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William Nassau de Zuylestein, 4th Earl of Rochford: Wikis

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The Earl of Rochford.

William Henry Nassau de Zuylestein, 4th Earl of Rochford, KG, PC (1717 – 28 September 1781) was a British diplomat and statesman. Having gained experience as envoy at Turin from 1749 to 1753, he was ambassador at Madrid from 1763 to 1766 and at Paris from 1766 to 1768. From 1768 to 1775 he was Secretary of State successively for the Northern and Southern Departments. He died childless and was succeeded in his peerage titles by his nephew, the 5th Earl.

William Henry Nassau de Zuylestein has the dubious honour of being the casting vote in the British parliament when the bill to rescind the "obnoxious" American taxes was voted upon. He voted against the motion, setting the stage for the American War of Independence.

See also

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Unknown
British Minister at Turin
1749-1753
Succeeded by
Unknown
Vacant
no relations due to war
Title last held by
George Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol
British ambassador to Spain
1763-1766
Succeeded by
Sir James Grey, Bt
Preceded by
The Duke of Richmond
British Ambassador to France
1766–1768
Succeeded by
The Earl Harcourt
Political offices
Preceded by
The Viscount Weymouth
Secretary of State for the Northern Department
1768–1770
Succeeded by
The Earl of Sandwich
Preceded by
The Viscount Weymouth
Secretary of State for the Southern Department
1770–1775
Succeeded by
The Viscount Weymouth
Honorary titles
Vacant
Title last held by
The 1st Earl Waldegrave
Vice-Admiral of Essex
1748–1781
Succeeded by
The Lord Howard de Walden
Preceded by
The Earl Fitzwalter
Lord Lieutenant of Essex
1756–1781
Succeeded by
The 3rd Earl Waldegrave
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Frederick Nassau de Zuylestein
Earl of Rochford
1738–1781
Succeeded by
William Nassau de Zuylestein
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