Wesel: Wikis

  
  

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Wesel
Willibrordi-Dom in Wesel
Willibrordi-Dom in Wesel
Coat of arms of Wesel
Wesel is located in Germany
Wesel
Coordinates 51°39′31″N 6°37′4″E / 51.65861°N 6.61778°E / 51.65861; 6.61778
Administration
Country Germany
State North Rhine-Westphalia
Admin. region Düsseldorf
District Wesel
Town subdivisions 5
Mayor Ulrike Westkamp (SPD)
Basic statistics
Area 122.617 km2 (47.343 sq mi)
Elevation 23 m  (75 ft)
Population 61,432  (31 December 2006)
 - Density 501 /km2 (1,298 /sq mi)
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate WES
Postal codes 46483, 46485, 46487
Area codes 02 81
0 28 03 (Büderich)
0 28 59 (Bislich)
Website www.wesel.de
Location of the town of Wesel within Wesel district
Map
97% of Wesel was destroyed before it was finally taken by Allied troops in 1945

Wesel (German pronunciation: [ˈveːzəl]) is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is the capital of the Wesel district.

Contents

Geography

Wesel is situated at the point where the Lippe River empties into the Rhine.

Division of the town

Suburbs of Wesel include Lackhausen, Obrighoven, Ginderich, Feldmark, Büderich, Flüren and Blumenkamp.

History

The city originates from a Franconian manor that was first mentioned in the 8th century. In the 12th century, Wesel came into the possession of the Duke of Cleves. The city was given extensive privileges and became a member of the Hanseatic League during the 15th century. Within the Duchy of Cleves, Wesel was second only to Cologne in the lower Rhine region as an entrepôt. It was an important commercial centre: a clearing station for the transshipment and trading of goods.

Wesel was inherited by the Hohenzollerns of the Margraviate of Brandenburg in 1609. Friedrich Wilhelm von Dossow was the Prussian Governor of Wesel during the 18th century. The city became part of the Prussian Rhine Province after the Napoleonic Wars.

During World War II, Wesel became a target of the Allies particularly in its capacity as a strategic depot. On the 16, 17 and 19 February 1945, the town was attacked with impact and air-burst weapons and destroyed 97% of the city. The Rhine and Lippe bridges were blown by the Wehrmacht; among others, on 10 March, the 1,950m long railway bridge, the last Rhine bridge remaining in German hands. On 23 March, Wesel came under the fire of over 3,000 guns when it was bombarded anew, in preparation for Operation Plunder. 97% of the town was destroyed before it was finally taken by Allied troops and the population had fallen from almost 25,000 in 1939 to 1,900 in May 1945.[1] Wesel became part of the new state North Rhine-Westphalia in 1946.

Politics

Wesel's mayors:

  • 1808–1814: Johann Hermann Westermann
  • 1814–1840: Christian Adolphi
  • 1841–1862: Franz Luck
  • 1863–1870: Wilhelm Otto van Calker
  • 1870–1881: Carl Friedrich August von Albert
  • 1881–1891: Caspar Baur
  • 1891–1902: Josef Fluthgraf (1896 Oberbürgermeister)
  • 1903–1931: Ludwig Poppelbaum
  • 1931–1933: Emil Nohl
  • 1933–1945: Otto Borgers

Since 1945:

  • 1945: Jean Groos
  • 1945: Wilhelm Groos
  • 1946–1947: Anton Ebert (CDU)
  • 1947–1948: Paul Körner (CDU)
  • 1948–1952: Ewald Fournell (CDU)
  • 1952–1956: Helmut Berckel (CDU)
  • 1956–1966: Kurt Kräcker (SPD)
  • 1967–1969: Willi Nakaten (SPD)
  • 1969–1979: Günther Detert (CDU)
  • 1979–1984: Wilhelm Schneider (SPD)
  • 1984–1989: Volker Haubitz (CDU)
  • 1989–1994: Wilhelm Schneider (SPD)
  • 1994–1999: Bernhard Gründken (SPD)
  • 1999–2004: Jörn Schroh (CDU)
  • since 2004: Ulrike Westkamp (SPD)

