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For the Canadian comic strip, see Weltschmerz (comic strip).

Weltschmerz (from the German, meaning world-pain or world-weariness) is a term coined by the German author Jean Paul and denotes the kind of feeling experienced by someone who understands that physical reality can never satisfy the demands of the mind. This kind of pessimistic world view was widespread among several romantic authors such as Lord Byron, Giacomo Leopardi, François-René de Chateaubriand, Alfred de Musset, Nikolaus Lenau, Herman Hesse, and Heinrich Heine. It is also used to denote the feeling of sadness when thinking about the evils of the world—compare empathy, theodicy.

The modern meaning of Weltschmerz in the German language is the psychological pain caused by sadness that can occur when realizing that someone's own weaknesses are caused by the inappropriateness and cruelty of the world and (physical and social) circumstances. Weltschmerz in this meaning can cause depression, resignation and escapism, and can become a mental problem (compare to Hikikomori). The modern meaning should also be compared with the concept of anomie, or a kind of alienation, that Émile Durkheim wrote about in his sociological treatise Suicide.

Contents

Applications

John Steinbeck wrote about this feeling in The Winter of Our Discontent and referred to it as the Welshrats; and in East of Eden, it is felt by Samuel Hamilton after meeting Cathy Trask for the first time. Ralph Ellison uses the term in Invisible Man with regard to the pathos inherent in the singing of spirituals: "...beneath the swiftness of the hot tempo there was a slower tempo and a cave and I entered it and looked around and heard an old woman singing a spiritual as full of Weltschmerz as flamenco." In music, pseudo-Weltschmerz, and especially dark "romanticism," play an important part in Gothic rock.

In Music

  • Song title from the band The Cutler on their Black Flag album.

See also

External Links


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also weltschmerz

Contents

German

Etymology

Compound of Welt and Schmerz

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /'vɛltʃmɛrʦ/

Noun

Weltschmerz m

  1. World-weariness, Weltschmerz







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