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William Bradford (Plymouth governor)

Bradford's statue in Plymouth Rock State Park, Plymouth, Massachusetts

2nd, 5th, 7th, 9th & 11th Governor of Plymouth Colony
In office
1621 – 1633
1635 – 1636
1637 – 1638
1639 – 1644
1645 – 1657
Preceded by John Carver (1621)
Thomas Prence (1635)
Edward Winslow (1637)
Thomas Prence (1639)
Edward Winslow (1645)
Succeeded by Edward Winslow (1633)
Edward Winslow (1636)
Thomas Prence (1638)
Edward Winslow (1644)
Thomas Prence (1645)

Born March 19, 1590
Austerfield, Yorkshire, England
Died May 9, 1657 (aged 67)
Plymouth, Massachusetts
Nationality English
Spouse(s) Dorothy Bradford
Alice Carpenter
Religion Separatist

William Bradford (March 19, 1590 – May 9, 1657) was an English leader of the Separatist settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, and was elected thirty times to be the Governor after John Carver died. He was the second signer and primary architect of the Mayflower Compact in Provincetown Harbor. His journal (1620–47), was published as Of Plymouth Plantation. Bradford is credited as the first to proclaim what popular American culture now views as the first Thanksgiving.

Contents

Biography

The Manor House, Austerfield, Yorkshire - birthplace of William Bradford

William Bradford was born on March 19, 1590 near Doncaster, in Austerfield, Yorkshire. At an early age, he was attracted to the "primitive" congregational church, in nearby Scrooby, and became a committed member of what was termed a "Separatist" church, since the church-members had wanted to separate from the Church of England. By contrast, the Puritans wanted to purify the Church of England. The Separatists felt the Church was beyond redemption due to unbiblical doctrines and teachings.

When James I began to persecute Separatists in 1609, Bradford fled to the Netherlands, along with many members of the congregation. These Separatists went first to Amsterdam before settling at Leiden. Bradford married his first wife, Dorothy May (d. December 7, 1620), on December 10, 1613 in Amsterdam. While at Leiden, he supported himself as a fustian weaver.

Signing of the Mayflower Compact, a painting by Edward Percy Moran, which hangs at the Pilgrim Hall Museum

Shifting alignments of the European powers (due to religious differences, struggles over the monarchies and intrigues within the ruling Habsburg clan) caused the Dutch government to fear war with Catholic Spain, and to become allied with James I of England. Social pressure (and even attacks) on the separatists increased in the Netherlands. Their congregation's leader, John Robinson, supported the emerging idea of starting a colony. Bradford was in the midst of this venture from the beginning. The separatists wanted to remain Englishmen (although living in the Netherlands), yet wanted to get far enough away from the Church of England and the government to have some chance of living in peace. Arrangements were made, and William with his wife sailed for America in 1620 from Leiden aboard the Mayflower.

Bas-relief on Bradford Street in Provincetown depicting the signing of the Mayflower Compact

On December 7, 1620, before the colony was established, Bradford's wife died. [1] Dorothy Bradford died while the Mayflower was at anchor in Provincetown Harbor. However, there are no contemporary accounts of the circumstances of her death, only a later mention of drowning by Cotton Mather in Magnalia Christi Americana. [2] Bradford included only brief mention of her passing in his own writing. There is a widely circulated story that she committed suicide because the Mayflower was a moored ship, but this is derived from a work of historical fiction published in the June, 1869 issue of Harper's New Monthly Magazine. This claims that they had decided to leave their young son in the Netherlands, and his wife was so stricken with sadness that she took her own life. Regardless of this fictional treatment, there is no proof of suicide. Although it is more likely to be referred to as an accident of her falling off the front side of the ship. [3]

The first winter in the new colony was a terrible experience. Half the colonists perished, including the colony's leader, John Carver. Bradford was selected as his replacement on the spring of 1621. From this point, his story is inextricably linked with the history of the Plymouth Colony.

William Bradford's second wife, Alice Carpenter Southworth, came to Plymouth aboard the Anne in July 1623 following the death of her first husband, Edward Southworth.[4] Governor Bradford married Carpenter on August 14, 1623 at Plymouth. Bradford and Carpenter had three children, William, Mercy, and Joseph. Alice also helped to raise John, the son of his first marriage; Alice's sons from her first marriage, Constant and Thomas, arrived in Plymouth sometime after 1627 and presumably lived with their mother and stepfather.[5]

William Bradford died at Plymouth, and was interred at Plymouth Burial Hill. On his Grave is etched: "qua patres difficillime adepti sunt nolite turpiter relinquere" “What our forefathers with so much difficulty secured, do not basely relinquish.”

