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Westinghouse Electric Corporation
Fate Sold
Successor Viacom, Inc. (after 1997 renaming to CBS Corporation)
Founded as Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company (1886) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Defunct 1999
Headquarters Monroeville, PA
Key people George Westinghouse, Founder
Industry Electronics, etc.

Westinghouse Electric was an American power company. It was founded in 1886 as Westinghouse Electric Company and later renamed Westinghouse Electric Corporation by George Westinghouse. The company purchased CBS in 1995 and became CBS Corporation in 1997. George Westinghouse had previously founded the Westinghouse Air Brake Company.

The company pioneered long-distance power transmission and high-voltage transmission. Westinghouse Electric received the rights for the first patent for alternating-current transmission from Nikola Tesla and unveiled the technology for lighting in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

In addition to George Westinghouse, engineers working for the company included William Stanley, Nikola Tesla, Oliver B. Shallenberger, Benjamin Garver Lamme and his sister Bertha Lamme. It was historically the rival to General Electric which was founded by George Westinghouse's arch-rival, Thomas Edison (see War of the Currents).

The company is also known for its time capsule contributions during the 1939 New York World's Fair and 1964 New York World's Fair.

Westinghouse produced the first American turbojet to run, but fumbled on the disastrous J40 project. It not only severely hampered a generation of US Navy jets when the project had to be abandoned, but led to leaving the aircraft engine business in the 1950s.

Contents

Timeline of company evolution

George Westinghouse
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1880s

Starting years
  • 1886 - Founded Westinghouse Electric Company
  • 1889 - renames itself the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company

1890s

Alternating currents promoter

1900s to 1920s

Growth and change

1930s and 1940s

Enters the nuclear age
Industrial atom smasher
Close up of Westinghouse logo on historic kitchen stove at John & Mable Ringling Museum, Sarasota
  • 1940s - enters aviation with airborne radar (defense electronics sold 1996), jet engine propulsion, and ground based airport lighting, gets defense contract from U.S. Military to produce plastic helmet liners for the M1 Helmet
  • 1941 - after years of resistance to the unionization efforts of its employees and to the National Labor Relations Act,[1] signs a national labor agreement with the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America after a US Supreme Court decision that upheld the Act.[2]
  • 1945 - renames itself the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and makes first automatic elevator.
  • Aviation Gas Turbine Division (AGT) started in 1945

1950s to 1970s

Enters finance
Westinghouse Credit Corporation
  • 1955 - Westinghouse J40 engine failure causes all F3H fighters using the engine to be grounded, and all other jets using it to switch to other engines. Westinghouse forced out of aircraft engine business.
  • 1960s - acquires ThermoKing, begins automated mass transit (sold 1988); adopts "You Can Be Sure If It's Westinghouse" as advertising slogan for home appliances
  • 1970s - sells well-known home appliance division to White Consolidated Industries which becomes White-Westinghouse
  • 1979 - withdraws from all oil related projects in the Middle East after Iranian Revolution

1980s

1990s to 2000s

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Feurer R (2006). Radical Unionism in the Midwest, 1900-1950. University of Illinois Press.  
  2. ^ "Heartland of UE Struggle". UE. September 2002. http://www.ranknfile-ue.org/uen_0902_distrone.html. Retrieved 2008-04-20.  

External links


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