • Australia 5-7 Italy
    • France 4-18 Soviet Union
  • September 26
    • Italy 7-10 West Germany
    • South Korea 4-17 Soviet Union
    • France 6-7 Australia
  • September 27
    • France 8-14 Italy
    • Australia 13-2 South Korea
    • Soviet Union 8-9 West Germany

Group B

Team Pld W D L GF GA Pts
 United States 5 4 0 1 56 40 8
 Yugoslavia 5 4 0 1 60 38 8
 Spain 5 3 1 1 48 38 7
 Hungary 5 2 1 2 50 43 5
 Greece 5 1 0 4 45 66 2
 China 5 0 0 5 34 68 0
  • September 21
    • Hungary 12-10 Greece
    • United States 7-6 Yugoslavia
    • China 6-13 Spain
  • September 22
    • Greece 10-7 China
    • United States 7-9 Spain
    • Hungary 9-10 Yugoslavia
  • September 23
    • United States 14-7 China
    • Greece 7-17 Yugoslavia
    • Hungary 6-6 Spain
  • September 26
    • United States 18-9 Greece
    • Hungary 14-7 China
    • Spain 8-10 Yugoslavia
  • September 27
    • Greece 9-12 Spain
    • Hungary 9-10 United States
    • Yugoslavia 17-7 China

Final Round

Semi finals

  • September 30
    • West Germany 10-14 Yugoslavia
    • Soviet Union 7-8 United States

Bronze Medal Match

  • October 1
    • West Germany 13-14 Soviet Union

Final

  • October 1
    • Yugoslavia 9-7 United States

Group D

Rank Team Pld W D L GF GA Pts
5  Hungary 3 1 2 0 28 20 4
6  Spain 3 1 1 1 24 23 3
7  Italy 3 1 1 1 25 25 3
8  Australia 3 1 0 2 18 27 2
  • September 30
    • Italy 9-9 Hungary
    • Australia 8-7 Spain
  • October 1
    • Australia 5-13 Hungary
    • Italy 9-11 Spain

Group E

Rank Team Pld W D L GF GA Pts
9  Greece 3 3 0 0 37 21 6
10  France 3 2 0 1 34 19 4
11  China 3 1 0 2 25 28 2
12  South Korea 3 0 0 3 19 47 0
  • September 30
    • France 11-4 China
    • South Korea 7-17 Greece
  • October 1
    • South Korea 7-14 China
    • France 7-10 Greece

Final Ranking

RANK TEAM
Med 1.png  Yugoslavia
Med 2.png  United States
Med 3.png  Soviet Union
4.  West Germany
5.  Hungary
6.  Spain
7.  Italy
8.  Australia
9.  Greece
10.  France
11.  China
12.  South Korea
 1988 Men's Olympic Champions 

Yugoslavia
Third title

Team Rosters

 Australia

Glenn Townsend, Richard Pengelley, Christopher Harrison, Troy Stockwell, Andrew Wightman, Andrew Kerr, Raymond Mayers, Geoffrey Clark, John Fox, Christopher Wybrow, Simon Asher, Andrew Taylor, and Donald Cameron. Head Coach: Tom Hoad.

 China

Ni Shiwei, Wang Minhui, Yang Yong, Yu Xiang, Huang Long, Huang Qijiang, Cui Shiping, Zhao Bilong, Li Jianxiong, Cai Shengliu, Wen Fan, Ge Jianqing, and Zheng Qing. Head Coach: Peng Shaorong.

 France

Arnaud Bouet, Marc Brisfer, Marc Crousillat, Pierre Garsau, Bruno Boyadjian, Philippe Herve, Michel Idoux, Thierry Alimondo, Michel Crousillat, Nicolas Marischael, Nicolas Jeleff, Pascal Perot, and Christian Volpi. Head Coach: Jean Paul Clemencon.

 Greece

Nikolaos Christoforidis, Philippos Kaiafas, Epaminondas Samartzidis, Anastassios Tsikaris, Kyriakos Giannopoulos, Aris Kefalogiannis, Nikolaos Venetopoulos, Dimitrios Seletopoulos, Andonios Aronis, Evangelos Pateros, Georgios Mavrotas, and Evangelos Patras. Head Coach: Losifidis Koulis

 Hungary

Peter Kuna, Gabor Bujka, Gabor Schmiedt, Zsolt Petovary, Istvan Pinter, Tibor Keszthelyi, Balazs Vincze, Zoltan Mohi, Tibor Pardi, Laszlo Toth, Andras Gyongyosi, Zoltan Kosz, and Imre Tóth. Head Coach: Zoltan Kasas

 Italy

Paolo Trapanese, Alfio Misaggi, Andrea Pisano, Antonello Steardo, Alessandro Campagna, Paolo Caldarella, Mario Fiorillo, Francesco Porzio, Stefano Postiglione, Riccardo Tempestini, Massimiliano Ferretti, Marco d'Altrui, and Gianni Averaimo. Head Coach: Fritz Dennerlein.

 South Korea

Jung-Suk Lee, Si-Young Chang, Sung-Eun Kim, Seung-Hoon Yoo, Ki-Choon Kim, Jae-Yun Kim, Sun-Young Choi, Kil-Hwan Kim, Jin-Tae Kim, Seung-Ho Song, Soon-Bo Hong, Taek-Won Lee, and Sang-Won Park. Head Coach: Jong-Ku Kim.

 Soviet Union

Evgueni Charonov, Nourlan Mendygaliev, Evgeni Grichine, Alexandre Kolotov, Sergei Naoumov, Victor Berendiouga, Serguei Kotenko, Dmitri Apanasenko, Georgui Mchvenieradze, Mikhail Ivanov, Serguei Markotch, Nikolai Smirnov, and Mikhail Giorgadze. Head Coach: Boris Popov.

 Spain

Jesus Rollan, Miguel Chillida, Marco Antonio Gonzalez, Miguel Pérez, Manuel Estiarte, Pere Robert, Jorge Paya, José Antonio Rodriguez, Jorge Sans, Salvador Gómez, Mariano Moya, Jorge Neira, and Pedro Garcia. Head Coach: Antonio Esteller.

 United States

Craig Wilson, Kevin Robertson, James Bergeson, Peter Campbell, Douglas Kimbell, Edward Klass, Alan Mouchawar, Jeffrey Campbell, Gregory Boyer, Terry Schroeder, Jody Campbell, Christopher Duplanty, and Michael Evans. Head Coach: Bill Barnett.

 West Germany

Peter Röhle, Dirk Jacoby, Frank Otto, Uwe Sterzik, Armando Fernandez, Andreas Ehrl, Ingo Borgmann, Rainer Osselmann, Hagen Stamm, Thomas Huber, Dirk Theismann, René Reimann, and Werner Obschernikat. Head Coach: Nicola Firuio.

 Yugoslavia

Aleksandar Šoštar, Deni Lušić, Dubravko Šimenc, Perica Bukić, Veselin Đuho, Dragan Andrić, Mirko Vičević, Igor Gočanin, Mislav Bezmalinović, Tomislav Paškvalin, Igor Milanović, Goran Rađenović, and Petar Kočić. Head Coach: Ratko Rudić.

(Note: from the winning Yugoslav team, 6 players were from Croatia:
Deni Lušić, Dubravko Šimenc, Perica Bukić, Veselin Đuho, Mislav Bezmalinović, Tomislav Paškvalin and Renco Posinković.
From Montenegro was 1 player: Mirko Vičević.
From Serbia were 6 players: Aleksandar Šoštar, Dragan Andrić, Igor Milanović, Goran Rađenović, Petar Kočić, and Igor Gočanin.)

See also

References


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message