Plymouth Burial Hill

Growing up in England, Bradford took a radical step when he was twelve years old. Inspired by his reading of the Bible and by the sermons of a Puritan minister, Bradford began attending the meetings of a small group of Nonconformists, despite the vehement objections of his family and friends. It was illegal for Nonconformists to worship publicily, so the group met furtively in a private house in the nearby town of Scrooby. In 1606, when the group organized as a separate Congregational church, Bradford joined them. In 1608, under increasing pressure of persecution and fearful that they would be imprisoned, the Scrooby group crossed the North Sea to Holland, the group was aided by Longdon profiteers and merchants, who lent them a ship and a crew as an investment. In September the Nonconformists sailed for America in order to found a community where they would be free to worship and live according to their beliefs.

For Bradford the hardships of the long ocean voyage did not end with landing at Plymouth. In December, while the Mayflower was anchored in Provincetown Harbor, Bradford and other men took a small boat ashore to scout for a place to land and build shelter. When they returned, Bradford learned that his young wife had fallen or jumped from the ship. Perhaps Dorothy Bradford was in despair when land was finally sighted and she did not see the hoped-for green hills of an earthly paradise. Beyond the ship lay only the bleak sand dunes of Cape Cod. That bitter winter, half the settlers were to die of cold, disease, and malnutrition.

a plaque commemorating the original site of Bradford's home on Leyden Street in Plymouth

The following year, Bradford was elected governor of the plantation. "If he had not been a person of more than ordinary piety, wisdom, and courage," the Puritan preacher Cotton Mather later recorded, Bradford would "have sunk" under the difficulties of governing such a shaky settlement. Bradford proved to be an exemplary leader, and he went on to be elected governor of the Colony no fewer than thirty times.

As the Plymouth Colony prospered and grew, it also gradually disintegrated as a religious community, despite Bradford's efforts to hold it together. The ideal of the "city upon a hill," the Pilgrims' dream of an ideal society founded on religious principles, gradually gave way to the realities of life in the new land. Bradford's record of this grand experiment ends in disappointment. When more fertile areas for settlement were found and after Boston became a more convenient port to England, Plymouth then lost much of its population. "Thus was this poor church left," Bradford wrote in 1644, "like an ancient mother grown old and forsaken of her children...Thus, she that had made many rich became herself poor."

Literary Works

The front page of the Bradford journal

William Bradford’s most well-known work by far is Of Plymouth Plantation. It was a detailed history in manuscript form about the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the lives of the Puritan colonists from 1621 to 1646 (Wenska 152)[6]. It is a common misconception that the manuscript was actually Bradford’s journal. Rather, it was a retrospective account of his recollections and observations, written in the form of two books. The first book was written in 1630; the second was never finished, but “between 1646 and 1650, he brought the account of the colony’s struggles and achievements through the year 1646” (Gould 349)[7]. As Walter P. Wenska states, "Bradford writes most of his history out of his nostalgia, long after the decline of Pilgrim fervor and commitment had become apparent. Both the early annals which express his confidence in the Pilgrim mission and the later annals, some of which reveal his dismay and disappointment, were written at about the same time” (152)[6]. In typical Puritan form, Bradford drew deep parallels between everyday life and the events of the Bible. As Philip Gould writes, “Bradford hoped to demonstrate the workings of divine providence for the edification of future generations” (349)[7]. Despite the fact that the manuscript was not published until 1656, the year before his death, it was well-received by his near contemporaries. In 1888 Charles F. Richardson referred to Bradford as a “forerunner of literature” and “a story-teller of considerable power”; Moses Coit Tyler called him “the father of American history” (Wenska 151)[6]. Many American authors have cited the manuscript in their works; for example, Cotton Mather referenced it in Magnolia Christi Americana and Thomas Prince referred to it in A Chronological History of New-England in the Form of Annals. Even today it is considered a valuable piece of American literature, included in anthologies and studied in Literature and History classes. It has been called “‘an American classic’ and ‘the pre-eminent work of art’ in seventeenth-century New England” (Wenska 151)[6]. The Of Plymouth Plantation manuscript disappeared from New England, “presumably stolen by a British soldier during the British occupation of Boston” and reappeared in Fulham, England (Gould 349)[7]. As Philip Gould states, “In 1855, scholars intrigued by references to Bradford in two books on the history of the Episcopal Church in America (both located in England) located the manuscript in the bishop of London’s library at Lambeth Palace” (349)[7]. A long debate ensued as to the rightful home for the manuscript. Multiple attempts by United States Senator George Frisbie Hoar and others to have it returned proved futile at first. According to Francis B. Dedmond, “after a stay of well over a century at Fulham and years of effort to affect its release, the manuscript was returned to Massachusetts” on May 26, 1897 (243)[8].

