The Full Wiki

William Allingham: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


William Allingham (19 March 1824 or 1828 - 18 November 1889) was an Irish man of letters and a poet.

He was born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, Ireland and was the son of the manager of a local bank who was of English descent. He obtained a post in the custom-house of his native town and held several similar posts in Ireland and England until 1870, when he had retired from the service, and became sub-editor of Fraser's Magazine, which he edited from 1874 to 1879, in succession to James Froude. He had published a volume of Poems in 1850, followed by Day and Night Songs, a volume containing many charming lyrics, in 1855. Allingham was on terms of close friendship with DG Rossetti, who contributed to the illustration of the Songs. His Letters to Allingham (1854-1870) were edited by Dr. Birkbeck Hill in 1897. Lawrence Bloomfield in Ireland, his most ambitious, though not his most successful work, a narrative poem illustrative of Irish social questions, appeared in 1864. He also edited The Ballad Book for the Golden Treasury series in 1864.

In 1874 Allingham married Helen Paterson, known under her married name as a water-colour painter. He died at Hampstead in 1889, and his ashes are interred at St. Anne's in his native Ballyshannon.

Though working on an unostentatious scale, Allingham produced much excellent lyrical and descriptive poetry, and the best of his pieces are thoroughly national in spirit and local colouring. His verse is clear, fresh, and graceful.

Other works are Fifty Modern Poems (1865), Songs, Poems, and Ballads (1877), Evil May Day (1883), Blackberries (1884), Irish Songs and Poems (1887), and Varieties in Prose (1893), and, arguably his most famous work, "The Faeries" (see below).

William Allingham: a Diary (1907), edited by Mrs Allingham and D Radford, contains many interesting reminiscences of Tennyson, Carlyle and other famous contemporaries.

The Ulster poet John Hewitt felt Allingham's influence keenly, and his attempts to revive his reputation included editing and writing an introduction to The Poems of William Allingham (Oxford University Press/ Dolmen Press, 1967).

Appearance in popular culture

The opening lines from Allingham's poem The Fairies was quoted by the character of The Tinker near the beginning of the movie Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, as well as in Mike Mignola's comic book short story Hellboy: The Corpse, plus the 1973 horror film Don't Look in the Basement:

Up the airy mountain/Down the rushy glen/We daren't go a-hunting/For fear of little men; The working title of Terry Pratchett's The Wee Free Men was "For Fear Of Little Men".

External links

References


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

William Allingham (March 19, 1824 or 1828November 18, 1889) was an Irish man of letters and poet.

Sourced

  • Up the airy mountain,
    Down the rushy glen,
    We daren't go a-hunting,
    For fear of little men.
  • No funeral gloom, my dears, when I am gone,
    corpse-gazing, tears, black raiment, graveyard grimness.
    Think of me as withdrawn into the dimness,
    yours still, you mine.
    Remember all the best of our past moments,
    and forget the rest;
    and so to where I wait, come gently on.
    • Poem: No funeral gloom - part of funeral of actress Ellen Terry 1928

Unsourced

  • Winds and waters keep
    A hush more dead than any sleep.
    • Ruined Chapel.
  • Now Autumn's fire burns slowly along the woods
    And day by day the dead leaves fall and melt.
    • Autumnal Sonnet.
  • Autumn's the mellow time.
    • The Winter Pear.
  • Oh, bring again my heart's content,
    Thou Spirit of the Summer-time!
    • Song.
  • Scarcely a tear to shed;
    Hardly a word to say;
    The end of a Summer's day;
    Sweet Love is dead.
    • An Evening.
  • Tantarrara! the joyous Book of Spring
    Lies open, writ in blossoms.
    • Daffodil.
  • Mary kept the belt of love, and oh, but she was gay!
    She danced a jig, she sung a song that took my heart away.
    • Lovely Mary Donnelly.

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

WILLIAM ALLINGHAM (1824-1889), Irish man of letters and poet, was born at Ballyshannon, Donegal, on the 19th of March 1824 (or 1828, according to some authorities), and was the son of the manager of a local bank. He obtained a post in the custom-house of his native town and filled several similar situations in Ireland and England until 1870, when he had retired from the service, and became sub-editor of Fraser's Magazine, which he edited from 1874 to 1879. He had published a volume of Poems in 1850, followed by Day and Night Songs, a volume containing many charming lyrics, in 1855. Allingham was on terms of close friendship with D. G. Rossetti, who contributed to the illustration of the Songs. His Letters to Allingham (1854-1870) were edited by Dr Birkbeck Hill in 1897. Lawrence Bloomfield, a narrative poem illustrative of Irish social questions, appeared in 1864. Allingham married in 1874 Helen Paterson, known under her married name as a water-colour painter. He died at Hampstead on the 18th of November 1889. Though working on an unostentatious scale, Allingham produced much excellent lyrical and descriptive poetry, and the best of his pieces are thoroughly national in spirit and local colouring.

William Allingham: a Diary (1907), edited by Mrs Allingham and D. Radford, contains many interesting reminiscences of Tennyson, Carlyle and other famous contemporaries.


<< Alligator

William Boyd Allison >>








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message