Williamson County, Illinois: Wikis

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Williamson County, Illinois
Map of Illinois highlighting Williamson County
Location in the state of Illinois
Map of the U.S. highlighting Illinois
Illinois's location in the U.S.
Seat Marion
Largest city Marion
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

444 sq mi (1,151 km²)
423 sq mi (1,097 km²)
21 sq mi (54 km²), 4.72%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

61,296
145/sq mi (56/km²)
Founded 1839
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Williamson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. As of 2000, the population was 61,296. Its county seat is Marion, Illinois[1]. Williamson is a rapidly growing county in the Metro Lakeland area and is located 88 air miles (120 miles by interstate) southeast of St. Louis, MO at the intersection of Interstate 57, Interstate 24, and Illinois Route 13, a main east-west 4-lane expressway connecting the major communities of Murphysboro, Carbondale, Carterville, Herrin, Marion, and Harrisburg, IL. Although the Williamson County population is only 61,296, it is located in the heart of the Metro Lakeland area of Jackson-Williamson Counties where 120,000 citizens of Illinois make their home. Carbondale (14 miles west), Herrin and Marion, IL are the key urban areas in Metro Lakeland with a combined population of over 57,000. Over 235,000 people live within 35 miles.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 444 square miles (1,151 km²), of which 423 square miles (1,097 km²) is land and 21 square miles (54 km²) (4.72%) is water.

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Major highways

Township map

Map of Christian County, Illinois.
 

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1840 4,457
1850 7,216 61.9%
1860 12,205 69.1%
1870 17,329 42.0%
1880 19,324 11.5%
1890 22,226 15.0%
1900 27,796 25.1%
1910 45,098 62.2%
1920 61,092 35.5%
1930 53,880 −11.8%
1940 51,424 −4.6%
1950 48,621 −5.5%
1960 46,117 −5.2%
1970 49,021 6.3%
1980 56,538 15.3%
1990 57,733 2.1%
2000 61,296 6.2%
UVa Census Browser 1840-1890[2]
Illinois Counties 1900-1990[3]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 61,296 people, 25,358 households, and 16,964 families residing in the county. The population density was 145 people per square mile (56/km²). There were 27,703 housing units at an average density of 65 per square mile (25/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.34% White, 2.49% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 0.98% from two or more races. 1.24% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.1% were of German, 18.1% American, 13.7% English, 12.9% Irish and 6.6% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 25,358 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.40% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.10% were non-families. 28.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the county the population was spread out with 22.90% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 27.90% from 25 to 44, 24.10% from 45 to 64, and 16.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 93.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,991, and the median income for a family was $40,692. Males had a median income of $32,386 versus $21,570 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,779. About 11.40% of families and 14.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.60% of those under age 18 and 10.60% of those age 65 or over.

Political subdivisions

Cities and towns

Townships

  • Blairsville
  • Carterville
  • Corinth
  • Crab Orchard
  • Creal Springs
  • East Marion
  • Grassy
  • Herrin
  • Lake Creek
  • Southern
  • Stonefort
  • West Marion

History

Williamson County was formed out of Franklin County on February 28, 1839, and was named for Williamson County, Tennessee.[5]

Williamson County is often referred to as "Bloody Williamson" due to several outbreaks of violence that have few parallels in American history.[6] These include the following: the Bloody Vendetta, 1876; the Carterville Massacre, 1899; Coal Strike, 1906; The Herrin Massacre, 1922; the Klan War, 1924-1926; the Birger/Shelton Gang War, 1926.

The Illinois National Guard was deployed repeatedly during the 1920s to separate the warring parties and attempt to keep order.

As with the entire United States, severe weather in Williamson County is not uncommon. The northwest section of the county was obliterated by the Tri-State Tornado of 1925. The county was also struck by 2 tornadoes on May 29, 1982 killing 10 people in the Marion, Illinois tornado outbreak. On May 8, 2009, the cities of Carterville, Herrin, and Marion were severely damaged by the May 2009 Southern Midwest derecho.

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ Historical Census Browser, University of Virginia, Geospacial and Statistical Data Center, 2004, http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/histcensus/index.html 
  3. ^ Illinois Counties 1900-1990, U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/il190090.txt 
  4. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ Adams, James N. (compiler) (1989), Keller, William E., ed., Illinois Place Names, Springfield: Illinois State Historical Society, pp. 609, ISBN 0912226242 
  6. ^ Angle, Paul M. (1992). Bloody Williamson - A Chapter in American Lawlessness. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-06233-7. 

See also

Coordinates: 37°44′N 88°56′W / 37.73°N 88.93°W / 37.73; -88.93


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

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Williamson County, Illinois
Map
File:Map of Illinois highlighting Williamson County.png
Location in the state of Illinois
Map of the USA highlighting Illinois
Illinois's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1839
Seat Marion
Largest City Marion
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 4.72%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

61296
Time zone Central : UTC-6/-5

Williamson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. As of 2000, the population was 61,296. Its county seat is Marion6. Williamson is a rapidly growing county in the Metro Lakeland area and is located 88 air miles (120 miles by interstate) southeast of St. Louis, MO at the intersection of Interstate 57, Interstate 24, and Illinois Route 13, a main east-west 4-lane expressway connecting the major communities of Murphysboro, Carbondale, Carterville, Herrin, Marion, and Harrisburg. Although the Williamson County population is only 61,296, it is located in the heart of the Metro Lakeland area of Jackson-Williamson Counties where 120,000 citizens of Illinois make their home. Carbondale (14 miles west), Herrin and Marion are the key urban areas in Metro Lakeland with a combined population of over 57,000. Over 235,000 people live within 35 miles.[1]

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,151 km² (444 sq mi). 1,097 km² (423 sq mi) of it is land and 54 km² (21 sq mi) of it (4.72%) is water.

Adjacent Counties

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 61,296 people, 25,358 households, and 16,964 families residing in the county. The population density was 56/km² (145/sq mi). There were 27,703 housing units at an average density of 25/km² (65/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 95.34% White, 2.49% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 0.98% from two or more races. 1.24% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 25,358 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.40% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.10% were non-families. 28.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the county the population was spread out with 22.90% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 27.90% from 25 to 44, 24.10% from 45 to 64, and 16.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 93.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,991, and the median income for a family was $40,692. Males had a median income of $32,386 versus $21,570 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,779. About 11.40% of families and 14.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.60% of those under age 18 and 10.60% of those age 65 or over.

History

Williamson County was formed out of Franklin County in 1839. It is named for Williamson County, and for Hugh Williamson, a physician in the Revolutionary War and North Carolina delegate to the United States Constitutional Convention.

Williamson County is often referred to as "Bloody Williamson", on account of several outbreaks of violence that have few parallels in American history. These include the following: The Bloody Vendetta, 1876; Coal Strike, 1906; The Herrin Massacre, 1922; The Klan War, 1924; The Birger/Shelton War, (Charles Birger, Shelton Brothers Gang), 1927.

The Illinois National Guard was deployed repeatedly during the 1920's to separate the warring parties and attempt to keep order.

Cities and towns

See also

References

Coordinates: 37°44′N 88°56′W / 37.73, -88.93

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Williamson County, Illinois. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Williamson County, IllinoisRDF feed
County names Williamson County, Illinois  +
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Illinois  +
Short name Williamson County  +

This article uses material from the "Williamson County, Illinois" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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