As previously stated, Bradford’s journal did not become Of Plymouth Plantation. In fact, it was contributed to another work entitled Mourt's Relation which was published in England by one of Bradford’s contemporaries. Published in 1622, it was intended to inform Europeans about the conditions surrounding the American colonists at the Massachusetts Bay Colony. As governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, his work was considered a valuable contribution and was thus included in the book. Despite the fact that the book included a large amount of Bradford’s work it is not typically referenced as one of his significant works due to the fact that it was published under someone else’s name.

In addition to his more well-known work, Bradford also dabbled in poetry. According to Mark L. Sargent, “his poems are often lamentations, sharp indictments of the infidelity and self-interest of the new generation. On occasion, the poems recycle dark images from the history” (418)[9]. Although his poetry is still available today to the interested reader it is not nearly as famous as his manuscript Of Plymouth Plantation.

Bradford’s Dialogues are a collection of fictional conversations between the old and new generations. In the Dialogues, conversations ensue between “younge men” and “Ancient men,” the former being the young colonists of Plymouth, the latter being “the protagonists from Of Plymouth Plantation” (Sargent 413)[9]. As Mark L. Sargent states: “By bringing the young from Plymouth Plantation and the ancients from Of Plymouth Plantation into ‘dialogue,’[…] Bradford wisely dramatizes the act of historical recovery as a negotiation between the two generations, between his young readers and his text” (413)[9]. Today, only a small portion of the Dialogues remain; however, a modified copy made by Nathaniel Morton exists, though it has been altered.

Notable descendants

Hugh Hefner, media and pornography executive, is a claimant of descent from William Bradford[42], but his claims have been disproved by The Mayflower Society.[43]

