The Full Wiki

Wipeout (1988 game show): Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to Wipeout (1988 US game show) article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wipeout
Wipeout1988Logo.jpg
Wipeout logo.
Format Game show
Created by Bob Fraser
Presented by Peter Tomarken
Narrated by John Harlan
Country of origin  United States
No. of episodes 195
Production
Producer(s) Paramount Television
Running time 30 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Syndicated
Original run September 12, 1988 – June 9, 1989

Wipeout was an American game show, airing from September 12, 1988 to June 9, 1989, with Peter Tomarken as host.

Contents

Main game

Advertisements

First round

Three contestants are presented with a category and a board of sixteen screens consisting of eleven correct answers and five incorrect answers (dubbed "Wipeouts"). The contestant farthest to the left chose an answer and, if it was correct, earned money and kept control of the game. However, if the contestant selected a Wipeout, the contestant lost the money accumulated to that point and control passed to the next player in line. After a correct answer, a contestant could choose another answer or pass control to the next player. Contestants were required to select at least one answer before passing control.

$25 was awarded for the first correct answer, plus an additional $25 for every subsequent correct answer revealed (up to $275 for the eleventh correct answer). The round continued until either all 11 correct answers or all five Wipeouts had been found.

"Hot Spot"

Behind one of the correct answers was a Hot Spot. Finding the Hot Spot awarded a trip or other bonus prize to the contestant. However, in order to win the prize, a contestant must avoid selecting a Wipeout and be one of the two players advancing to round two. If the contestant found a Wipeout while holding the Hot Spot, the Hot Spot was placed behind one of the remaining correct answers.

Ending the round

After the first round, the two highest-scoring players kept their money and advanced to round two. In the event of a tie for second place (usually when two players finished with no money), a tiebreaker board presented with 12 answers, eight correct and four Wipeouts. A coin flip determined which player selected first. The players alternated choosing answers until one found either a Wipeout (and lost) or the eighth correct answer (and won). The survivor advanced to round two.

Challenge round

A board with twelve answers was shown to the contestants, containing eight correct answers and four Wipeouts. Players alternated bidding based on the number of correct answers they could find. Bidding continued until one player challenged another or until the maximum bid of eight correct answers was given. If the player with the higher bid was able to complete the contract, they won the round. However, if a player found a Wipeout, their opponent could steal the round by providing just one correct answer.

In the event that the opponent also found a Wipeout, the original player attempted to fulfill the remainder of their contract by continuing to select correct answers. In Australia, contestants had five seconds to look for answers, after that, each contestant makes a silent bid by pressing a number on their keypad. The player with the highest bid gets to play the board. If both bids are the same, the first player to make a bid got to play first. This normally meant that players already made their bid during the five seconds of looking for the answers to ensure they get to play the board.

The first player to win two boards won the game, a prize, and advanced to the bonus round.

Bonus round

The contestant was given a category and was shown a new board with twelve answers, each on their own monitor. In most versions, six of the twelve answers were correct. The player had to race to the monitors, touch the border around the monitors that he or she thought had the correct answers, then race back and hit a plunger. Upon hitting the plunger, the number of correct answers was revealed, and if it was less than six the player had to race back to the board and make changes. If the contestant found all six correct monitors lit in 60 seconds or less, they won a new car.

Contestants stayed on the show until defeated or won the bonus round.

Versions outside the US

United Kingdom

Australia

Spain

Luis Larrodera currently hosts a version entitled Alta Tensión ("High Tension").

Format changes

Round 1 was played with three boards like the UK. For the first two boards, €100 was awarded for the first answer plus an additional €100 for every subsequent correct answer revealed (up to €1,000 for the tenth correct answer, with only ten correct answers on the board). The third board paid €200 for the first answer plus an additional €200 for every subsequent correct answer revealed (up to €2,000 for the tenth correct answer), in addition to the "Hot Spot" hidden behind one answer on this board only.

Instead of bidding, one player selects a category, after which their opponent selects answers until finding a Wipeout, at which point their opponent takes over control of the board. A player wins the board by selecting the eighth and final correct answer. If one player finds the fourth wrong answer, their opponent automatically wins the board.

In the bonus round, seven of the answers were right, and five were wrong. Similar to Australia, trying to turn on more than seven answers resulted in an error tone and the answer not being activated. Like in America, winning the bonus round awarded a new car.

External links


Wipeout
Format Game Show
Created by Bob Fraser
Presented by Template:Country data USA: Peter Tomarken
Template:Country data UK: Paul Daniels
(1994 - 1997)
Bob Monkhouse
(1998 - 2002)
Template:Country data AUS: Tony Johnston
Country of origin  United States
No. of series Template:Country data USA: 1
Template:Country data UK: 9
Template:Country data AUS: 1
No. of episodes Template:Country data USA: 195
Template:Country data UK: 495
Template:Country data AUS: TBC
Production
Producer(s) Template:Country data USA: Paramount Television
Template:Country data UK: Action Time
Template:Country data AUS: Southern Star
Running time 30mins (inc. adverts)
Broadcast
Original channel Template:Country data USA: Syndication
Template:Country data UK: BBC1
Template:Country data AUS: Seven Network
Original run Template:Country data USA: September 12, 1988 - June 9, 1989
Template:Country data UK: May 25, 1994 – December 3, 2002
Template:Country data AUS: 1999 - 2000

Wipeout was an American game show, airing from September 12, 1988 to June 9, 1989 (with reruns airing until September 8), with Peter Tomarken as host. It also later became a British game show, hosted by Paul Daniels from 1994 to 1997 and later with Bob Monkhouse from 1998 to 2002. It was a children's game show in Australia from 1999 to 2000, hosted by Tony Johnston. A modern version airs in Spain, titled Alta Tensión (literally "High Tension"), and is hosted by Luis Larrodera.

