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White Rice
White Rice, medium-grain,
cooked
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 544 kJ (130 kcal)
Carbohydrates 28.59 g
Dietary fiber 0.3 g
Fat 0.21 g
saturated 0.057 g
monounsaturated 0.065 g
polyunsaturated 0.056 g
Protein 2.38 g
Water 68.61 g
Vitamin A equiv. 0 μg (0%)
Thiamine (Vit. B1) 0.167 mg (13%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.016 mg (1%)
Niacin (Vit. B3) 1.835 mg (12%)
Vitamin B6 0.05 mg (4%)
Folate (Vit. B9) 2 μg (1%)
Vitamin B12 0 μg (0%)
Vitamin C 0 mg (0%)
Calcium 3 mg (0%)
Iron 1.49 mg (12%)
Magnesium 13 mg (4%)
Phosphorus 37 mg (5%)
Potassium 29 mg (1%)
Sodium 0 mg (0%)
Zinc 0.42 mg (4%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

White rice is the name given to milled rice that has had its husk, bran, and germ removed. This is done largely to prevent spoilage and to extend the storage life of the grain. After milling, the rice is polished, resulting in a seed with a bright, white, shiny appearance.

The polishing process removes important nutrients. A diet based on unenriched white rice leaves people vulnerable to the neurological disease beriberi, due to a deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1). White rice is often enriched with some of the nutrients stripped from it during its processing. Enrichment of white rice with B1, B3, and iron is required by law in the United States.

At various times, starting in the 19th century, many have advocated brown rice or wild rice as healthier alternatives. The bran in brown rice contains significant dietary fiber and the germ contains many vitamins and minerals. (See whole grain.) This is in contrast to the traditional view of brown rice which was associated with poverty and famine.

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