References

  1. ^ Patricia Scott Deetz; James Deetz. "Mayflower Passenger Deaths, 1620-1621". The Plymouth Colony Archive Project. http://etext.virginia.edu/users/deetz/Plymouth/Maydeaths.html. Retrieved 2006-05-21.  
  2. ^ "William Bradford in 17 Century Records". Pilgrim Hall Museum. http://www.pilgrimhall.org/bradfordwilliamrecords.htm. Retrieved 2006-05-21.  
  3. ^ Austin, Jane Goodwin (1777). "William Bradford's Love Life". Harper's New Monthly Magazine 39 (229): 135–140. http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/moa/pageviewer?frames=1&cite=&coll=&view=50&root=%2Fmoa%2Fharp%2Fharp0039%2F&tif=00145.TIF&pagenum=135.  
  4. ^ Stratton, Eugene Aubrey (1986). Plymouth Colony: Its History & People 1620-1691. USA: Ancestry Incorporated. pp. 365–366. doi:0-916489-13-2. http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0916489183/ref=sib_dp_pt/002-2814230-1648055#reader-link.  
  5. ^ Alice Bradford
  6. ^ a b c d Wenska, Walter P. “Bradford’s Two Histories: Pattern and Paradigm in ‘Of Plymouth Plantation.’” Early American Literature 13.2 (1978): 151-164. Print.
  7. ^ a b c d Gould, Philip. “William Bradford 1590-1657.” The Heath Anthology of American Literature: Beginnings to 1800. Vol. A. 6th ed. Ed. Lauter, Paul. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2009. 348-350. Print.
  8. ^ Dedmond, Francis B, ed. “A Forgotten Attempt to Rescue the Bradford Manuscript.” The New England Quarterly 58.2 (1985): 242-252. Print.
  9. ^ a b c Sargent, Mark L. “William Bradford’s ‘Dialogue’ with History.” The New England Quarterly 65.3 (1992): 389-421. Print.
  10. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. "Genealogical Thoughts by Gary Boyd Roberts #14". New England Historic Genealogical Society. http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/research/special_guests/gary_boyd_roberts/14_659_414.asp. Retrieved 2007-06-24.  
  11. ^ Newcomb, Bethuel Merritt (1923). Andrew Newcomb and his Descendants: A Revised Edition of "Genealogical Memoir of the Newcomb Family" by John Bearse Newcomb. New Haven, CT: The Tuttle, Morhouse, and Taylor Co.
    Daniel LeRoy Martineau, mentioned in the book, is the grandfather of the Baldwin brothers.
  12. ^ Morris, Roy (1996). Ambrose Bierce: Alone In Bad Company. New York: Crown, p. 10. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  13. ^ Bradford, Gamaliel. Correspondence: Guide. Houghton Library, Harvard College University. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  14. ^ Robert Fiske Bradford Papers, 1909-1971, Massachusetts Historical Society; accessed 4 June 2007.
  15. ^ "Blue Bloods," Time; 19 Sept. 1938. On-line source: Time On-line; accessed 4 June 2007.
  16. ^ William Bradford: Sailing Ships and Arctic Seas
  17. ^ The Mayflower Quarterly, Vol. 51, General Society of Mayflower Descendants: 1985 (quarterly journal).
  18. ^ Fitch, Noel Riley. Appetite for Life: The Biography of Julia Child; New York: Doubleday, 1999; pp. 10.
  19. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. "Genealogical Thoughts by Gary Boyd Roberts #36", New England Historic Genealogical Society. On-line source (NewEnglandAncestors.org); accessed 5 May 2007.
  20. ^ Doubleday, Frank Nelson. The Memoirs of a Publisher; New York: Doubleday, 1972; appendices.
  21. ^ See ref for Frederic Edwin Church.
  22. ^ McGilligan, Patrick. Clint: The Life And Legend; New York: St. Martin's Press, 2002; pp. 13.
  23. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~edgerton/FrankEugene1875.htm
  24. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. Notable Kin: Volume Two; Santa Clara, CA: Carl Boyer, 1999.
  25. ^ Sleeper, Jim. "The American Lamonts," The New York Times, "Opinions and Editorials;" on-line publication: 15 October 2006; accessed 5 May 2007.
  26. ^ Lamont, Corliss, ed. The Thomas Lamonts In America; New York: A. S. Barnes, 1971. The family-published history of the Lamont family in America details how the socialist Lamonts arrived in America in the 1750s and married into New England Pilgrim and Puritan families, including descendants of William Bradford.
  27. ^ The Mayflower Quarterly, Vol. 64, General Society of Mayflower Descendants: 1998 (quarterly journal).
  28. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd and Wood, Michael J. "Notable Kin: Foreign Prime Ministers or Presidents with New England-Derived Forebears or Wives: Part II - Europe", New England Historic Genealogical Society. On-line source (NewEnglandAncestors.org); accessed 10 June 2007.
  29. ^ Ancestry of Mitt Romney (This link shows McClellan's (and Benjamin Spock's) descent from the Joshua Ripley who married Mary Backus, also ancestors of Christopher Reeve. Look at the source for Reeve to see that Joshua Ripley was the son of Joshua Ripley and Hannah Bradford, the grandson of William Bradford and Alice Richards, and the great-grandson of Governor William Bradford.)
  30. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. "Royal Descents, Notable Kin, and Printed Sources #48", New England Historic Genealogical Society. On-line source (NewEnglandAncestors.org); accessed 1 June 2007.
  31. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. "Royal Descents, Notable Kin, and Printed Sources #77", New England Historic Genealogical Society. On-line source (NewEnglandAncestors.org); accessed 4 May 2007.
  32. ^ Ancestry of William Rehnquist (William Bradford, #1702 in Rehnquist's ahnentafel, was the son of Governor William Bradford.)
  33. ^ Scott, Fred. Clifton William Scott and Mildred Evelyn Bradford Scott of Ashfield, Mass.: Volume 1 (Genealogical record); iUniverse, 2004; pp. 423.
  34. ^ Young, Alfred. Masquerade: The Life and Times of Deborah Sampson, Continental Soldier; New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004; pp. 4-5.
  35. ^ See ref for George B. McClellan.
  36. ^ See first ref for Deborah Sampson.
  37. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. "Genealogical Thoughts by Gary Boyd Roberts #42", New England Historic Genealogical Society. On-line source (NewEnglandAncestors.org); accessed 10 June 2007.
  38. ^ Pierce, Edward L. Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Perseus Digital Library, Tufts University; on-line source, accessed 15 June 2007.
  39. ^ "Noah Webster"; Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th ed. (1911). On-line source: "Classic Encyclopedia;" accessed 4 May 2007
  40. ^ Biddle, Flora Miller. The Whitney Women and the Museum They Made New York: Arcade Publishing, 1999; pp. 26. Account of F. M. Biddle, president emeritus of the Whitney Museum, describes the descent of W. C. Whitney's mother Laurinda Collins (Whitney) from Bradford.
  41. ^ "William Collins Whitney (1841 - 1904)". The Whitney Research Group, 1999; accessed 4 May 2007.
  42. ^ "Mr. Playboy"; Isenberg, Barbara. Time, on-line: 2 October 2005; accessed 4 May 2007.
  43. ^ The Mayflower Quarterly, "Letters," Vol. 72, No. 2 (June 2006), publication of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants.