Reruns of the U.S. version aired on the USA Network from September 11, 1989 to September 13, 1991.

Episodes of the British version of the show hosted by Paul Daniels & Bob Monkhouse are currently being re-broadcast on the digital television station Challenge.

Contents

Main Game

Round One

Three contestants are presented with a category and a board of sixteen screens consisting of eleven correct answers and five incorrect answers (dubbed "Wipeouts"). The contestant farthest to the left chose an answer and, if it was correct, earned money and kept control of the game. However, if the contestant selected a Wipeout, the contestant lost the money accumulated to that point and control passed to the next player in line. After a correct answer, a contestant could choose another answer or pass control to the next player. Contestants were required to select at least one answer before passing control. The round continued until either all the correct answers or all the Wipeouts had been found.

Scoring

  • In the US - $25 for the first answer, plus an additional $25 for every subsequent correct answer revealed, up to $275 for the eleventh correct answer.
  • In the UK - £10 for the first answer, plus an additional £10 for every subsequent correct answer revealed, up to £110 for the eleventh correct answer. Three boards are played; scores are cumulative (money won on a previous board can be lost on a later board). In the version with Bob Monkhouse, only two boards were played and each correct answer was worth £50.
  • In Australia - Played in two rounds (with twelve correct answers and four Wipeouts in each), correct answers were worth 25 points each in round one and 50 points each in round two. Also, after an answer, play immediately goes to the next player.
  • In Spain - For the first two boards, €100 for the first answer, plus an additional €100 for every subsequent correct answer revealed, up to €1,000 for the tenth correct answer (only ten correct answers are on the board). For the third board, €200 for the first answer, plus an additional €200 for every subsequent correct answer revealed, up to €2,000 for the tenth correct answer. Scores are cumulative, meaning that money won on a previous board can be lost on a later board.

"Hot Spot"

Behind one of the correct answers was a Hot Spot. Finding the Hot Spot awarded a trip or other bonus prize to the contestant. However, in order to win the prize, a contestant must avoid selecting a Wipeout and be one of the two players advancing to round two. If the contestant found a Wipeout while holding the Hot Spot, the Hot Spot was placed behind one of the remaining correct answers.

In the UK if it was behind a Wipeout it would be a bad prize (eg can of oil and lollipop) and a good prize if behind a correct answer (eg designer bags). The prize was theirs to keep, whether they won or not.

In Australia, it was simply called the "Bonus."

In Spain, the bonus prize is hidden on the third board.

End of the round

After the first round, the two highest-scoring players kept their money and advanced to round two. In the event of a tie for second place (usually when two players finished with no money), a tiebreaker board presented with 12 answers, eight correct and four Wipeouts. A coin flip determined which player selected first. The players alternated choosing answers until one found either a Wipeout (and lost) or the eighth correct answer (and won). The survivor advanced to round two. In Australia, there were 6 correct answers and six wipeouts. In addition, play goes first for the next person in line. In the UK a tiebreaker was not played but instead the player to proceed was the one who had given the most correct answers up to that point, if this too was tied the player with the least wipeouts was accepted into round two.

Round Two

The second round was known as the "Challenge Round" in the US, "Wipeout Auction" in the UK, and "Bid for the Grid" in Australia. A board with twelve answers was shown to the contestants containing eight correct answers and four Wipeouts. Players alternated bidding based on the number of correct answers they could find. Bidding continued until one player challenged another or until the maximum bid of eight correct answers was given. If the player with the higher bid was able to complete the contract, they won the round. However, if a player found a Wipeout, their opponent could steal the round by providing just one correct answer. In the event the opponent also chose a Wipeout, the original player attempted to fulfill the remainder of their contract by continuing to select correct answers. In Australia, contestants had five seconds to look for answers, after that, each contestant makes a silent bid by pressing a number on their keypad. The player with the highest bid gets to play the board. If both players bids are the same, the first player to make a bid got to play first. This normally meant that players already made their bid during the five seconds of looking for the answers to ensure they get to play the board.

In Spain, the process is different. Instead of bidding, one of the players selects a category, then their opponent selects answers until picking an incorrect answer, at which point their opponent takes over control of the board. A player wins the board by selecting the eighth and final correct answer. If one player finds the fourth wrong answer, their opponent automatically wins the board.

The first player to win two boards won the game, a prize, and advanced to the bonus round.

The Bonus Round

The contestant was given (or in some versions, chose) a category and was shown a new board with twelve answers; each on their own monitor. In most versions, six of the twelve answers were correct; in Spain, seven of the answers are right, and five are wrong. The player had to race to the monitors, touch the border around the monitors that he or she thought had the correct answers, then race back and hit a plunger. (In Australia and in the Daniels UK version, the player entered his or her answers on an oversized keypad, instead of at the screens. In all other versions, the contestant pressed a button attached to that monitor.) The Australian version allowed players to turn on more than six answers, although a computerized voice would warn them that too many answers were active and should they try to hit the plunger, it would not respond; on the Spanish version, if a player tries to turn on more than seven answers, they hear an error tone, and the answer is not activated. Upon hitting the plunger, the number of correct answers was revealed, and if it was less than six/seven, the player had to race back to the board and make changes. If the contestant found all six/seven correct monitors lit in 60 seconds or less, he or she won the bonus prize.

The bonus prize was a car in the US and Spain, a holiday in the UK, and a special prize in Australia.

In the US, contestants continued to appear on the show until defeated or until winning the bonus round.

External links

About the US version

About the UK version

About the Australian version


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message