International relations

Twin towns — Sister cities

Wesel is twinned with:=

Buildings and places of interest in Wesel

  • Berliner Tor
  • Willibrordi-Dom (Cathedral)
  • Zitadelle Wesel (Citadel)
  • Broadcasting Mast Wesel, one of Germany's tallest constructions

People born in Wesel

Miscellaneous

One of Germany's highest radio masts is situated in the district of Büderich on the left bank of the Rhine. It measures 320.08 metres.

Footnotes

  1. ^ RAF campaign diary March 1944 — see the entry for 23-24 March 1945

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

WESEL, a fortress town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Westphalia at the confluence of the Rhine and the Lippe, 46 m. S W. of Munster and 35 m. N.W. of Duisburg. Pop.(1905) 2 3, 2 37 (43% Protestants), including a considerable garrison. There is a junction of five railway lines, and the Rhine is crossed by a large railway bridge and by a bridge of boats. The inner line of fortifications was razed in 1890, and the defensive works now consist only of the citadel and three detached forts, one of which, Fort Blucher, serves as a tete-de-pout on the left bank of the Rhine, Wesel contains some quaint old houses, and a town hall, dating from 1396, with an elaborate facade, and containing a valuable collection of old silver plate. The large Protestant church of St Willibrord has a choir, built 1424-1526, which is one of the noblest Gothic structures on the Lower Rhine, and a modern nave (1882-96). The Mathena church dates from 14291 477. The two Roman Catholic churches, the castle, now the commandant's house (built in 1417), the Berliner Tor Berlin gate - (built in 1722 and recently restored), the LowerRhenish museum of antiquities and the modern gymnasium and military hospital, are among the other chief buildings. Wesel carries on a considerable trade in grain, timber, colonial goods, tobacco, &c., facilitated by new harbour accommodation and wharves at the mouth of the Lippe. It has manufactures of wire, leaden pipes and other metal goods, cement, sugar, &c.

Wesel, formerly known as Lippemiinde, was one of the points from which Charlemagne directed his operations against the heathen Saxons. Incorporated in 1241, it became a flourishing commercial town, and though repeatedly subject to the counts o Cleves, was a member of the Hanseatic League, and as late as 1521 a free imperial city. It was occupied by the Spaniards in 1614, by the Dutch in 1629, by the French in 1672, also during the Seven Years' War, and in 1805, and was ceded to Prussia in 1814. A monument outside the town commemorates eleven of Ferdinand von Schill's officers who were shot here on the 16th of September 1809 after their unsuccessful attempt at Stralsund. Wesel is occasionally spoken of as Unterwesel, to distinguish. it from Oberwesel, a small town on the Rhine, above St Goar.

See Gantesweiler, Chronik der Stadt Wesel (Wesel, 1881), and Reinhold, Verfassungsgeschichte Wesels (Breslau, 1888).


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Simple English

Wesel

Wesel
Coordinates 51°39′31″N 6°37′4″E / 51.65861°N 6.61778°E / 51.65861; 6.61778
Administration
Country Germany
State North Rhine-Westphalia
Admin. region Düsseldorf
District Wesel
Town subdivisions 5 Quaters
Mayor Ulrike Westkamp (SPD)
Basic statistics
Area 122.53 km2 (47.31 sq mi)
Elevation 23 m  (75 ft)
Population 60,958  (31 December 2009)
 - Density 497 /km2 (1,289 /sq mi)
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate WES
Postal codes 46483 - 46487
Area codes 0 28 1
Website www.wesel.de
Location of the town of Wesel within Wesel district

Wesel is a city in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Moers is near to Duisburg and belongs to the Ruhr area. It has about 60,000 inhabitants.

It is a city since 1241.








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