External links

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

The signing of the Mayflower Compact (November 21, 1620)

William Bradford (March 19, 1590May 9, 1657) was a leader of the Pilgrim settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, and became Governor of the Plymouth Colony. He was the second signer and primary architect of the Mayflower Compact. As Governor of Plymouth, Bradford is also credited as being the first to proclaim what popular American culture viewed as the first Thanksgiving.

Sourced

Of Pilgrim Plantation (1620-1647)

  • They knew they were pilgrims.
    • Ch. 7
  • So they committed themselves to the will of God and resolved to proceed.
    • Ch. 9
  • Being thus arrived in a good harbor, and brought safe to land, they fell upon their knees and blessed the God of Heaven who had brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and delivered them from all the perils and miseries thereof, again to set their feet on the firm and stable earth, their proper element.
    • Ch. 9
  • Our fathers were Englishmen which came over this great ocean, and were ready to perish in this wilderness.
    • Ch. 9
  • The loss of...honest and industrious men's lives cannot be valued at any price.
    • Ch. 12
  • But it pleased God to visit us then with death daily, and with so general a disease that the living were scarce able to bury the dead.
    • Ch. 12
  • Cold comfort to fill their hungry bellies.
    • Ch. 13
  • Behold, now, another providence of God. A ship comes into the harbor.
    • Ch. 13
  • Thus out of small beginnings greater things have been produced by His hand that made all things of nothing, and gives being to all things that are; and, as one small candle may light a thousand, so the light here kindled hath shone unto many, yea in some sort to our whole nation.
    • Ch. 21

External links

Wikipedia

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

Early Governor of Plymouth_Colony settler (1620) from the Mayflower

Contents

Vital Statistics

Famous Mayflower pilgrim and governor of the Plymouth Bay Colony. Credited for establishing the 1st Thanksgiving in America.

  • Son of William Bradford (1564-1591) and Alice Hanson (1562-1597)
  • Born March 19, 1590 in Austerfield, Yorkshire, England - Manor House
  • Died May 9, 1657 in Plymouth, Massachusetts
  • 1st Married to Dorothy May (?-1620)
  • 2nd Married to Alice Carpenter

Biography

The leader of the Separatist settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, and was elected thirty times to be the Governor after John Carver died. He was the second signer and primary architect of the Mayflower Compact in Provincetown Harbor. His journal (1620–47), was published as Of Plymouth Plantation. Bradford is credited as the first to proclaim what popular American culture now views as the first Thanksgiving.

William Bradford was born on March 19, 1590 near Doncaster, in Austerfield, Yorkshire. At an early age, he was attracted to the "primitive" congregational church, in nearby Scrooby, and became a committed member of what was termed a "Separatist" church, since the church-members had wanted to separate from the Church of England.

On December 7, 1620, before the colony was established, Bradford's wife died. Dorothy Bradford died while the Mayflower was at anchor in Provincetown Harbor. However, there are no contemporary accounts of the circumstances of her death, only a later mention of drowning by Cotton Mather in Magnalia Christi Americana. Bradford included only brief mention of her passing in his own writing.

The first winter in the new colony was a terrible experience. Half the colonists perished, including the colony's leader, John Carver. Bradford was selected as his replacement on the spring of 1621. From this point, his story is inextricably linked with the history of the Plymouth Colony.

