Winn Parish, Louisiana: Wikis

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Winn Parish, Louisiana
Map of Louisiana highlighting Winn Parish
Location in the state of Louisiana
Map of the U.S. highlighting Louisiana
Louisiana's location in the U.S.
Seat Winnfield
Largest city Winnfield
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

957 sq mi (2,478 km²)
950 sq mi (2,462 km²)
6 sq mi (17 km²), 0.67%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

16,894
18/sq mi (7/km²)
Founded 1852
Named for Louisiana state legislator Walter Winn or Winfield Scott, general in the Mexican-American War and 1852 presidential candidate
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Winn Parish (French: Paroisse de Winn) is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. Its seat is Winnfield. In 2000, its population was 16,894.

Contents

History

Winn Parish was established in 1852 from lands which had belonged to the parishes of Catahoula, Natchitoches, and Rapides.

During the American Civil War, David Pierson, a young attorney, was elected to represent Winn Parish at the Secession Convention called by Governor Thomas Overton Moore in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in January 1861. Pierson voted against secession in all votes taken and refused, along with several others, to change his "no" vote at the end of the process when asked to do so in order that the vote for secession be made unanimous. Winn Parish refused to secede from the Union because it was very poor, and it considered the secession cause to be a rich man's one, a war over slavery.[1]

The Confederate States Army defeated a Union Army detachment sent to destroy the Drake Salt Works in the area.

After the American Civil War, bandits roamed the Natchez Trace or Harrisonburg Road that ran through the lower part of the parish. Among the worst were the West and Kimbrell Clan whose membership briefly included Frank and Jesse James. For seven years they preyed especially on travelers and migrants passing through the area. The later gang headed by Jesse James has been characterized as part of a continuing guerrilla insurgency mounted by Confederate veterans after the Civil War.[2]

In April 1873 white militia from Winn Parish joined in the Colfax Massacre in neighboring Grant Parish, putting down what they called a riot by freedmen as an aftermath to the disputed gubernatorial election of 1872. Columbus Nash, the former sheriff of Grant Parish, and head of the white militia, in 1874 formed the White League, whose first chapter was made up of members of white militia from Grant, Winn and Rapides parishes. Chapters of the White League formed in other rural areas of the state.

The paramilitary group operated openly to restore white supremacy, overthrow Republican rule and disfranchise freedmen, using violence, intimidation and assassination, in what has been described as the second stage of insurgency after the Civil War.[3] They were instrumental in white Democrats' regaining control of the state legislature in Louisiana in the 1870s.[4][5]

Winn Parish is the traditional home of the former Long family Democratic political dynasty. It is the birthplace of Huey Long, Earl Kemp Long, and Oscar K. Allen, former governors of Louisiana. Earl Long is buried in a public square known as the Earl K. Long State Park in Winnfield. The city also hosts the Louisiana Political Museum and Hall of Fame, which opened in 1993 and is located across the street in a former railroad depot from the Winn Parish Enterprise newspaper.

Alexandria businessman Morgan W. Walker, Sr. (1893-1983), a co-founder of Continental Trailways, was a Winn Parish native. Charlton Lyons practiced law in Winn Parish briefly in the 1920s. He went on to become a successful oil man in Shreveport and helped build a competitive Republican Party in the state. In 1964 he ran as a Republican candidate for governor, receiving a record-breaking 37% of the votes as a Republican candidate.

The late trial and appellate Judge Henry L. Yelverton of Lake Charles was born in Winn Parish in 1928.

Prominent Winnfield businessman P.K. Smith, founder of P.K. Smith Motors, served in the Louisiana House from Winn Parish from 1960-1964. Smith was preceded and succeeded in the House by Ashton B. Collier, a Democrat from Atlanta. James R. Fannin, a Winn Parish native, is the current representative from state House District 13, based in Jonesboro but including northern Winn Parish.

The parish has a total area of 957 square miles (2,478 km²), of which, 950 square miles (2,462 km²) of it is land and 6 square miles (17 km²) of it (0.67%) is water.

Winn is separated from Natchitoches Parish along U.S. Highway 71 by Saline Bayou, the first blackwater protected waterway in the American South.

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Major highways

Highways in Winn Parish include U.S. Highway 71, U.S. Highway 84, U.S. Highway 167, Louisiana Highway 34, Louisiana Highway 126, Louisiana Highway 127, Louisiana Highway 156, Louisiana Highway 471, Louisiana Highway 499, Louisiana Highway 501, Louisiana Highway 505, and Louisiana Highway 1228.

