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William Juxon
Archbishop of Canterbury
Enthroned 1660
Reign ended 1663
Predecessor William Laud
Successor Gilbert Sheldon
Personal details
Born 1582
Died 4 June 1663
Lambeth, London
Buried Chapel of St. John's College, Oxford

William Juxon (1582 – 4 June 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1660 until his death.

Life

He was the son of Robert Juxon and was born probably at Chichester, and educated at Merchant Taylors' School, London, and St John's College, Oxford, where he was elected to a scholarship in 1598. He studied law at Oxford, but afterwards took holy orders, and in 1609 became vicar of St Giles, Oxford, where he stayed until he became rector of Somerton, Oxfordshire, in 1615. In December 1621 he succeeded his friend, William Laud, as President (ie. principal) of St John's College, and in 1626 and 1627 he was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford. Juxon soon obtained other important positions, including that of chaplain-in-ordinary to King Charles I.

In 1627 he was made Dean of Worcester and in 1632 he was nominated to the bishopric of Hereford and resigned the presidency of St John's in January 1633. However, he never took up duties at Hereford, as in October 1633 he was consecrated Bishop of London in succession to Laud.

In March 1636 Charles I entrusted Juxon with important secular duties by making him Lord High Treasurer of England as well as First Lord of the Admiralty; for the next five years he had to deal with many financial and other difficulties. He resigned the treasurership in May 1641. During the Civil War, the bishop, against whom no charges were brought in parliament, lived undisturbed at Fulham Palace. His advice was often sought by the king, who had a very high opinion of him. The king selected Juxon to be with him on the scaffold and to offer him the last rites before his execution.

Juxon was deprived of his bishopric in 1649 and retired to Little Compton in Gloucestershire, where he had bought an estate, and became famous as the owner of a pack of hounds. At the restoration of King Charles II he became Archbishop of Canterbury and in his official capacity he took part in the new king's coronation, but his health soon began to fail and he died at Lambeth. By his will the archbishop was a benefactor to St John's College, where he was buried; he also aided the work of restoring St Paul's Cathedral and rebuilt the great hall at Lambeth Palace.

Juxon House, which stands north-west of St Paul's Cathedral at the top of Ludgate Hill and forms part of the Paternoster Square development, is named after him.

References

Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Lindsey
First Lord of the Admiralty
1636–1638
Succeeded by
The Earl of Northumberland
as Lord High Admiral
In commission
William Laud
First Lord of the Treasury
Lord High Treasurer
1636–1641
In commission
The Lord Littelton
First Lord of the Treasury
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Francis Godwin
Bishop of Hereford
1634–1634
Succeeded by
Godfrey Goodman
Preceded by
William Laud
Bishop of London
1633–1649
Vacant
Title next held by
Gilbert Sheldon
Vacant
Title last held by
William Laud
Archbishop of Canterbury
1660–1663
Succeeded by
Gilbert Sheldon
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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Database error article)

From LoveToKnow 1911

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