William Bradford's second wife, Alice Carpenter Southworth, came to Plymouth aboard the Anne in July 1623 following the death of her first husband, Edward Southworth.[4] Governor Bradford married Carpenter on August 14, 1623 at Plymouth. Bradford and Carpenter had three children, William, Mercy, and Joseph. Alice also helped to raise John, the son of his first marriage; Alice's sons from her first marriage, Constant and Thomas, arrived in Plymouth sometime after 1627 and presumably lived with their mother and stepfather.[5]

William Bradford died at Plymouth, and was interred at Plymouth Burial Hill. On his Grave is etched: "qua patres difficillime adepti sunt nolite turpiter relinquere" “What our forefathers with so much difficulty secured, do not basely relinquish.”

Family of William Bradford and Dorothy May

  • John Bradford (1615-1678)

Family of William Bradford and Alice Carpenter

  • Major William Bradford (1624-1704) - military commander of the Plymouth forces during King Philip's War (June 16, 1624 - February 20, 1703)
  • Mercy Bradford (1630-?)
  • Joseph Bradford (1630-1714)

Famous Descendants

  • Serena Armstrong-Jones, Viscountess Linley, wife of David Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley
  • The Baldwin brothers; (Alec, Daniel, William, and Stephen) American actors
  • Ambrose Bierce - American dystopian novelist and satirist
  • Gamaliel Bradford (1768-1824),- American Revolutionary War officer, and his descendants, including Gamaliel Bradford (1863-1932), American biographer and journalist
  • Robert F. Bradford, - American lawyer, Republican Party strategist, and Governor of Massachusetts from 1947 to 1949
  • William Bradford (1624-1703), military commander of the Plymouth forces during King Philip's War[citation needed]
  • William Bradford (1729-1808), American physician, lawyer, and U.S. Senator from Rhode Island[citation needed]
  • William Bradford (painter), American painter, photographer, and explorer
  • James G. Carter, American congregational minister, Massachusetts State Representative, and pioneer of Normal schools and public education
  • Julia Child, - American entrepreneur and chef of French and French-influenced cuisine
  • Frederic Edwin Church, American landscape painter
  • Frank Nelson Doubleday, American publisher, and his descendants, including Nelson Doubleday, Nelson Doubleday, Jr., and Russell Doubleday
  • George Eastman, American inventor and the founder of the Eastman Kodak Company
  • Clint Eastwood, American film actor, director, and producer
  • Charles Dana Gibson, - illustrator, best known for his "Gibson girl" drawings
  • Edward "Ned" Lamont, American businessman and Democratic Party politician
  • John Lithgow,[22] American actor and philanthropist
  • Jan Masaryk,[23] Czechoslovak diplomat and politician
  • George B. McClellan, - Civil War general, Governor of New Jersey, Democratic opponent of Abraham Lincoln in the 1864 United States presidential election
  • Thomas Pynchon, - American short story writer and novelist
  • Christopher Reeve, American film actor and political activist
  • William Rehnquist, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1972 to 1986 and Chief Justice of the United States from 1986 until his death in 2005
  • Deborah Sampson, female member of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War
  • Benjamin Spock, - child care specialist and author
  • Adlai Stevenson III, - United States Democratic Senator representing Illinois from 1970 to 1981, two-time candidate for Governor of Illinois
  • Alfred Sturtevant, American geneticist
  • Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr.,- publisher of the New York Times since 1992
  • Charles Sumner,[34] American statesman and Republican Party politician
  • Noah Webster,[35] American educator, journalist, and lexicographer noted for his Webster's Dictionary
  • Sheldon Whitehouse, Senator from Rhode Island
  • William Collins Whitney - American financier and politician, and his descendants, the Whitney family

Bradford's Passenger List

From his own hand, the listing of passengers of the 1620 Mayflower

William Bradford, and Dorothy, his wife; having but one child, a sone, left behind, who came afterward.

References

Bradford kept a handwritten journal detailing the history of the first 30 years of Plymouth Colony. Large parts of this journal were published as Of Plymouth Plantation, and have been republished a number of times. (It is currently in print as ISBN 0-07-554281-1.) Bradford, along with Edward Winslow and others, contributed material to George Morton, who merged everything into a book, published in London in 1622, nicknamed Mourt's Relation, which was primarily a journal of the colonists' first years at Plymouth.

Facts about William Bradford (1590-1657)RDF feed

This article uses material from the "William Bradford (1590-1657)" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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