Adjacent parishes

National protected area

Demographics

Census Pop.  %±
1900 9,648
1910 18,357 90.3%
1920 16,119 −12.2%
1930 14,766 −8.4%
1940 16,923 14.6%
1950 16,119 −4.8%
1960 16,034 −0.5%
1970 16,369 2.1%
1980 17,253 5.4%
1990 16,269 −5.7%
2000 16,894 3.8%
Est. 2006 15,835 [6] −6.3%
Winn Parish Census Data[7]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 16,894 people, 5,930 households, and 4,234 families residing in the parish. The population density was 18 people per square mile (7/km²). There were 7,502 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of the parish was 66.27% White, 32.03% Black or African American, 0.50% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. 0.87% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 35.9% were of American and 7.2% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 5,930 households out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.80% were married couples living together, 15.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.60% were non-families. 26.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the parish the population was spread out with 24.80% under the age of 18, 9.60% from 18 to 24, 28.90% from 25 to 44, 22.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 110.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 113.20 males.

The median income for a household in the parish was $25,462, and the median income for a family was $31,513. Males had a median income of $29,094 versus $17,939 for females. The per capita income for the parish was $11,794. About 17.00% of families and 21.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.40% of those under age 18 and 24.20% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Map of Winn Parish, Louisiana With Municipal Labels

Cities and towns

Unincorporated areas

  • Joyce
  • Saint Maurice
  • Tannehill

Education

Winn Parish School Board operates local public schools.

There is also the Huey P. Long Campus of Louisiana Technical College in Winnfield. The facility is being relocated from downtown to north of Winnfield on U.S. Highway 167. Funding for the structure was obtained by former State Senator Mike Smith of Winnfield.

Corrections

Corrections Corporation of America, under contract with Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections, operates the Winn Correctional Center in an unincorporated section of Winn Parish.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Civil War" by Ken Burns
  2. ^ T.J. Stiles, Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War, New York: Vintage Books, paperback 2003
  3. ^ James K. Hogue, "The 1873 Battle of Colfax: Paramilitarism and Counterrevolution in Louisiana", 6 Nov 1997; rev. 27 Jun 2006, pp.1-3, accessed 26 Jun 2008
  4. ^ Eric Foner, Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877, New York: Perennial Classics, Paperback, 2002, pp.550-551
  5. ^ Nicholas Lemann, Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, New York: Farrar Strauss & Giroux, paperback, 2007, pp.24-25, 28-29
  6. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Winn Parish Quickfacts". http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/22/22127.html. Retrieved 2008-02-02.  
  7. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Louisiana Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/la190090.txt. Retrieved 2008-02-02.  
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  9. ^ "Winn Corr. Center." Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections. Accessed September 14, 2008.

Coordinates: 31°57′N 92°38′W / 31.95°N 92.64°W / 31.95; -92.64


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

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Winn Parish, Louisiana
Map
File:Map of Louisiana highlighting Winn Parish.png
Location in the state of Louisiana
Map of the USA highlighting Louisiana
Louisiana's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1852
Seat Winnfield
Largest City Winnfield
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 0.67%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

16894
Time zone Central : UTC-6/-5
Named for: Louisiana state legislator Walter Winn

Winn Parish (French: Paroisse de Winn is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. Its seat is Winnfield. In 2000, its population was 16,894.

Contents

History

Winn Parish was established in 1852 from lands which had belonged to the parishes of Catahoula, Natchitoches, and Rapides.

During the American Civil War, Winn Parish refused to secede from the Union and was a de facto Union enclave in the Confederate state of Louisiana.

Winn Parish is the traditional home of the former Long political dynasty. It is the birthplace of Huey Pierce Long, Jr., Earl Kemp Long, and Oscar K. Allen, former governors of Louisiana. Earl Long is buried in a public square in Winnfield, the site of the Louisiana Political Museum and Hall of Fame, which opened in 1993.

Geography

The parish has a total area of 2,478 km² (957 sq mi). 2,462 km² (950 sq mi) of it is land and 17 km² (6 sq mi) of it (0.67%) is water.

Major Highways

Adjacent parishes

Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there were 16,894 people, 5,930 households, and 4,234 families residing in the parish. The population density was 7/km² (18/sq mi). There were 7,502 housing units at an average density of 3/km² (8/sq mi). The racial makeup of the parish was 66.27% White, 32.03% Black or African American, 0.50% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. 0.87% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,930 households out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.80% were married couples living together, 15.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.60% were non-families. 26.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the parish the population was spread out with 24.80% under the age of 18, 9.60% from 18 to 24, 28.90% from 25 to 44, 22.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 110.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 113.20 males.

The median income for a household in the parish was $25,462, and the median income for a family was $31,513. Males had a median income of $29,094 versus $17,939 for females. The per capita income for the parish was $11,794. About 17.00% of families and 21.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.40% of those under age 18 and 24.20% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Map of Winn Parish, Louisiana With Municipal Labels

Coordinates: 31°57′N 92°38′W / 31.95, -92.64


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Winn Parish, Louisiana. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Winn Parish, LouisianaRDF feed
County names Winn Parish, Louisiana  +
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Louisiana  +
Short name Winn Parish  +

This article uses material from the "Winn Parish, Louisiana" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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