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Wedell-Williams XP-34: Wikis

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The Wedell-Williams XP-34 was a fighter aircraft design submitted to the United States Army Air Corps before World War II by Marguerite Clark Williams, widow of millionaire Harry P. Williams.

Williams was owner of Wedell-Williams Air Service Corporation, "one of the most noted race plane designers of its day".[1] The aircraft was the brainchild of air racer Jimmy Wedell, a direct result of the development of Wedell's most successful designs, the Model 44 and Model 45.

On October 1, 1935, the USAAC ordered a full set of drawings and issued the XP-34 designation. It soon became apparent, however, with its original 700 hp (522 kW) Pratt & Whitney R1535 Twin Wasp engine, the anticipated performance of the XP-34 would be insufficient compared to designs already in production. Wedell-Williams suggested substituting the 900 hp (670 kW) XR-1830 instead, but the Air Corps was no longer interested and the project was cancelled without any aircraft being built.

The forward fuselage was intended to be metal, the after part and control surfaces covered in fabric.[1]

Contents

Specifications (proposed)

Data from U.S. Fighters

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1 pilot
  • Length: 23 ft 6 in (7.2 m)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 8½ in (8.45 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 9 in (3.28 m)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R1535 aircooled radial, 600 hp (450 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 286 mph (460 km/h)

See also

Related development

Related lists

References

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Notes

  1. ^ a b Jones 1975, p. 80.

Bibliography

  • Jones, Lloyd S. U.S. Fighters, Army-Air Force: 1925 to 1980s. Los Angeles: Aero Publishers Incorporated, 1975. ISBN 0-8168-9200-8.

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